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(Slate)   Not to put too fine a point on it, but here's an excellent essay on "Birdhouse In Your Soul"   (slate.com) divider line 60
    More: Spiffy, John Flansburgh, name-dropping, Rick Moranis, Elektra Records, modern rock, sonic weapon, Current sea level rise, pet rock  
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3196 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 13 Feb 2014 at 5:31 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-02-13 05:11:32 PM  
I used to love TMBG and can still sing along to any song from their first three albums.  I've only seen them live once, though, when they were touring with Frank Black as They Might Be Black (renamed to They Might Be Frank for their Memphis show because racism or something).  I haven't seen them since, even though they've had a couple of shows here because they only perform at UCLA when they're in town and it's a poor venue for that kind of show.

/not even a CSB, really
//now off to listen to the Joshua Fried remix of The World's Address
 
2014-02-13 05:28:34 PM  
I was just thinking, last week, about what great song that is, and how Flood was one of those albums that changed how I thought about music.
 
2014-02-13 05:36:03 PM  
 
2014-02-13 05:36:18 PM  

timujin: I've only seen them live once


Same. Awesome show, though. Near the end they took a request from the audience and segued from that song seamlessly into one of their own.
 
2014-02-13 05:44:01 PM  
That song is 25 years old? What have I done with my life? Time flies while fapping on the Internet I guess.
 
2014-02-13 05:45:00 PM  
Raise your hand if you ever called Dial-A-Song...

*raises hand*
 
2014-02-13 05:53:52 PM  
Great song off a great album, but holy balls did that essay suck the joy out of the whole shebang.
 
2014-02-13 05:54:27 PM  

Uzzah: Raise your hand if you ever called Dial-A-Song...

*raises hand*


yup.
 
2014-02-13 05:59:02 PM  
No deal. He'd like to poison my mind with wrong ideas but he is not unkind.
 
2014-02-13 06:01:20 PM  

lostcat: I was just thinking, last week, about what great song that is, and how Flood was one of those albums that changed how I thought about music.


Nothing like this has ever happened to me, and up till now I honestly thought it was just something pretentious idiots in movies said/did.

Can you explain how it changed anything? Music to me is just sort of disposable like, say, electronics.  Sure, there are people out there who collect specific bits and bobbles, but I've never heard anyone say 'this keyboard changed my life' and understood it. So I'm asking politely.
 
2014-02-13 06:02:03 PM  
Who's watching over you????

Ceiling cat.
 
2014-02-13 06:22:16 PM  

timujin: I used to love TMBG and can still sing along to any song from their first three albums.  I've only seen them live once, though, when they were touring with Frank Black as They Might Be Black (renamed to They Might Be Frank for their Memphis show because racism or something).  I haven't seen them since, even though they've had a couple of shows here because they only perform at UCLA when they're in town and it's a poor venue for that kind of show.

/not even a CSB, really
//now off to listen to the Joshua Fried remix of The World's Address


I saw them on the same tour, what a great show it was.  Unfortunately Frank Black was the disappointment of the evening
 
2014-02-13 06:23:53 PM  

FlashHarry: Uzzah: Raise your hand if you ever called Dial-A-Song...

*raises hand*

yup.


Free when you call from work!
 
2014-02-13 06:24:09 PM  

Uzzah: Raise your hand if you ever called Dial-A-Song...

*raises hand*


Hand raised.

I haven't listened to them in years but I saw them four times on the Flood tour (New Haven, CT, Boston and two times in Providence RI.)  They definitely were a band that were a lot better when it was just the two of them on stage with two metronomes on pedestals and backing tapes, rather than the guitar-based indie band they became.  One of my fondest concert memories is how crazy the mosh pit became when the then-brand-new Istanbul Not Constantinople was played as an encore (followed up by a mental Hotel Detective).

/I also fondly remember the incredibly hot Cranston High girl I was hitting on all night
//my lawn, get off of it
 
2014-02-13 06:26:52 PM  
I don't want the world. I just want your half.
 
2014-02-13 06:28:24 PM  
I prefer the Pushing Daisies version to the original.

