Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(NPR)   Fresh fruits and veggies sell out in former fast-food-choked neighborhoods. Just kidding, people skip the salad and keep on gobbling Big Macs   (npr.org ) divider line
    More: Obvious, Big Macs, food deserts, Boyle Heights, fruits, salads, Tropical Medicine  
•       •       •

6042 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 Feb 2014 at 12:17 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Archived thread
2014-02-11 12:33:14 AM  
8 votes:
Here's a fun idea: Let's change the way the government subsidizes food so that a Big Mac costs $8 and 2,000 calories worth of salad costs $1.99
2014-02-11 12:56:20 AM  
7 votes:
Well, there's another reason poor people are fat, but you'd have to have been poor to know it.

Fat (as in grease), starch and sugar make you feel full and keep you going through the day, take the edge off your hunger, stop the kids from whining; but they don't do squat for your "nutritional" levels. When I was poor, I used to live for a week on half a gallon of ice cream--a couple spoonfuls in the morning would make me think I wasn't hungry until nearly noon. Throw in some caffeine and bread and I'd never eat anything else. Of course, I was tired and surly all the time, but I wasn't hungry. (I wasn't fat, but that was due to the meth)

So poor people eat a lot of starchy, greasy foods because it fills the stomach; sugar and caffeine (coffee, candy bars) give you the energy you need to keep going on such nutrient-poor fare); and all those empty calories make you fat unless you're a meth-head. Add some beer on the weekends to give you a reason to keep living. That's pretty much the poverty diet. Kids: Give 'em french fries and tater tots to fill their little tummies, washed down with plenty of sweet soda and you'll never hear a word out of them.

Of course, they're unhealthy and have oily hair and pasty complexions and bad teeth and rotten dispositions--but being poor and working two jobs or having four kids who need to eat SOMETHING forces you to do whatever you can to pay the bills. And starchy, greasy, sugary foods are it.
2014-02-11 12:47:48 AM  
5 votes:

fusillade762: But more than that, he says, many people, particularly in low-income food deserts, just aren't used to buying or preparing healthy meals

I think only in America will you find poor people who don't know how to cook.


America is one of the few places that poor people have the luxury of not having to know how to cook.  In most of the world the destitute don't have a McDonalds, KFC, and Little Caesars around the block.  If they did, they'd probably develop eating habits very similar to the poor in the US - fast food places are exceptionally good at providing a lot of calories on the cheap.

Providing access to healthy food is an important step, but it has to be combined with education on how to prepare the stuff and why it's important to do so.  Cooking anything takes more time and effort than walking up to a counter and buying a fully prepared meal.   A single parent working two jobs while trying to raise a couple of kids doesn't have a lot of free time to play in the kitchen.

Added to that they may not even have the necessary pots, pans, utensils and pantry ingredients to turn raw foods into a tasty dinner.
2014-02-11 12:25:15 AM  
5 votes:

shtychkn: fusillade762: But more than that, he says, many people, particularly in low-income food deserts, just aren't used to buying or preparing healthy meals

I think only in America will you find poor people who don't know how to cook.

Its a testament to how well off America really is.


more like a testament to how farked up our ag subsidies are
2014-02-11 12:44:07 AM  
4 votes:

blindpreacher: Proof that poor people are poor by choice. If they aren't even motivated enough to practice proper nutrition then they really are to blame for their own circumstances.


Thanks to our corporatist government and greedy, corner-cutting corporations, fast food prices are artificially low, while fresh food prices have risen. And since poor peoples' wages are so low (and many have to work multiple jobs just to keep a roof over their head), they simply can't afford the money OR time it takes to eat healthy.

But thanks for proving my "Idiots use obesity as a reason to justify their hatred for poor people" point.
2014-02-11 12:28:28 AM  
4 votes:

shtychkn: fusillade762: But more than that, he says, many people, particularly in low-income food deserts, just aren't used to buying or preparing healthy meals

I think only in America will you find poor people who don't know how to cook.

Its a testament to how well off America really is.


Or that American corporations keep their food cheap by cutting corners however they can, while American wages stagnate and food prices continue to rise.  Not to mention that many poor people have to work more than one job, so they simply don't have the time or energy to prepare a meal.

"Poor people are fat" is on the same level as "Poor people have refrigerators". It's a convenient statistic that idiots like to use (without knowing the full context) so they feel better about their politicians shiatting on the poor.
2014-02-11 12:20:54 AM  
4 votes:
White people spend a lot of time of worrying about poor people. It takes up a pretty significant portion of their day.
They feel guilty and sad that poor people shop at Wal*Mart instead of Whole Foods, that they vote Republican instead of Democratic, that they go to Community College/get a job instead of studying art at a University.
It is a poorly guarded secret that, deep down, white people believe if given money and education that all poor people would be EXACTLY like them. In fact, the only reason that poor people make the choices they do is because they have not been given the means to make the right choices and care about the right things.
A great way to make white people feel good is to tell them about situations where poor people changed how they were doing things because they were given the 'whiter' option. "Back in my old town, people used to shop at Wal*Mart and then this non-profit organization came in and set up a special farmers co-op so that we could buy more local produce, and within two weeks the Wal*Mart shut down and we elected our first Democratic representative in 40 years." White people will first ask which non-profit and are they hiring? After that, they will be filled with euphoria and will invite you to more parties to tell this story to their friends, so that they can feel great.
But it is ESSENTIAL that you reassert that poor people do not make decisions based on free will. That news could crush white people and their hope for the future.
2014-02-11 12:02:58 AM  
4 votes:
But more than that, he says, many people, particularly in low-income food deserts, just aren't used to buying or preparing healthy meals

I think only in America will you find poor people who don't know how to cook.
2014-02-11 04:37:03 AM  
3 votes:

elysive: brimed03: elysive: If you truly believe these people cant cook (because of time or whatever other factors), then there's not much hope for poor people left in this topic. I guess they're just stuck eating what fast food restaurants choose to sell them on the cheap.

Until very recently, and extending back for years, there was ONE food supermarket in the entire city of Newark, NJ.

ONE.

I should know, I shopped there semi-regularly. Thankfully, I had a car, because there were no train lines nearby. No car? You carried what you could on the bus. Assuming you had the time to take a bus from across the city.

I bet you smirked at your own cleverness when you wrote "those poor Americans living in food deserts in Japan."

You truly know nothing.

But what does that have to do with making time to cook? I'm sorry for your lack of supermarkets and I'm sorry I tried to make a quip about doglover (who may have never made any comments about making time to cook so it was probably off topic).

