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(io9)   Good news, everyone. You can't get pregnant via gun bullet - no matter how you pack the load   (io9.com) divider line 37
    More: Obvious, military medicine, medical journals  
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3428 clicks; posted to Geek » on 09 Feb 2014 at 3:27 PM (45 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



37 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-02-09 02:04:39 PM  
Can't be too careful.

ecx.images-amazon.com
 
2014-02-09 03:32:54 PM  
Yeah, Mythbusters covered this long ago.
 
2014-02-09 03:38:12 PM  

Cpl.D: Yeah, Mythbusters covered this long ago.


Kari got pregnant: Myth confirmed.

/Don't remember such an episode.
 
2014-02-09 03:47:03 PM  
Gun bullet?
 
2014-02-09 03:58:33 PM  
fc02.deviantart.net
 
2014-02-09 04:12:31 PM  

Cpl.D: Yeah, Mythbusters covered this long ago.


I'd like to see how they pulled THAT one off... It's not like they've paid attention when there was documented evidence supporting or busting a myth before, so I suppose that in the interest of good scientific method, they shot some dude in the nuts, and made sure that it lodged in a woman afterwards. I'm also sure that they did it with multiple subjects, considering that getting pregnant is actually rather long odds with some, and easy for others...

Aw, shiat, who am I kidding? They blew something up and jumped to conoclusions, as usual.
 
2014-02-09 04:33:38 PM  
Speak for yourself subby, but I'm not shooting blanks.
 
2014-02-09 04:54:23 PM  
I heard this story in sex ed.

Actually, my teachers related quite a few urban legends and common misconceptions.
 
2014-02-09 05:08:41 PM  
Actually I have read a case study in a legitimate medical journal of pregnancy by bullet.  It concerned a 15-year-old African girl with a congenital birth defect that meant her vagina had no natural opening.  Despite this she carried and delivered a healthy baby by c-section after being shot in the abdomen shortly after performing oral sex on her boyfriend, as the wound allowed some of his sperm to migrate from her digestive tract to her reproductive tract.

I saved the article on my other computer.  I can find a reference later.
 
2014-02-09 05:24:28 PM  

postnobills: Actually I have read a case study in a legitimate medical journal of pregnancy by bullet.  It concerned a 15-year-old African girl with a congenital birth defect that meant her vagina had no natural opening.  Despite this she carried and delivered a healthy baby by c-section after being shot in the abdomen shortly after performing oral sex on her boyfriend, as the wound allowed some of his sperm to migrate from her digestive tract to her reproductive tract.

I saved the article on my other computer.  I can find a reference later.


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3191066

???
 
2014-02-09 05:25:51 PM  
 
2014-02-09 05:26:07 PM  

postnobills: Actually I have read a case study in a legitimate medical journal of pregnancy by bullet.  It concerned a 15-year-old African girl with a congenital birth defect that meant her vagina had no natural opening.  Despite this she carried and delivered a healthy baby by c-section after being shot in the abdomen shortly after performing oral sex on her boyfriend, as the wound allowed some of his sperm to migrate from her digestive tract to her reproductive tract.

I saved the article on my other computer.  I can find a reference later.


She was Australian and was wounded in a knife fight at the bar she worked at.  I saw the sto
 
2014-02-09 05:26:54 PM  
ry here on Fark.


WTF happened to that post?
 
2014-02-09 05:27:41 PM  
Mikey1969 * * Smartest * Funniest 2014-02-09 04:12:31 PM Cpl.D: Yeah, Mythbusters covered this long ago. I'd like to see how they pulled THAT one off... It's not like they've paid attention when there was documented evidence supporting or busting a myth before, so I suppose that in the interest of good scientific method, they shot some dude in the nuts, and made sure that it lodged in a woman afterwards. I'm also sure that they did it with multiple subjects, considering that getting pregnant is actually rather long odds with some, and easy for others...
===================================

Like this, jackass:

-
A Civil War era bullet was fired through a pouch containing spermatozoa and into ballistic gel representing the woman's abdomen; no living spermatozoa were subsequently found in the gel.
-

Which is exactly how I figured it would be done... with the same exact result I figured would happen.
 
2014-02-09 05:28:06 PM  
 
2014-02-09 05:40:53 PM  

null: http://img2.timg.co.il/CommunaFiles/21227065.pdf


Yes, that's the one.  Stabbed, not shot as it turns out.  It happened in Lesotho, not sure about Australia unless that's another case? Can 15-year-olds even work in bars in Australia?
 