/ducks
 
2014-02-13 06:34:21 PM  

Cytokine Storm: [i.imgur.com image 400x676]

/amazon


KellyKellyKelly: I prefer the Pushing Daisies version to the original.

/ducks


Ex GF got me one of those specifically BECAUSE I loved the Pushing Daisies version.

/Mad that Chenowith's cover of Eternal Flame was not on the second CD...
 
2014-02-13 06:39:54 PM  
kroonermanblack:
Nothing like this has ever happened to me, and up till now I honestly thought it was just something pretentious idiots in movies said/did.

Can you explain how it changed anything? Music to me is just sort of disposable like, say, electronics.  Sure, there are people out there who collect specific bits and bobbles, but I've never heard anyone say 'this keyboard changed my life' and understood it. So I'm asking politely.


There is no way to explain it to you if you find music to be "just sort of disposable".

I was young and foolish when Flood came out.  I feel old and foolish now.
 
2014-02-13 06:42:35 PM  

kroonermanblack: Can you explain how it changed anything? Music to me is just sort of disposable like, say, electronics.  Sure, there are people out there who collect specific bits and bobbles, but I've never heard anyone say 'this keyboard changed my life' and understood it. So I'm asking politely.


I can't speak for lostcat, but I will say that "Flood" came out my freshman year in college, after an adolescence that primarily involved listening to '80s pop and '60-'70s classic rock -- music that wasn't particularly out to challenge you.

"Flood" wasn't like that. "Birdhouse" was this weird song that had the hooks of pop music, but the form was all wrong -- the weird little intro, the fact that it dumps into the chorus instead of a verse, the lyrics that make no sense at first ("I'm your only friend; I'm not your only friend...") but then suddenly snap into place ("... which stood on rocky shores and kept the beaches shipwreck free") as being clever about something without ever being quite sure what it is, etc. That same pattern continued with "Dead" ("I returned a bag of groceries..." is a head scratcher, but then you get a gem like "Now it's over, I'm dead, and I haven't done anything that I want, or I'm still alive and there's nothing I want to do"). There was a geography lesson in "Istanbul (Not Constantinople)" (which I didn't know at the time was a cover), lyrics about how "everybody wants prosthetic foreheads on their real heads," and a song called "Minimum Wage" that sounded like the theme to a deranged Western film of the same name.

It was music that was edgy and strange, but still melodic enough for a pop fan to enjoy (unlike the punk or jam or metal bands that my friends were starting to discover). There was a cleverness and wit to the lyrics that was unlike anything I had heard in my U2 or Pink Floyd or Huey Lewis albums. The little tempo shifts or strange turns of a phrase were things that forced you to pay a little bit of attention to the music the first several times you listened to it, rather than just putting on an album as background noise. I recognized that this was the kind of music that the me of two years ago wouldn't have wanted to have anything to do with, but now it made me want to not have anything to do with any of the music that the me of two years ago liked.

I'm sure other people had similar experiences with something else -- that hearing "London Calling" or "The Harder They Come" or "Master of Puppets" or whatever for the first time was the thing that totally changed how they listened to music. For some of us, though, it was "Flood."
 
2014-02-13 06:56:33 PM  

kroonermanblack: lostcat: I was just thinking, last week, about what great song that is, and how Flood was one of those albums that changed how I thought about music.

Nothing like this has ever happened to me, and up till now I honestly thought it was just something pretentious idiots in movies said/did.

Can you explain how it changed anything? Music to me is just sort of disposable like, say, electronics.  Sure, there are people out there who collect specific bits and bobbles, but I've never heard anyone say 'this keyboard changed my life' and understood it. So I'm asking politely.


I re-posted this link for my FB friends and people have been commenting about how this album changed their lives as well.

If you don't get music, you don't get it. It's not your thing and that's fine.

The comment I made on this link was that whenever I hear it, I think of hearing it on the radio while I was an angsty teen and we were heading to a store to pick up our broken lawnmower. It happened to be right next to a music store and I was obsessed with getting an electric guitar.

Less than a year later, I convinced my mom to rent me an electric guitar from that same store. We went there and after looking at the rentals and prices, she said "Let's just buy a new guitar and amp. If you don't like it, we'll sell it."