But back to the excuse in the OP where you seemed to have the problem...not making time. I've gleaned from your posts that apparently poor people dont have time or possessions with which to watch TV or check facebook. They arent normal people insofar that they like trivial things, recreate, relax or waste time. There's no free time to be had for poor people to reallocate to cooking and financial trade-offs arent an option (like quitting part time jobs or reducing overtime). Even though I've been under the poverty line (and poverty isnt rare, over half of all American households will experience poverty), I know nothing. Got it.

So do enlighten me based on these new assumptions. How will fixing food deserts like Newark by providing more supermarkets help poor people when they dont have time to cook?
I assumed by your name that you were a med student or doctor or something. Do you think that a person diagnosed with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes, when told to stop eating fast food, would just reply "I dont have time to cook" and that's the end of the conversation? The funny thing about major health problems is that people often find time, or seemingly create it out of thin air when they previously were adament about having none.


K, it's just past 3:30am here and not all the synapses are firing, but I'll give this a shot.

Yep, poor people have tv's. They also have refrigerators, as Fox news so helpfully pointed out a while back. Not as many as you think, however, have Facebook or, indeed, computers.

In fact, if I wasn't on mobile I'd link you to an article recently written by a Hopkins adjunct professor who lives in Baltimore public housing and is the only one he knows with a smart phone; as he puts it, his neighbors don't even know what a "selfie" is, much less have the ability to take one. See, in Baltimore, they beat you up or even kill you--we had 16 murders in the first two weeks of the year-- for your smart phone, because there are 12 automated kiosks in the state (including two in B'more itself) where you can turn them in for cash.

So now, maybe, you have a very slightly better notion of what it means to be urban poor, ghetto poor, and not merely "under the poverty line." There is a difference, and it is vast.

Ok, so your point was about time. Here's the thing: most of the poor in these areas are working two to three jobs just to feed the kids. Not nice jobs, either, and by "nice" I mean covered by Fair Labor laws. They're doing backbreaking per diem construction work starting at 6am. Whenever that ends, they take a bus home-- an hour or more, the Baltimore MTA isn't called "May Take Awhile" for nothing-- and grab a quick shower and change before taking the next bus--another hour-- to the next job... maybe washing dishes and being treated like shiat in the back of some restaurant where they can smell the food for 8 hours but will get fired if they eat any of it. When that ends, they might go home to catch five hours' sleep before starting over. The one good thing about the bus is that they can get a little extra sleep during that long ride-- although I wouldn't recommend it on most routes, particularly the infamous "Eight Ball."

His wife, of course, is at home minding the kids. Just kidding, she works as a cashier at the Dunkin Donuts-- we won't go into the gunpoint robberies she's endured-- and also cleans offices in the evenings.

They also have kids who, frankly, help raise each other. The grandparents help. The good folks in the neighborhood tries to keep an eye out.

And when they are home, exhausted and perpetually burned out, they might indulge in the luxury of watching a little mindless tv. Which you, apparently, would have them forgo in favor of cooking nice fresh meals. Except, of course, that the nearest supermarket is eight miles away. Another hour's trip, by bus. Each way. Remember, *the bus is not a car: it does not come when you want it to, and it does not stop only where you need it to.* And, yes, Might Take Awhile.

And no, they can't quit these jobs. They have rent to pay. Utilities. The kids need clothes and school supplies. Some kind of food has to be provided. And-- lol-- health insurance? Yeah. The ER bills have to get paid.

Is this every ghetto family's situation? Of course not. These are the lucky ones. Many of the others can't find jobs. So they have no money for jobs, no money for groceries. No home cookin' for them.

Eliminating the food deserts won't help all of them. The economic problem is so much more complex than that. But it is *one piece,* one very important piece. It's a vital healthy option for those with enough resources-- money to buy, additional family members to do the cooking.

No, the -med in my username isn't for a medical degree, so I'm not going to address your question there except in the list general way. Do you actuality know this person you're talking about? Is this someone both real and known to you? Or is this someone you "know" exists because... well, because. Did you ever question where you got this image from, much less bother to find out, before you accepted it, if it's valid?
2014-02-11 01:01:33 AM  
3 votes:

shtychkn: fusillade762: But more than that, he says, many people, particularly in low-income food deserts, just aren't used to buying or preparing healthy meals

I think only in America will you find poor people who don't know how to cook.

Its a testament to how well off America really is.


It's also a testament to how shiatty hours can be, especially for those that rely on public transport. I like to cook, but on days where I work "8 to 4" I find it very difficult (because I have a 2+ hour commute by city bus each way, and come home utterly exhausted at 6:30pm). Other days I work "6:30 to 4" but get to ride the company bus back, which means I actually get home at 4:30-5. If I plan it well I have leftovers, or I have an easy meal like sardines with salad. If I'm too tired and haven't been shopping? I eat out. Sucks but I will pay the money to keep myself fed and healthy.

Other people work even more than me, like people having two jobs. They eat where they can.

That said, there ARE options. Most people in America that eat badly do so mainly because they have no idea what healthy eating is. It actually can be as simple as getting a cold cut 6 inch with all the veggies from Subway instead of a Big Mac and fries (there are a LOT of Subways now, its as common as mcdonalds). It can mean getting unsweetened ice tea instead of a soft drink or sweet tea.

I could go on about this topic but I don't need to talk more about the obvious. I think most people on Fark are educated enough to understand basic nutrition. Many people, far more than the educated realize, have absolutely no concept of nutrition. Like, eating fruits and vegetables is a foreign concept level bad. Even when they DO cook, it's going to be something bad for them or missing basic nutrition, like rice with spam or mac and cheese.
2014-02-11 01:00:44 AM  
3 votes:

Notabunny: Here's a fun idea: Let's change the way the government subsidizes food so that a Big Mac costs $8 and 2,000 calories worth of salad costs $1.99


I'd be ok with fixing this.

www.pcrm.org

Full disclosure, my wife is very involved in food policy, and by extension I am because I help her with research and she is getting real tired of the elitist attitude she runs into towards our poorer part of town.

The general attitude from a few of these people is, um, not exactly good towards the lower class.  They want a Market of Choice (think Whole Foods) or some local independent organic grocer, we'd be happy with something far more basic and cheap, because we're realists, and know that there we need incentives to get one there, and the incentives for a high end grocer will be greater than for a lower end grocer.  There already would be a grocery store in one of our food deserts if the demand was there, and but it would still not be a Whole Foods.

