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(WXYZ Detroit)   Talking to kids with tough words can help them talk good, too   (wxyz.com) divider line 25
    More: Interesting, toddlers, brain development, complex sentences, flash cards  
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2270 clicks; posted to Main » on 14 Feb 2014 at 5:21 PM (35 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



25 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-02-14 05:01:31 PM  
i liked to read william blake, nabokov, james joyce, david foster wallace... to my son when he was pre-verbal. he must have heard "Lolita" 3 times. there's a time and place for cute stories about cute farm animals learning in a cute way how important it is to have friends and tell the truth, but babyhood isn't it.
 
2014-02-14 05:23:15 PM  
I see what you did their
 
2014-02-14 05:24:28 PM  

the801: i liked to read william blake, nabokov, james joyce, david foster wallace... to my son when he was pre-verbal. he must have heard "Lolita" 3 times. there's a time and place for cute stories about cute farm animals learning in a cute way how important it is to have friends and tell the truth, but babyhood isn't it.


Go on...
 
2014-02-14 05:32:49 PM  
When my daughter was two she could say "this is farking bullshiat" very clearly.
 
2014-02-14 05:41:07 PM  
I got a lot of; "What the fark is wrong with you, you stupid, little shiat."

But what-the-fark-ever. I'm just as farking good at talking smart as any other asshole out there.
 
2014-02-14 05:41:56 PM  
As a firm believer that children rise to the challenge posed I can only say that it is nice to have a research paper agree with me.
 
zez
2014-02-14 05:49:51 PM  
As a stay at home dad I always talked to my kids in complete full on sentences, even when they were infants, mostly because I didn't have anyone else to talk to all day. I would also repeat the sentence using different words that meant the same thing. I don't know if this had anything to do with both kids reading books before age 2 and having an incredible vocabulary but it probably didn't hurt.
 
2014-02-14 05:54:27 PM  
Study provided by Dr. No shiat Sherlock.
 
2014-02-14 06:06:27 PM  
So when ever you see someone using stupid baby talk and sounding like a moron just whip out this article.
 
2014-02-14 06:18:50 PM  

zez: As a stay at home dad I always talked to my kids in complete full on sentences, even when they were infants, mostly because I didn't have anyone else to talk to all day. I would also repeat the sentence using different words that meant the same thing. I don't know if this had anything to do with both kids reading books before age 2 and having an incredible vocabulary but it probably didn't hurt.


Good on you. It takes patience.

In my neighborhood, I have watched a few different sets of kids grow up. All of them have good parents, but there were profound differences in the way those parents spoke to their children. Not surprisingly, the parents who answered their children's queries of "Why?" or "How?" with logical, intelligent, adult answers have offspring who are faring much better in school and life  than the ones who just gave answers like, "Ooooh! It's MAGIC!" or some other baby talk answer.
 
2014-02-14 06:32:48 PM  
Oh, hmm...we've been screaming unintelligible Vietnamese at our kids and kicking them in the stomach when they do good. Maybe we'll try this method instead.
 
2014-02-14 06:34:57 PM  
Baby talk is actually designed to help babies hear sounds better.

But you can talk to a baby while empasizing phonemes and still use complete sentences.
 
2014-02-14 06:42:27 PM  
When they were infants and toddlers, we always spoke to our girls using proper sentences.  Later, when they were in school, we would improvise word games at the dinner table. Being grammar nazis, Mrs.Capt and I always insisted that whichever language they were using, it had to be spoken correctly.

Today both are multilingual and in professions that require and reward proper communication skills.

Speaking complete, grammatically correct (hopefully) sentences is such a habit, that I find myself doing it with the cats. Mabel doesn't understand and Sam is ok with it as long as he is also cuddled. Charlie, being a feline genius, stares intently in what I am convinced is an effort to understand.
 
2014-02-14 06:46:35 PM  

DerAppie: As a firm believer that children rise to the challenge posed I can only say that it is nice to have a research paper agree with me.


It is so. Have seen way too many examples to think anything else, especialy with my peers, growing up.

/yes, there are exceptions
//and kids with too many "challenges" they shouldn't be burdened with, even if they do have positive influences
 
2014-02-14 06:50:37 PM  

Contrabulous Flabtraption: Oh, hmm...we've been screaming unintelligible Vietnamese at our kids and kicking them in the stomach when they do good. Maybe we'll try this method instead.