Whenever I think of this song, I think of that store and I think of that day. As tenuous as it may seem, it's a wonderful memory. It brings me back to an optimistic time and a happy memory in my life. And I'm still trying to make music to this day. It's the thing that makes me happy when things are crappy.

So, that's my two cents. But hopefully that gives you some insight.
 
2014-02-13 07:07:07 PM  

Uzzah: kroonermanblack: Can you explain how it changed anything? Music to me is just sort of disposable like, say, electronics.  Sure, there are people out there who collect specific bits and bobbles, but I've never heard anyone say 'this keyboard changed my life' and understood it. So I'm asking politely.

I can't speak for lostcat, but I will say that "Flood" came out my freshman year in college, after an adolescence that primarily involved listening to '80s pop and '60-'70s classic rock -- music that wasn't particularly out to challenge you.

"Flood" wasn't like that. "Birdhouse" was this weird song that had the hooks of pop music, but the form was all wrong -- the weird little intro, the fact that it dumps into the chorus instead of a verse, the lyrics that make no sense at first ("I'm your only friend; I'm not your only friend...") but then suddenly snap into place ("... which stood on rocky shores and kept the beaches shipwreck free") as being clever about something without ever being quite sure what it is, etc. That same pattern continued with "Dead" ("I returned a bag of groceries..." is a head scratcher, but then you get a gem like "Now it's over, I'm dead, and I haven't done anything that I want, or I'm still alive and there's nothing I want to do"). There was a geography lesson in "Istanbul (Not Constantinople)" (which I didn't know at the time was a cover), lyrics about how "everybody wants prosthetic foreheads on their real heads," and a song called "Minimum Wage" that sounded like the theme to a deranged Western film of the same name.

It was music that was edgy and strange, but still melodic enough for a pop fan to enjoy (unlike the punk or jam or metal bands that my friends were starting to discover). There was a cleverness and wit to the lyrics that was unlike anything I had heard in my U2 or Pink Floyd or Huey Lewis albums. The little tempo shifts or strange turns of a phrase were things that forced you to pay a little bit of attention to the music ...


Better put than me.

I remember buying this CD in a "Get 10 albums for $.01" Columbia House offers. It was the best CD of the bunch.

The album was like nothing I've seen before or after. And even the songs I hate on it are fantastic.
 
2014-02-13 07:14:59 PM  

Uzzah: kroonermanblack: Can you explain how it changed anything? Music to me is just sort of disposable like, say, electronics.  Sure, there are people out there who collect specific bits and bobbles, but I've never heard anyone say 'this keyboard changed my life' and understood it. So I'm asking politely.

I can't speak for lostcat, but I will say that "Flood" came out my freshman year in college, after an adolescence that primarily involved listening to '80s pop and '60-'70s classic rock -- music that wasn't particularly out to challenge you.

"Flood" wasn't like that. "Birdhouse" was this weird song that had the hooks of pop music, but the form was all wrong -- the weird little intro, the fact that it dumps into the chorus instead of a verse, the lyrics that make no sense at first ("I'm your only friend; I'm not your only friend...") but then suddenly snap into place ("... which stood on rocky shores and kept the beaches shipwreck free") as being clever about something without ever being quite sure what it is, etc. That same pattern continued with "Dead" ("I returned a bag of groceries..." is a head scratcher, but then you get a gem like "Now it's over, I'm dead, and I haven't done anything that I want, or I'm still alive and there's nothing I want to do"). There was a geography lesson in "Istanbul (Not Constantinople)" (which I didn't know at the time was a cover), lyrics about how "everybody wants prosthetic foreheads on their real heads," and a song called "Minimum Wage" that sounded like the theme to a deranged Western film of the same name.

It was music that was edgy and strange, but still melodic enough for a pop fan to enjoy (unlike the punk or jam or metal bands that my friends were starting to discover). There was a cleverness and wit to the lyrics that was unlike anything I had heard in my U2 or Pink Floyd or Huey Lewis albums. The little tempo shifts or strange turns of a phrase were things that forced you to pay a little bit of attention to the music the first several times you listened to it, rather than just putting on an album as background noise. I recognized that this was the kind of music that the me of two years ago wouldn't have wanted to have anything to do with, but now it made me want to not have anything to do with any of the music that the me of two years ago liked.