In all likelihood I suspect what will end up there is one of the Walmart Neighborhood Market.

the801: meat0918:
Also, get the kids at the school some ideas on fresh foods.  Hook 'em while they're young.


[wp-b.com image 350x300]  [cdn.niketalk.com image 350x263]



Here is some of what my kids' school district serves from their Facebook page, and the menus are standardized across the district.

i.imgur.com
i.imgur.com
2014-02-11 12:53:47 AM  
3 votes:

elysive: Notabunny: ReapTheChaos: I've been seeing these "lets end food deserts" ads on TV quite a bit and I've been wondering where exactly are the grocery store that don't sell vegetables? I've been to stores in some pretty poor neighborhoods and I've never seen one that didn't. Even if their selection of fresh produce was limited, they always have frozen, which for most vegetables is just as healthy as fresh.

The problem isn't access to healthy food, it's getting people to change their habits. If you didn't grow up eating vegetables and healthy food then your not likely to do it as an adult.

I know anecdotal evidence is flimsy, but I work in downtown Stockton, CA. and I'm willing to make a bet. Let's stand on the steps of City Hall, and I'll give you an hour to walk to a store and buy lettuce, carrots, potatoes, bananas, apples, a gallon of milk, and then walk back. I know that within 20 minutes you can get a payday loan and buy a fifth of Jack, but that's a different bet.

In downtown Chicago, you could get the apples, bananas, carrots and milk in less than ten minutes thanks to the wide selection of fresh food at Walgreens and 7-11. Could probably get eggs and a pre-made salad too.


At 7-11 a smallish salad is $4.  For that same $4 you could buy 4 big-ass microwave burritos at the same store, or 4 double cheeseburgers at McDonalds.

Crap food is just plain cheaper, and for those who are living in poverty, the math often doesn't add up.
2014-02-11 12:28:18 AM  
3 votes:
"Fast food is cheaper and easier to consume than healthy food." - Ric Romero
2014-02-11 09:25:34 AM  
2 votes:

doglover: Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Fast food places aren't in the business of making people healthy.

I can't smoke stogies in the maternity ward, even if one of the kids is allegedly mine, and you're tellin' me we can't pass a law where you have to provide apples to keep your vendor's license in city limits?


More laws are not the answer.

All you would get is:

a) Apples would because a heavily regulated item, and cost $8-$12 at a grocery store.  "Free" at McDonalds.

b) College students, dopers and old hippies would start protests that they have a "right" to apples.

c)  Chuck Schumer would introduce legislation to heavily tax all other fruit.

d) Metric shiat-tons of apples would be thrown away.

e)  More legislation would be hastily written to regulate disposal of apples.
        e-1) A bunch of other shiat would be thrown in the legislation that would fark some other aspect of our lives up to an incredible degree.

Seriously... Stop with the regulation already.  How about, "If people want to buy apples, they should just BUY FARKING APPLES".
2014-02-11 01:11:54 AM  
2 votes:

meat0918: fusillade762: But more than that, he says, many people, particularly in low-income food deserts, just aren't used to buying or preparing healthy meals

I think only in America will you find poor people who don't know how to cook.

Nah, Britain and Canada too.


Price inflation couples with wage stagnation. The poor, already Just Getting By, now can't afford basic groceries. Theft occurs because the kids gotta eat (see also: The Grapes of Wrath) and corporate supermarkets pull out. Urban "food deserts" are populated by oases of fast food restaurants. The poor find themselves in a new world detached from old, kitchen-based concepts of creating nutritional value and devoid of new guideposts in the fast food places. An entire generation later, a monumental effort by some legislators provides a feeble requirement of posting caloric values. Meaningless to the poor who are not provided with any educational context for healthy eating-- no, not even in the schools.

And then we're surprised or, sadly, smug, when the poor don't choose the chef salad over the Whopper.
2014-02-11 01:05:04 AM  
2 votes:

Corvus: fusillade762: But more than that, he says, many people, particularly in low-income food deserts, just aren't used to buying or preparing healthy meals

I think only in America will you find poor people who don't know how to cook.

We also need programs that reach out to these neighborhoods to teach people how to cook and eat better.


And how to get transportation to places that sell those foods that are long distance from where they live.

/Hint that is a food desert. No Aldi's or even a Piggly Wggly there.
2014-02-11 01:04:41 AM  
2 votes:
When your life is shiat, sometimes you turn to things to make you feel better.

Sometimes people turn to drink, it helps them get by when their lives are crap.

Sometimes people turn to drugs, it helps them escape the reality that their lives are crap.

Sometimes people turn to food, it gives them something to look forward to when everything is shiat.

I don't know why when people talk about poverty and nutrition they don't bring up this last point. Do they just want to pretend that people aren't addicted to shiatty food? Are we going to pretend that shiatty food doesn't press all the buttons in our little monkey brains that make us want more of it? Are we going to ignore that when you're poor as fark, probably the only "treat" you can give yourself is junk food?

I really don't get why no one wants to talk about it. It's farking obvious. Being poor sucks.
2014-02-11 01:01:05 AM  
2 votes:

albuquerquehalsey: White people spend a lot of time of worrying about poor people. It takes up a pretty significant portion of their day.
They feel guilty and sad that poor people shop at Wal*Mart instead of Whole Foods, that they vote Republican instead of Democratic, that they go to Community College/get a job instead of studying art at a University.
It is a poorly guarded secret that, deep down, white people believe if given money and education that all poor people would be EXACTLY like them. In fact, the only reason that poor people make the choices they do is because they have not been given the means to make the right choices and care about the right things.
A great way to make white people feel good is to tell them about situations where poor people changed how they were doing things because they were given the 'whiter' option. "Back in my old town, people used to shop at Wal*Mart and then this non-profit organization came in and set up a special farmers co-op so that we could buy more local produce, and within two weeks the Wal*Mart shut down and we elected our first Democratic representative in 40 years." White people will first ask which non-profit and are they hiring? After that, they will be filled with euphoria and will invite you to more parties to tell this story to their friends, so that they can feel great.
But it is ESSENTIAL that you reassert that poor people do not make decisions based on free will. That news could crush white people and their hope for the future.


You've truly never seen a food desert have you? Let's put it this way Walmarts are an hour or more away by bus being out in the 'burbs.
2014-02-11 12:57:34 AM  
2 votes:
It's not money, it's education.