You kids do good, like Superman and Mother Teresa? That's something to be proud of.
 
2014-02-14 06:53:24 PM  
Me talk pretty.
 
2014-02-14 06:58:20 PM  

lindalouwho: DerAppie: As a firm believer that children rise to the challenge posed I can only say that it is nice to have a research paper agree with me.

It is so. Have seen way too many examples to think anything else, especialy with my peers, growing up.

/yes, there are exceptions
//and kids with too many "challenges" they shouldn't be burdened with, even if they do have positive influences


As with all things it is about balance. No gravity causes all kinds of farked up stuff to go wrong with the body while too much will flatten the body to a pancake. What is needed is the sweet spot in the middle. The difficulty is finding that in a child and maintaining it.

/Using normal speech and reading to them from normal books isn't that much of a burden on them
 
2014-02-14 06:59:33 PM  
www.cleveredfool.com
 
2014-02-14 07:57:08 PM  
I like to read my kids nothing but James Patterson, Dan Brown and Soldier of Fortune magazine.
 
2014-02-14 08:08:09 PM  
My neighbor freaked out when my three year old said "We don't touch the chemicals under the sink."  We talked to her like a real person, no baby talk.

"The Book of Shadowboxes: A Story of the ABCs" is the only ABC book you can read to your kids over and over without going batshiat insane.
 
2014-02-14 08:23:49 PM  

aerojockey: Baby talk is actually designed to help babies hear sounds better.

But you can talk to a baby while empasizing phonemes and still use complete sentences.


Um no, baby talk is used to get a baby's attention and to signal that the speech is directed to it and not other people in the vicinity. Thus a mom can talk with a baby and the dad at the same and the baby can distinguish which of the mom's words are directed to it.

Of course the mom can just talk normally and look at the intended target to signal who the speech is for. However in an environment where there are lots of people talking baby talk  can signal when to attend and to distinguish it from the general buzzing confusion.

Small families have no need for baby talk.

// I've never heard anyone yell at their kids in baby talk.
 
2014-02-14 08:24:15 PM  

Ker_Thwap: My neighbor freaked out when my three year old said "We don't touch the chemicals under the sink."  We talked to her like a real person, no baby talk.

"The Book of Shadowboxes: A Story of the ABCs" is the only ABC book you can read to your kids over and over without going batshiat insane.


Thanks for the book suggestion, because I am farking tired of zizzer zazzer zuz and Dr. Suess can go to hell.

He vomited 12 gallons of...stuff...the other day. Looked up, "uh oh, pyoook! Clean up!"

"Yes sir, right away sir!"

"Yeah godammit"

My 2 year old says god dammit.

God dammit! I mean, sorry, fark! Dammit, wait. I'm sorry. shiat. Dammit!

We have a swear jar now.
 
2014-02-14 08:52:53 PM  

White_Scarf_Syndrome: Ker_Thwap: My neighbor freaked out when my three year old said "We don't touch the chemicals under the sink."  We talked to her like a real person, no baby talk.

"The Book of Shadowboxes: A Story of the ABCs" is the only ABC book you can read to your kids over and over without going batshiat insane.

Thanks for the book suggestion, because I am farking tired of zizzer zazzer zuz and Dr. Suess can go to hell.

He vomited 12 gallons of...stuff...the other day. Looked up, "uh oh, pyoook! Clean up!"

"Yes sir, right away sir!"

"Yeah godammit"

My 2 year old says god dammit.

God dammit! I mean, sorry, fark! Dammit, wait. I'm sorry. shiat. Dammit!

We have a swear jar now.


Print out a copy of The Flyaway Horse by Eugene Field and put it in one of those plastic folders.  It's important that you read things to your kids that you enjoy, as they'll pick up on it if you hate the book.  Avoid the Berenstain Bears at all costs, those made me want to gouge out my eyes.
 
2014-02-14 09:20:56 PM  
I'm poor, but I read quite alot, and tend to talk like Sheldon sometimes. Both of my daughters have been very verbally articulate from a very early age.
 
2014-02-14 11:56:12 PM  
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