I'm sure other people had similar experiences with something else -- that hearing "London Calling" or "The Harder They Come" or "Master of Puppets" or whatever for the first time was the thing that totally changed how they listened to music. For some of us, though, it was "Flood."


All this and their songs make you giggle uncontrollably when smoking marinara cigarettes.

/not high now, just funny auto correct
//Apollo 18 was great
///Shhpider
 
2014-02-13 07:30:40 PM  
I love all the key changes in that tune, it's really well written.
 
2014-02-13 07:42:21 PM  
"The song is barely three minutes long, but it changes keys  18 times."

No, it doesn't do that.
 
2014-02-13 07:44:02 PM  

Uzzah: kroonermanblack: Can you explain how it changed anything? Music to me is just sort of disposable like, say, electronics.  Sure, there are people out there who collect specific bits and bobbles, but I've never heard anyone say 'this keyboard changed my life' and understood it. So I'm asking politely.

I can't speak for lostcat, but I will say that "Flood" came out my freshman year in college, after an adolescence that primarily involved listening to '80s pop and '60-'70s classic rock -- music that wasn't particularly out to challenge you.

"Flood" wasn't like that. "Birdhouse" was this weird song that had the hooks of pop music, but the form was all wrong -- the weird little intro, the fact that it dumps into the chorus instead of a verse, the lyrics that make no sense at first ("I'm your only friend; I'm not your only friend...") but then suddenly snap into place ("... which stood on rocky shores and kept the beaches shipwreck free") as being clever about something without ever being quite sure what it is, etc. That same pattern continued with "Dead" ("I returned a bag of groceries..." is a head scratcher, but then you get a gem like "Now it's over, I'm dead, and I haven't done anything that I want, or I'm still alive and there's nothing I want to do"). There was a geography lesson in "Istanbul (Not Constantinople)" (which I didn't know at the time was a cover), lyrics about how "everybody wants prosthetic foreheads on their real heads," and a song called "Minimum Wage" that sounded like the theme to a deranged Western film of the same name.

It was music that was edgy and strange, but still melodic enough for a pop fan to enjoy (unlike the punk or jam or metal bands that my friends were starting to discover). There was a cleverness and wit to the lyrics that was unlike anything I had heard in my U2 or Pink Floyd or Huey Lewis albums. The little tempo shifts or strange turns of a phrase were things that forced you to pay a little bit of attention to the music ...


I was a DJ back in those years--WUMF, with a pulse pounding 4 and a half watts of PURE POWAH!--and Flood came out in a time when music was in an odd flux. You had NWA going on tour with Anthrax. You had Ice T doing metal with Body Count. There were still acts like Follow for Now and Living Colour, and Old Skool acts like Bad Brains getting back in the mix, proving that indeed the black folks could indeed play some damn guitar, and guys like Mike Franti, formerly of the Beatnigs blowing off the walls of staid conformity in with the Disposable Heroes of the Hiphoprisy showing that you could do lyrically dense hiphop. There were swing acts rolling out, there was Western Swing coming in, Michelle Shocked was rolling in where young gals like Ani DiFranco and Brenda Kahn were just getting started, while gals with guitars were tearing UP stages while folks went nuts. You had techno acts like Ministry, just go balls out nuts and Industrial got a huge pump in the arm. And with all these huge enthusiasm thanks to college radio stations, and the CMJ putting spotlight on a LOT of acts, as opposed to the few per month that the labels were pushing, it meant that you got a lot more diversity on that dial. Social Distortion was blowing the walls off what folks thought of as "rockabilly" and guys like Scruffy the Cat were laying down on the roots of what we call "Americana" today. Robbie Fulks and Todd Snider were cold rolling in HARD into country, and Robert Earl Keen was getting ready for his own run against Nashville.