I try to provide my kids with fresh foods but when I'm out of money, I can only provide what I can.

HOWEVER, that is not McDonald's.  I keep rice and dried vegetables for emergencies (yeah, it's not delicious but it's survivable) and I never cook with a microwave.  There are foods we can get inexpensively and retrieve the benefits.

The dried veggie packs from those noodle bowls go great with rice, ground turkey and some frozen peas and carrots in a rice cooker.

Noodles without the flavor packs go great with the $5.00 breaded chicken breasts and frozen peas and carrots.

So many poor recipes I can share.  (Two kids, single dad, paying alimony but get no child support...)

Yeah, it's not fresh, but at least it's not McDonald's.
2014-02-11 12:52:49 AM  
2 votes:
Might have something to do with taste. Veggies are mostly blech, while meat and cheese and a deep fryer are tasty, tasty.

You'd have to rewire brains to make broccoli and cabbage taste as good as a cheeseburger. With bacon.

www.rawfoodlife.com
2014-02-11 12:29:09 AM  
2 votes:
I've been seeing these "lets end food deserts" ads on TV quite a bit and I've been wondering where exactly are the grocery store that don't sell vegetables? I've been to stores in some pretty poor neighborhoods and I've never seen one that didn't. Even if their selection of fresh produce was limited, they always have frozen, which for most vegetables is just as healthy as fresh.

The problem isn't access to healthy food, it's getting people to change their habits. If you didn't grow up eating vegetables and healthy food then your not likely to do it as an adult.
2014-02-11 01:57:42 PM  
1 vote:

MemeSlave: Muta: liam76: While crockpot and oatmeal are cheap, the prep takes planning. Something that is tougher to do when you are poor and stressed.

100% true which is why I feel the lack of education is the root cause of the nutrition problem in cities.  There is a lack of understanding that a little time investment when making something in a crock-pot saves both time and money through out the week.

And why is that anyone else's problem?


Because most people aren't ok with a "fark the poor" mentality in the richest ountry in the world.

Even if you are fine with adults doing shiat liek this, you should have a sliver of compassion for the kids who should be taugth another way, but maybe not.
2014-02-11 01:55:15 PM  
1 vote:

WhoGAS: It's not money, it's education.

I try to provide my kids with fresh foods but when I'm out of money, I can only provide what I can.

HOWEVER, that is not McDonald's.  I keep rice and dried vegetables for emergencies (yeah, it's not delicious but it's survivable) and I never cook with a microwave.  There are foods we can get inexpensively and retrieve the benefits.

The dried veggie packs from those noodle bowls go great with rice, ground turkey and some frozen peas and carrots in a rice cooker.

Noodles without the flavor packs go great with the $5.00 breaded chicken breasts and frozen peas and carrots.

So many poor recipes I can share.  (Two kids, single dad, paying alimony but get no child support...)

Yeah, it's not fresh, but at least it's not McDonald's.


You need a lawyer, or a children's advocate, via the child support program.
You shouldn't be paying alimony, if you have child placement and aren't getting child support.
Document the time that you spend with your kid and if you can prove you have them for over 50% of the year, through said documentation and bills, then you can take it to a adjudicator and have your custody arrangement reassessed.
After that is reassessed, you can go to your local child support agency, and have them review your support agreement with your ex.
They will review your income, and your ex's(including her alimony) and will either arrange so that you get a lawyer to not have to pay out alimony, or you get a lien established on your ex, so that any tax refunds or other income they earn has to contribute to said support.

Theoretically, any check you send to your ex could have the child support deducted from it.
2014-02-11 01:50:18 PM  
1 vote:
www.uwec.edu

Gee, I wonder why?
2014-02-11 11:23:13 AM  
1 vote:

ReapTheChaos: I've been seeing these "lets end food deserts" ads on TV quite a bit and I've been wondering where exactly are the grocery store that don't sell vegetables? I've been to stores in some pretty poor neighborhoods and I've never seen one that didn't. Even if their selection of fresh produce was limited, they always have frozen, which for most vegetables is just as healthy as fresh.

The problem isn't access to healthy food, it's getting people to change their habits. If you didn't grow up eating vegetables and healthy food then your not likely to do it as an adult.


Ditto. My roommate refuses to eat veggies (other than potatoes and corn) because he's been fending for himself since he was a kid. He's basically Jake Peralta from Brooklyn 99.

Moreover, we're not considering the following factors:

Time - if you working 3 jobs you aren't going to have any prep time

Freezer space - No bulk purchasing if you don't have freezer and fridge space

Knowledge - making healthy food taste good is an art

Self-Medication/Decision Fatigue - being poor sucks, even the strongest among us are going to be depressed and stressed as all hell. So you either self-medicate the depression away and/or you run out of willpower at the end of the day and get a Big Mac because you're hungry and tired dammit.
2014-02-11 10:51:23 AM  
1 vote:

Muta: liam76: While crockpot and oatmeal are cheap, the prep takes planning. Something that is tougher to do when you are poor and stressed.

100% true which is why I feel the lack of education is the root cause of the nutrition problem in cities.  There is a lack of understanding that a little time investment when making something in a crock-pot saves both time and money through out the week.


It goes a bit beyond education. Even with that knowledge putting it in practice is going to be tough without a life style change, and that is very tough when peopel work 40hour weeks and can barely get by.
2014-02-11 08:38:26 AM  
1 vote:

Muta: I do think it comes down to education. I say that because I don't buy the 'not enough time' or 'it's too expensive' arguments for cooking healthy at home. With a crock pot you can take 10 minutes in the morning putting together a lentil soup and you've got a great start to a meal that will last all week. A whole chicken usually costs about $1.30/pound and again, to you can cook it all day in the crock pot. Kale is nutrient rich, delicious and dirt cheap. It really does take no time to make a salad. Oatmeal (the stuff out of a cardboard tube, not an instant envelope) costs close to nothing and, since most of its preparation time is waiting for it to steep, takes no time to prepare.


Salads aren't a good option if youare broke.

While crockpot and oatmeal are cheap, the prep takes planning. Something that is tougher to do when you are poor and stressed.

brimed03: Until very recently, and extending back for years, there was ONE food supermarket in the entire city of Newark, NJ.

ONE.

I should know, I shopped there semi-regularly. Thankfully, I had a car, because there were no train lines nearby. No car? You carried what you could on the bus. Assuming you had the time to take a bus from across the city.

I bet you smirked at your own cleverness when you wrote "those poor Americans living in food deserts in Japan."