In all that, with such gusto and enthusiasm, as folks realized that Michael Stipe and REM were just getting odd, and the same way with the Smashing Pumpkins, and Trent Raznor were about to take a solid turn into Deep Pretentiousville, you had folks like Wally Pleasant, like TMBG, and a few others, who came into the mix with all that enthusiasm and gusto, with incredibly dense and savvy lyrics, that pushed for attention by their offbeatness, and that was a time when EVERYONE was doing something different. And TMBG captured an offbeatness that was coupled with very tight and very aware songwriting, and it was slick and very professional, while still with all that verve. Wally...his strength was odd songs, with a huge amount of heart, and his awkwardness and self effacement didn't really fit the airwaves, but his songs were brilliant. In the same way that you had songwriter Don Henry actually perform his own damn songs for a change, and it was brilliant stuff. His version of Harley and Where Have You Been, I can't play often. Not because they're not as good as the originals, but because they rip my guts out every damn time, and I'd rather not find myself bawling at my computer when iTunes trips over them at random.

It was a great time for music, because there was so much damn experimentation. So much enthusiasm, and so many new venues for folks to try. It was also right before the studios rose up to swallow as many successful acts, and winnow the fields, because there was just too damn much going on. And it led to some very cool places. Some great acts got their start, and TMBG made it through the crucible, and stayed true, and didn't get themselves a slick deal, and sell out their sound, and for that I'm grateful. A lot of guys got their chance, and went back to the road, and doing things their way again--like Robbie Fulks and Todd Snider, who are still touring and doing some amazing shows.

I blame the late 80s and 90s for the fact that I play bluegrass, punk, Industrial, folk, jazz, swing, Americana, hiphop, ska, and dancehall on the same damn mix, because that is a snapshot of the time. It wasn't just one scene, it was a lot of scenes all crashing together, and it was glorious, because it gave a lot of folks the freedom to just put their stuff out there.
 
2014-02-13 07:50:15 PM  

Uzzah: Raise your hand if you ever called Dial-A-Song...

*raises hand*


here, too
 
2014-02-13 07:52:30 PM  
For those who have been into TMBG a long time and have kids, they have some fantastic kids videos.. so many good ones from the Here Come the 123s/ABCs/Science albums.

Pretty much all on youtube, watching one of them right now

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nCTGHqN7JME
 
2014-02-13 08:07:11 PM  

Cytokine Storm: [i.imgur.com image 400x676]

/amazon


We've got one in our bathroom. Flood is a great album, thanks for the link Subby.
 
2014-02-13 08:11:43 PM  

Cytokine Storm: [i.imgur.com image 400x676]

/amazon


And Think Geek. I've got one, and I sent my sister one for her birthday last year.
 
2014-02-13 08:12:55 PM  

BilldaCat10: For those who have been into TMBG a long time and have kids, they have some fantastic kids videos.. so many good ones from the Here Come the 123s/ABCs/Science albums.

Pretty much all on youtube, watching one of them right now

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nCTGHqN7JME


"Oh, the sun is a mass
Of incandescent gas,
A gigantic nuclear furnace..."

/TMBG and Barenaked Ladies put out some of the best kids' music around
 
2014-02-13 08:20:34 PM  

docmattic: BilldaCat10: For those who have been into TMBG a long time and have kids, they have some fantastic kids videos.. so many good ones from the Here Come the 123s/ABCs/Science albums.

Pretty much all on youtube, watching one of them right now

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nCTGHqN7JME

"Oh, the sun is a mass
Of incandescent gas,
A gigantic nuclear furnace..."

/TMBG and Barenaked Ladies put out some of the best kids' music around


No, no, no. The Sun is a miasma of incandescent plasma.
 
2014-02-13 08:23:38 PM  

Uzzah: kroonermanblack: Can you explain how it changed anything? Music to me is just sort of disposable like, say, electronics.  Sure, there are people out there who collect specific bits and bobbles, but I've never heard anyone say 'this keyboard changed my life' and understood it. So I'm asking politely.

I can't speak for lostcat, but I will say that "Flood" came out my freshman year in college, after an adolescence that primarily involved listening to '80s pop and '60-'70s classic rock -- music that wasn't particularly out to challenge you.

"Flood" wasn't like that. "Birdhouse" was this weird song that had the hooks of pop music, but the form was all wrong -- the weird little intro, the fact that it dumps into the chorus instead of a verse, the lyrics that make no sense at first ("I'm your only friend; I'm not your only friend...") but then suddenly snap into place ("... which stood on rocky shores and kept the beaches shipwreck free") as being clever about something without ever being quite sure what it is, etc. That same pattern continued with "Dead" ("I returned a bag of groceries..." is a head scratcher, but then you get a gem like "Now it's over, I'm dead, and I haven't done anything that I want, or I'm still alive and there's nothing I want to do"). There was a geography lesson in "Istanbul (Not Constantinople)" (which I didn't know at the time was a cover), lyrics about how "everybody wants prosthetic foreheads on their real heads," and a song called "Minimum Wage" that sounded like the theme to a deranged Western film of the same name.

It was music that was edgy and strange, but still melodic enough for a pop fan to enjoy (unlike the punk or jam or metal bands that my friends were starting to discover). There was a cleverness and wit to the lyrics that was unlike anything I had heard in my U2 or Pink Floyd or Huey Lewis albums. The little tempo shifts or strange turns of a phrase were things that forced you to pay a little bit of attention to the music ...


thewoebegonewoods.files.wordpress.com
 
2014-02-13 08:33:18 PM  
scienceblogs.com


static2.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2014-02-13 08:54:39 PM  

BilldaCat10: For those who have been into TMBG a long time and have kids, they have some fantastic kids videos.. so many good ones from the Here Come the 123s/ABCs/Science albums.

Pretty much all on youtube, watching one of them right now

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nCTGHqN7JME


I got the ABC and 123 ones for my niece and nephew last year and they absolutely love them.

Funny thing was they randomly popped up on my Amazon Cloud one day when they decided to gave you the mp3 of an album if you bought the physical copy.  So now I'll pop them on every once and a while, they are insanely catchy songs.

/Oh no, no, I never go to work, oh no, no, I never go to work...
 
2014-02-13 09:05:39 PM  
Well, now I know what I'm loading up on XMPlay after the Nitin Sawhney playlist is done.
 
zez
2014-02-13 09:14:52 PM  
I don't know how many times i've seen them total, but they loved to come to St. Louis and i once caught them 5 times in one week including 3 concerts in one day.

My kids (5&9) really love them too, too bad they don't seem to perform all ages shows any more.
 
2014-02-13 09:16:41 PM  

hubiestubert: Mike Franti


My ex-girlfriend was roommates with him for a while.

/csb
 
2014-02-13 09:19:50 PM  
As much as I love TMBG, they've always been hit or miss for me. But I have to live them anyways, just for songs like You're on Fire, and the actress they got to dance around in a sundress while cooking for the video.
 
2014-02-13 09:34:17 PM  
Their iPhone app is awesome.
5 free rotating songs every week.

/TMBG will be one of the first bands I introduce my daughter too
 
2014-02-13 10:24:16 PM  
Whenever a website asks me to create a username, "Countless Screaming Argonauts" is a common choice for me.
 
2014-02-13 10:50:25 PM  

marcre3363: Uzzah: kroonermanblack: Can you explain how it changed anything? Music to me is just sort of disposable like, say, electronics.  Sure, there are people out there who collect specific bits and bobbles, but I've never heard anyone say 'this keyboard changed my life' and understood it. So I'm asking politely.

I can't speak for lostcat, but I will say that "Flood" came out my freshman year in college, after an adolescence that primarily involved listening to '80s pop and '60-'70s classic rock -- music that wasn't particularly out to challenge you.

"Flood" wasn't like that. "Birdhouse" was this weird song that had the hooks of pop music, but the form was all wrong -- the weird little intro, the fact that it dumps into the chorus instead of a verse, the lyrics that make no sense at first ("I'm your only friend; I'm not your only friend...") but then suddenly snap into place ("... which stood on rocky shores and kept the beaches shipwreck free") as being clever about something without ever being quite sure what it is, etc. That same pattern continued with "Dead" ("I returned a bag of groceries..." is a head scratcher, but then you get a gem like "Now it's over, I'm dead, and I haven't done anything that I want, or I'm still alive and there's nothing I want to do"). There was a geography lesson in "Istanbul (Not Constantinople)" (which I didn't know at the time was a cover), lyrics about how "everybody wants prosthetic foreheads on their real heads," and a song called "Minimum Wage" that sounded like the theme to a deranged Western film of the same name.