You truly know nothing


elysive would have loved that. he could have ran to the grocery store to get in his workout, between his three jobs and cooking all meals from scratch.
2014-02-11 07:07:05 AM  
1 vote:
Liberals only understand deductive logic, which is the cause of this idea that increasing the supply of vegetables was the problem.

"People in some lower income neighborhoods have poor health and poor diets because they don't have access to groceries with vegetables"

When the question should be "How many have access and do they purchase vegetables when available?". To which the answer is "a lot" and "often not".

Liberals skip research that doesn't support their assumptions or might actually disprove them.
2014-02-11 06:16:02 AM  
1 vote:

OgreMagi: LordJiro: shtychkn: fusillade762: But more than that, he says, many people, particularly in low-income food deserts, just aren't used to buying or preparing healthy meals

I think only in America will you find poor people who don't know how to cook.

Its a testament to how well off America really is.

Or that American corporations keep their food cheap by cutting corners however they can, while American wages stagnate and food prices continue to rise.  Not to mention that many poor people have to work more than one job, so they simply don't have the time or energy to prepare a meal.

"Poor people are fat" is on the same level as "Poor people have refrigerators". It's a convenient statistic that idiots like to use (without knowing the full context) so they feel better about their politicians shiatting on the poor.

I've been poor to the point that I was eating only because a friend found out I was going days at a time without anything more than ramen.  Yes, if you are fat you aren't farking poor.  If you have a roof over your head and enough food to be fat, you are a damn sight better than most the the world's population.  Hell, the people complaining about being poor also have a big screen tv and a car.  That isn't poor.


cloudfront.mediamatters.org
2014-02-11 05:13:29 AM  
1 vote:
But my point stands. A lot of people in the US go to prison who shouldn't; rather than turning them into lifelong criminals, why not give them the tools to make a difference in their own and other people's lives?
2014-02-11 05:03:06 AM  
1 vote:

Nogale: doglover: Nogale: Not of iron, sadly.

LOLWAT?

[3.bp.blogspot.com image 850x1086]

You're supposed to eat the liver.

Uh, no. Nope. No way. No liver for me, thank you very much.


Can you see the liver in the picture?
No?
Then your mouth won't see it either.

Yakitori is like the best food on earth (except for you)

fark it, that's what the poor need: more yakitori joints.
2014-02-11 04:17:12 AM  
1 vote:

Nogale: Prisons should target non-violent, first-time offenders


And this is what's wrong with America.

We're the only country on Earth that incarcerates non-violent, first time offenders.
2014-02-11 03:20:39 AM  
1 vote:

brimed03: elysive: If you truly believe these people cant cook (because of time or whatever other factors), then there's not much hope for poor people left in this topic. I guess they're just stuck eating what fast food restaurants choose to sell them on the cheap.

Until very recently, and extending back for years, there was ONE food supermarket in the entire city of Newark, NJ.

ONE.

I should know, I shopped there semi-regularly. Thankfully, I had a car, because there were no train lines nearby. No car? You carried what you could on the bus. Assuming you had the time to take a bus from across the city.

I bet you smirked at your own cleverness when you wrote "those poor Americans living in food deserts in Japan."

You truly know nothing.


But what does that have to do with making time to cook? I'm sorry for your lack of supermarkets and I'm sorry I tried to make a quip about doglover (who may have never made any comments about making time to cook so it was probably off topic).

But back to the excuse in the OP where you seemed to have the problem...not making time. I've gleaned from your posts that apparently poor people dont have time or possessions with which to watch TV or check facebook. They arent normal people insofar that they like trivial things, recreate, relax or waste time. There's no free time to be had for poor people to reallocate to cooking and financial trade-offs arent an option (like quitting part time jobs or reducing overtime). Even though I've been under the poverty line (and poverty isnt rare, over half of all American households will experience poverty), I know nothing. Got it.

So do enlighten me based on these new assumptions. How will fixing food deserts like Newark by providing more supermarkets help poor people when they dont have time to cook?
I assumed by your name that you were a med student or doctor or something. Do you think that a person diagnosed with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes, when told to stop eating fast food, would just reply "I dont have time to cook" and that's the end of the conversation? The funny thing about major health problems is that people often find time, or seemingly create it out of thin air when they previously were adament about having none.
2014-02-11 03:16:53 AM  
1 vote:
Ya know, until I was too poor to know if I was going to even eat I never gave serious thought to what I ate. I knew it was "bad" but I never cared.

After not eating for three days, I thought I might as well eat as healthy as I could, even if for only one meal. I LOVE healthy food now. Even if it doesn't titillates my taste buds like fast food all the time, I'm okay with that.

The coolest part is that its just brain programming keeping you eating that stuff. Like a drug addict needing more, harder and faster, fast food floods your senses and gives you what you want and crave. Get off the stuff and suddenly its way better than you remember, or its unbearably sweet/ salty/ etc. The brain is so awesome, huh?

Want to get healthy, truly want, and you'll make it. Im in the middle of a food desert and im poor, but ill be damned if i dont try.

Ill chalk the failure of healthy fast food options failing to both a fundamental misunderstanding of the human (as the free market is wont to do) or a meaningless attempt to look like you care.

/scrambled eggs and jowl bacon is healthy to me
//I need to go to bed so I can more quickly get to cooking
2014-02-11 03:11:22 AM  
1 vote:

mamoru: TuteTibiImperes: If they did, they'd probably develop eating habits very similar to the poor in the US - fast food places are exceptionally good at providing a lot of calories on the cheap.

Granted, this is anecdotal, but in most countries I've been in outside of the USA and especially 2 of the 3 I've lived in (Morocco and currently Thailand), the price of fast food franchise food is often more expensive than the local street food, and the street food is usually much more nutritious and tasty. And, especially here in Thailand, the "dirt poor" are extremely poor, but the local food is usually cheap enough for people to afford reasonable healthy meals.

In places like here in Thailand and in Japan (where I've also lived), eating at places like MacDonald's was often more about being trendy than convenient or cheap.

Yeah, the super-impoverished nations and even many regions of developing nations don't have a MacD's around every other corner, but in my experience, at least some of the ones that do don't fit your generalization. Granted they are good at it in the States, but less so in other parts of the world, especially if they have to compete with local food prices already being extremely cheap just so many people can afford to eat.


The food economies if those countries aren't massively imbalanced by government subsidies for a handful of powerful segments. Hence, fast food costs what it should.

Also, by the sound of it, the overall economies aren't so farked that people haven't the time to cook because they have to work three jobs.

Aaand: in a food desert, there's no such thing as "local food." No supermarkets, and no one's delivering to mom-and-pop restaurants in the ghetto... which is why mom-and-pop restaurants don't exist in the ghetto.
2014-02-11 02:55:07 AM  
1 vote:

Notabunny: Well, my bet was with baconbeard, the dishes are vegetarian because access to fresh produce was the point of the conversation, school cafeterias were chosen because the infrastructure is in place, and focaccia is a yummy bread made doubleplustasty when toasted with olive oil and pesto.


Vegetarian is more expensive than just "with vegetables" school are not set up to double as soup kitchens, and many lawmakers oppose the free lunch philosophically, not just financially.

I think the best idea was to change the subsidies. We pay a TON to cattle people when really we shouldn't. We need more apples, carrots, and aspa- actually no. No asparagus. That shiat stinks.
2014-02-11 02:53:29 AM  
1 vote:

Kraftwerk Orange: brimed03: Notabunny: Here's a fun idea: Let's change the way the government subsidizes food so that a Big Mac costs $8 and 2,000 calories worth of salad costs $1.99

Your newsletter. Do you take subscriptions?

Apparently facebook loves this idea


It's the new "It'll be a great day when education is fully funded and the Pentagon has to hold a bake sale for a new B-52."
2014-02-11 02:51:31 AM  
1 vote:

elysive: brimed03: elysive: doglover: It's not a matter of know, it's a matter of when you work three jobs, you don't have time to shop or cook..

I believe that excuse as much as I believe the "I don't have time for exercise" excuse, spoken after telling me about last night's reality show du jour or trip to the pub. It really is cheaper to cook, so maybe the hypothetical person working three jobs could work fewer hours if he/she streamlined the family food budget.

When I lived on my own and ate out every day, my food budget matched my current household's food budget (multiple people, food cooked from scratch, fancy ingredients like fresh seafood).

Wow. They should drill the depths of your smugness for oil.

Elysive, you know nothing.I'm sorry you dont approve. Or wait, the opposite of that. I have nothing against poor people who dont cook or out of shape people who dont exercise. They probably are enmeshed in very difficult circumstances which make charges hard. I just dont buy the excuses (which may be valid explanations for a rare few, like those poor Americans living in food deserts in Japan, but are otherwise excuses). You help no one by enabling self defeating behaviors and delusional thinking.

If you truly believe these people cant cook (because of time or whatever other factors), then there's not much hope for poor people left in this topic. I guess they're just stuck eating what fast food restaurants choose to sell them on the cheap.


Until very recently, and extending back for years, there was ONE food supermarket in the entire city of Newark, NJ.

ONE.

I should know, I shopped there semi-regularly. Thankfully, I had a car, because there were no train lines nearby. No car? You carried what you could on the bus. Assuming you had the time to take a bus from across the city.

I bet you smirked at your own cleverness when you wrote "those poor Americans living in food deserts in Japan."

You truly know nothing.
2014-02-11 02:43:17 AM  
1 vote:

Clemkadidlefark: Might have something to do with taste. Veggies are mostly blech, while meat and cheese and a deep fryer are tasty, tasty.

You'd have to rewire brains to make broccoli and cabbage taste as good as a cheeseburger. With bacon.

[www.rawfoodlife.com image 360x262]


You have to know how to cook them right, in order to make vegetables more appealing.

You might even save some money by making a meal that uses little meat and more vegetables. The juices from the meat can serve to marinate greens, and make them just as good.

/Broccoli and onions are great for that
//Mushrooms too
///And actually, mushrooms can help use even less meat
2014-02-11 02:12:14 AM  
1 vote:

fusillade762: But more than that, he says, many people, particularly in low-income food deserts, just aren't used to buying or preparing healthy meals

I think only in America will you find poor people who don't know how to cook.


I agree. However there are plenty of poor people in America who know how to cook.

I've had the privilege of living and working all across the country. Consequently I've seen how poor Asian immigrants, poor Mexican immigrants, poor Korean graduate students, poor native Americans, poor white residents of Appalachia and the mid-west and poor black residents of inner cities live and eat. Call it stereotyping, but there are definite patterns associated with the various cultures when it comes to food and personal responsibility. To put it bluntly, poor urban black communities need to get their shiat together when it comes to health. Native Americans and white folks too, but especially the urban black communities.

That said, for many it doesn't matter what you subsidize. Some people are going to eat crap because that's what they want to eat.
2014-02-11 01:55:48 AM  
1 vote:

proteus_b: Notabunny: Here's a fun idea: Let's change the way the government subsidizes food so that a Big Mac costs $8 and 2,000 calories worth of salad costs $1.99

That would take quite a bit of work. Leaves don't have a lot of calories. It's just the way it is.

No matter where you live, it's going to cost more to eat only fresh fruits and vegetables. My girlfriend recently lost some weight and is trying to keep it off by eating only fresh fruits and vegetables. It has pretty much doubled our grocery bill. We don't live in America, and we pretty much never bought any processed foods (other than pasta).

You could hand out the vegetables free of charge to some people and they won't eat them. The whole "food desert" thing is just a mirage for lib-tards to feel better about themselves for being fat.


I'm game, let's try. Let's provide free vegetarian breakfasts, lunches and dinners to all students and their families, and provide free take-home bags of fresh fruits and veggies. Let's utilize school cafeterias as food distribution and cooking education sites. Let's try it for 10 years or so, and see what happens.
2014-02-11 01:46:23 AM  
1 vote:

avanti: When I know I have $50 to sustain myself I will spend it on broccoli.


Good god, I'll never touch broccoli again! Had a bowl of some last month and I felt like I was going to die all that night. My body wanted to go to sleep so very badly, but it was trapped on the john, feeling every single one of those demonic little florets slowly and painfully rasping it's way throughout my intestinal tract.
2014-02-11 01:46:00 AM  
1 vote:

elysive: doglover: It's not a matter of know, it's a matter of when you work three jobs, you don't have time to shop or cook..

I believe that excuse as much as I believe the "I don't have time for exercise" excuse, spoken after telling me about last night's reality show du jour or trip to the pub. It really is cheaper to cook, so maybe the hypothetical person working three jobs could work fewer hours if he/she streamlined the family food budget.

When I lived on my own and ate out every day, my food budget matched my current household's food budget (multiple people, food cooked from scratch, fancy ingredients like fresh seafood).