It was music that was edgy and strange, but still melodic enough for a pop fan to enjoy (unlike the punk or jam or metal bands that my friends were starting to discover). There was a cleverness and wit to the lyrics that was unlike anything I had heard in my U2 or Pink Floyd or Huey Lewis albums. The little tempo shifts or strange turns of a phrase were things that forced you to pay a little bit of attention to the music ...

Better put than me.

I remember buying this CD in a "Get 10 albums for $.01" Columbia House offers. It was the best CD of the bunch.

The album was like nothing I've seen before or after. And even the songs I hate on it are fantastic.


You have a medal from saint peter declaring you the nicest of the damned
 
2014-02-13 11:02:29 PM  
I was utterly unaware of TMBG when they hit. I got turned on to them some time in the mid 00's.
Great band with a great attitude. More power to 'em.
 
2014-02-13 11:14:29 PM  

jso2897: I was utterly unaware of TMBG when they hit. I got turned on to them some time in the mid 00's.
Great band with a great attitude. More power to 'em.


Great attitude is exactly it. When I was with the Iron Horse Entertainment Group, we did a LOT of TMBG shows, and they were one of our favorite acts to deal with.

Their crowd? Not so much. Not because they were a pain in the ass, but because they were just so damn clueless about a lot of show etiquette. Very excited, very upbeat, very friendly--and for God's sake, at least don't flash that tiny ass pinner in front of the damn room, especially when the Sheriff is coming in to check how the show's going. At least try to hide the damn things. Go in the bathroom, head to the emergency exit, smoke that sh*t in the car BEFORE you roll in. We hated to bust these kids, but damnation, they made it hard...
 
2014-02-13 11:44:17 PM  

hubiestubert: jso2897: I was utterly unaware of TMBG when they hit. I got turned on to them some time in the mid 00's.
Great band with a great attitude. More power to 'em.

Great attitude is exactly it. When I was with the Iron Horse Entertainment Group, we did a LOT of TMBG shows, and they were one of our favorite acts to deal with.

Their crowd? Not so much. Not because they were a pain in the ass, but because they were just so damn clueless about a lot of show etiquette. Very excited, very upbeat, very friendly--and for God's sake, at least don't flash that tiny ass pinner in front of the damn room, especially when the Sheriff is coming in to check how the show's going. At least try to hide the damn things. Go in the bathroom, head to the emergency exit, smoke that sh*t in the car BEFORE you roll in. We hated to bust these kids, but damnation, they made it hard...


The one show I was at it seemed like the band had to stop every couple of songs to tell people to back up because folks in the front were in danger of being crushed.
 
2014-02-13 11:45:08 PM  

BilldaCat10: For those who have been into TMBG a long time and have kids, they have some fantastic kids videos.. so many good ones from the Here Come the 123s/ABCs/Science albums.

Pretty much all on youtube, watching one of them right now

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nCTGHqN7JME


They won a Grammy for Here Come the 123s and were nominated for one for Here Comes the Science.
 
2014-02-13 11:53:27 PM  
This song was the recessional at our wedding.  It was the only one we could think of that was weird enough for us, but still had the right celebratory sound.  I've seen TMBG once when they came through Easthampton Mass, and really loved it.  They called Emily Dickinson from beyond the grave, and marveled at how the main E-Ho intersection becomes a pedestrian free for all every few minutes.
 
2014-02-14 12:14:28 AM  
Flood is an awesome album.
 
2014-02-14 12:18:24 AM  
This reminds me of living in Richmond, VA.
 
2014-02-14 01:56:34 AM  
TMBG is one of the few bands to make it to the "Rock God Geniuses" category of my officially unofficial music classification system.

Other categories include "shiat", "Tolerable" and "Stuff I may have to listen to should I end up in Hell"
 
2014-02-14 03:19:31 AM  
As a young, black nerd girl in white suburbia, TMBG were probably my best friends in high school.
 
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