Wow. They should drill the depths of your smugness for oil.

Elysive, you know nothing.
2014-02-11 01:39:28 AM  
1 vote:

baconbeard: TuteTibiImperes: ReapTheChaos: TuteTibiImperes: fast food places are exceptionally good at providing a lot of calories on the cheap.

When was the last time you paid attention to the price of fast food? That shiat is getting damned expensive. Most burger joints will keep their signature burger (Whopper Big Mac etc.) pretty cheap, but if you get one of the other meals you're blowing the majority of a 10 dollar bill. I wen't to Sonic last week and got a bacon cheese burger meal and a side of cheese sticks and it was $12. I can make a lot of food at home for $12.

Most of the fast food places have a dollar menu that you could feed a family of four on for just over $10.

This doesn't explain the association between obesity and poverty. I don't care where you eat: you ain't gonna get fat by eating a single item off the dollar menu three times a day.


Ramen Noodles - 25 cents per pouch
3 liter generic soda - $1 (I've noticed that no-name grocery stores in poor areas often don't even carry diet soda, and if they do they only have a couple bottles)
Mac and Cheese - $1.29 for the generic family size
Big-ass bag of Generic chips - $2
Little Debbie snack cakes - $1.29
Banquet frozen dinners - 88 cents each
Crappy frozen pizzas - $1 each
Etc.

It's not just the fast food, even when you have access to a grocery store the stuff that's the worst for you is the cheapest.
2014-02-11 01:36:45 AM  
1 vote:

TuteTibiImperes: fusillade762: But more than that, he says, many people, particularly in low-income food deserts, just aren't used to buying or preparing healthy meals

I think only in America will you find poor people who don't know how to cook.

America is one of the few places that poor people have the luxury of not having to know how to cook.  In most of the world the destitute don't have a McDonalds, KFC, and Little Caesars around the block.  If they did, they'd probably develop eating habits very similar to the poor in the US - fast food places are exceptionally good at providing a lot of calories on the cheap.

Providing access to healthy food is an important step, but it has to be combined with education on how to prepare the stuff and why it's important to do so.  Cooking anything takes more time and effort than walking up to a counter and buying a fully prepared meal.   A single parent working two jobs while trying to raise a couple of kids doesn't have a lot of free time to play in the kitchen.

Added to that they may not even have the necessary pots, pans, utensils and pantry ingredients to turn raw foods into a tasty dinner.


I agree with all your points but the first one. Not having to know how to cook is a luxury for the rich only. For the poor, it is a link in the chain of economic slavery. Dependence on fast food means that the poor can't demand time out to shop, cook, and eat a normal meal. It makes them available to work that second or third job that the insatiable economy demands.
2014-02-11 01:30:34 AM  
1 vote:

elysive: so maybe the hypothetical person working three jobs could work fewer hours if he/she streamlined the family food budget.


Those kinds of minimum wage, unskilled labor type jobs generally don't allow people to set their own schedules as they see fit. It's usually more along the lines of, "These are the hours we need you for, either work them or we'll just find some other desperate person who will".
2014-02-11 01:27:18 AM  
1 vote:

TuteTibiImperes: ReapTheChaos: TuteTibiImperes: fast food places are exceptionally good at providing a lot of calories on the cheap.

When was the last time you paid attention to the price of fast food? That shiat is getting damned expensive. Most burger joints will keep their signature burger (Whopper Big Mac etc.) pretty cheap, but if you get one of the other meals you're blowing the majority of a 10 dollar bill. I wen't to Sonic last week and got a bacon cheese burger meal and a side of cheese sticks and it was $12. I can make a lot of food at home for $12.

Most of the fast food places have a dollar menu that you could feed a family of four on for just over $10.


This doesn't explain the association between obesity and poverty. I don't care where you eat: you ain't gonna get fat by eating a single item off the dollar menu three times a day.
2014-02-11 01:24:20 AM  
1 vote:

TuteTibiImperes: ReapTheChaos: TuteTibiImperes: fast food places are exceptionally good at providing a lot of calories on the cheap.

When was the last time you paid attention to the price of fast food? That shiat is getting damned expensive. Most burger joints will keep their signature burger (Whopper Big Mac etc.) pretty cheap, but if you get one of the other meals you're blowing the majority of a 10 dollar bill. I wen't to Sonic last week and got a bacon cheese burger meal and a side of cheese sticks and it was $12. I can make a lot of food at home for $12.

Most of the fast food places have a dollar menu that you could feed a family of four on for just over $10.


Very true.

Feed = feel well-fed, full tummy and non-complaining children. Nutrition optional.
2014-02-11 01:17:36 AM  
1 vote:
Just wait until the poor start trying to eat the rich. Waddling fat people chasing shuffling old people - from a rooftop it'll look like a zombie movie played in reverse.

/Day of the Fed.
2014-02-11 01:16:35 AM  
1 vote:

albuquerquehalsey: White people spend a lot of time of worrying about poor people. It takes up a pretty significant portion of their day.
They feel guilty and sad that poor people shop at Wal*Mart instead of Whole Foods, that they vote Republican instead of Democratic, that they go to Community College/get a job instead of studying art at a University.
It is a poorly guarded secret that, deep down, white people believe if given money and education that all poor people would be EXACTLY like them. In fact, the only reason that poor people make the choices they do is because they have not been given the means to make the right choices and care about the right things.
A great way to make white people feel good is to tell them about situations where poor people changed how they were doing things because they were given the 'whiter' option. "Back in my old town, people used to shop at Wal*Mart and then this non-profit organization came in and set up a special farmers co-op so that we could buy more local produce, and within two weeks the Wal*Mart shut down and we elected our first Democratic representative in 40 years." White people will first ask which non-profit and are they hiring? After that, they will be filled with euphoria and will invite you to more parties to tell this story to their friends, so that they can feel great.
But it is ESSENTIAL that you reassert that poor people do not make decisions based on free will. That news could crush white people and their hope for the future.


Where's that from? I want to know for the next time I need to buy cleverly-written manure for my garden.

/doesn't really have a garden
//better at caring for things that'll let me know if I forget to feed or water them
///slashies in threes, hold the peas
2014-02-11 01:05:23 AM  
1 vote:

doglover: Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Fast food places aren't in the business of making people healthy.

I can't smoke stogies in the maternity ward, even if one of the kids is allegedly mine, and you're tellin' me we can't pass a law where you have to provide apples to keep your vendor's license in city limits?


Hey, if that was on a referendum I'd vote for it.

The sad truth is that until fresh green veggies are less expensive calorie for calorie than corn and grains coontil agribusiness subsidies are reserved) we aren't going to see much of a change.
2014-02-11 01:02:18 AM  
1 vote:

TuteTibiImperes: fast food places are exceptionally good at providing a lot of calories on the cheap.


When was the last time you paid attention to the price of fast food? That shiat is getting damned expensive. Most burger joints will keep their signature burger (Whopper Big Mac etc.) pretty cheap, but if you get one of the other meals you're blowing the majority of a 10 dollar bill. I wen't to Sonic last week and got a bacon cheese burger meal and a side of cheese sticks and it was $12. I can make a lot of food at home for $12.
2014-02-11 01:01:45 AM  
1 vote:

ramblinwreck: Notabunny: Here's a fun idea: Let's change the way the government subsidizes food so that a Big Mac costs $8 and 2,000 calories worth of salad costs $1.99

Or not... because MORE government is not the solution (especially when using tax dollars then usually do the opposite of what's intended)

Here's an example: let's drug test every welfare recipient!  Oh wait, never mind...that costs us more money in managing a drug testing program that the benefit we get from denying welfare...OOOPS.

Oh, wait..that's only applies when conservatives fail at government.


Never have I seen a more appropriate Fark handle.  You do understand that we're already spending money to make the corn, beef and wheat that went into the Big Mac cheaper?  He's suggesting shifting the existing subsidies to different, healthier foods.
2014-02-11 01:00:24 AM  
1 vote:

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Notabunny: ReapTheChaos: I've been seeing these "lets end food deserts" ads on TV quite a bit and I've been wondering where exactly are the grocery store that don't sell vegetables? I've been to stores in some pretty poor neighborhoods and I've never seen one that didn't. Even if their selection of fresh produce was limited, they always have frozen, which for most vegetables is just as healthy as fresh.

The problem isn't access to healthy food, it's getting people to change their habits. If you didn't grow up eating vegetables and healthy food then your not likely to do it as an adult.

I know anecdotal evidence is flimsy, but I work in downtown Stockton, CA. and I'm willing to make a bet. Let's stand on the steps of City Hall, and I'll give you an hour to walk to a store and buy lettuce, carrots, potatoes, bananas, apples, a gallon of milk, and then walk back. I know that within 20 minutes you can get a payday loan and buy a fifth of Jack, but that's a different bet.

They don't have a Caltrans in Stockton?


One of the (many) interesting things about Stockton is that we are surrounded by some of the most fertile and productive farmland in the world. It's a lush and verdant wonderland of food and abundance. But many of Stockton's residents don't have access to fresh produce. They may walk past 5 liquor stores and 2 burger joints on the way to the check cashing place, but no store between Point A and Point B will offer the produce grown in a ring around the city.
2014-02-11 12:57:12 AM  
1 vote:

doglover: fusillade762: But more than that, he says, many people, particularly in low-income food deserts, just aren't used to buying or preparing healthy meals

I think only in America will you find poor people who don't know how to cook.

It's not a matter of know, it's a matter of when you work three jobs, you don't have time to shop or cook.

Also fast food places sell TINY salads for WAY TOO MUCH. If you really want people to be healthy, offer big, cheap salads with a lot of lettuce. A free apple with every value meal for 10 cents more. Y'know, shiat like that.


Well, lettuce (at least the iceberg lettuce commonly found in salads) doesn't have a lot of nutritional value.  A big cheap salad with spinach of assorted greens as the base, with a lot of tomatoes, onions, peppers, mushrooms, carrots, broccoli, etc on top is another story, but that's also more expensive.
2014-02-11 12:56:28 AM  
1 vote:
FTA: To check that notion, he and colleagues from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine recently residents of one low-income community in Philadelphia before and after the opening of a glistening new supermarket brimming with fresh produce.


I think I found the problem:

SilentStrider: "Fast food is cheaper and easier to consume than healthy food." - Ric Romero

2014-02-11 12:43:22 AM  
1 vote:

ReapTheChaos: I've been seeing these "lets end food deserts" ads on TV quite a bit and I've been wondering where exactly are the grocery store that don't sell vegetables? I've been to stores in some pretty poor neighborhoods and I've never seen one that didn't. Even if their selection of fresh produce was limited, they always have frozen, which for most vegetables is just as healthy as fresh.

The problem isn't access to healthy food, it's getting people to change their habits. If you didn't grow up eating vegetables and healthy food then your not likely to do it as an adult.


I know anecdotal evidence is flimsy, but I work in downtown Stockton, CA. and I'm willing to make a bet. Let's stand on the steps of City Hall, and I'll give you an hour to walk to a store and buy lettuce, carrots, potatoes, bananas, apples, a gallon of milk, and then walk back. I know that within 20 minutes you can get a payday loan and buy a fifth of Jack, but that's a different bet.
2014-02-11 12:37:47 AM  
1 vote:

Notabunny: Here's a fun idea: Let's change the way the government subsidizes food so that a Big Mac costs $8 and 2,000 calories worth of salad costs $1.99


Quoted and posted.
2014-02-11 12:37:26 AM  
1 vote:

Notabunny: Here's a fun idea: Let's change the way the government subsidizes food so that a Big Mac costs $8 and 2,000 calories worth of salad costs $1.99


Or not... because MORE government is not the solution (especially when using tax dollars then usually do the opposite of what's intended)

Here's an example: let's drug test every welfare recipient!  Oh wait, never mind...that costs us more money in managing a drug testing program that the benefit we get from denying welfare...OOOPS.

Oh, wait..that's only applies when conservatives fail at government.
2014-02-11 12:33:09 AM  
1 vote:
This just in, businesses don't survive in environments where people don't buy their goods.  Ric Romero on at 11.
2014-02-11 12:23:57 AM  
1 vote:

fusillade762: But more than that, he says, many people, particularly in low-income food deserts, just aren't used to buying or preparing healthy meals

I think only in America will you find poor people who don't know how to cook.


Its a testament to how well off America really is.
2014-02-11 12:19:54 AM  
1 vote:
So, the "food desert" is the progressives' version of the knockout game, right?
2014-02-11 12:17:50 AM  
1 vote:

fusillade762: But more than that, he says, many people, particularly in low-income food deserts, just aren't used to buying or preparing healthy meals

I think only in America will you find poor people who don't know how to cook.


Nah, Britain and Canada too.
 
Displayed 63 of 63 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter






In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report