2014-02-09 05:53:06 PM  
I guess you won't be a son of a gun.
 
433 [TotalFark]
2014-02-09 05:53:08 PM  
mimg.ugo.com

knows a thing or two about gun bullets.
 
2014-02-09 06:08:56 PM  
Slings aren't really so common anymore that you need to specify what sort of bullet you are talking about.
 
2014-02-09 06:12:36 PM  
I'm a loyal Futurama fan but this Farnsworth thing is putting on the water skis.

/Fingerbang!
 
2014-02-09 07:00:58 PM  

jake3988: Mikey1969 * * Smartest * Funniest 2014-02-09 04:12:31 PM Cpl.D: Yeah, Mythbusters covered this long ago. I'd like to see how they pulled THAT one off... It's not like they've paid attention when there was documented evidence supporting or busting a myth before, so I suppose that in the interest of good scientific method, they shot some dude in the nuts, and made sure that it lodged in a woman afterwards. I'm also sure that they did it with multiple subjects, considering that getting pregnant is actually rather long odds with some, and easy for others...
===================================

Like this, jackass:

-
A Civil War era bullet was fired through a pouch containing spermatozoa and into ballistic gel representing the woman's abdomen; no living spermatozoa were subsequently found in the gel.
-

Which is exactly how I figured it would be done... with the same exact result I figured would happen.


Which pretty well sums up why MythBusters is considered a joke in scientific circles. The inability to replicate the "myth " being investigated does not render it "busted".
 
2014-02-09 07:28:38 PM  

Gough: Which pretty well sums up why MythBusters is considered a joke in scientific circles. The inability to replicate the "myth " being investigated does not render it "busted".


Funny, most scientists I know like the show.  They realize it's an entertainment show about science, and they know that if they adhered 100% to pure scientific rigor, your average viewer would fall asleep.  It's intended as an introduction to the process of science, and it operates as one.  And it's done what few shows have... made science fun.  And let's be honest... nowadays it takes a cement truck being blown to pieces for many kids to pay attention to something.
 
2014-02-09 08:17:24 PM  

Gough: jake3988: Mikey1969 * * Smartest * Funniest 2014-02-09 04:12:31 PM Cpl.D: Yeah, Mythbusters covered this long ago. I'd like to see how they pulled THAT one off... It's not like they've paid attention when there was documented evidence supporting or busting a myth before, so I suppose that in the interest of good scientific method, they shot some dude in the nuts, and made sure that it lodged in a woman afterwards. I'm also sure that they did it with multiple subjects, considering that getting pregnant is actually rather long odds with some, and easy for others...
===================================

Like this, jackass:

-
A Civil War era bullet was fired through a pouch containing spermatozoa and into ballistic gel representing the woman's abdomen; no living spermatozoa were subsequently found in the gel.
-

Which is exactly how I figured it would be done... with the same exact result I figured would happen.

Which pretty well sums up why MythBusters is considered a joke in scientific circles. The inability to replicate the "myth " being investigated does not render it "busted".


Ah, let's be a snooty whiner. 

MB's never purport to be anything more than entertainment. Sometimes they go the extra mile for sample size, and sometimes they don't. They did this particular test more than a few times and honestly, there is no way that a living sperm could be hit by a bullet in some dude's testes and fly across 1-300m of space (still alive mind you), penetrate fabric, skin, flesh and blood to immaculately impregnate a woman.
 
2014-02-09 08:43:47 PM  

Gough: jake3988: Mikey1969 * * Smartest * Funniest 2014-02-09 04:12:31 PM Cpl.D: Yeah, Mythbusters covered this long ago. I'd like to see how they pulled THAT one off... It's not like they've paid attention when there was documented evidence supporting or busting a myth before, so I suppose that in the interest of good scientific method, they shot some dude in the nuts, and made sure that it lodged in a woman afterwards. I'm also sure that they did it with multiple subjects, considering that getting pregnant is actually rather long odds with some, and easy for others...
===================================

Like this, jackass:

-
A Civil War era bullet was fired through a pouch containing spermatozoa and into ballistic gel representing the woman's abdomen; no living spermatozoa were subsequently found in the gel.
-

Which is exactly how I figured it would be done... with the same exact result I figured would happen.

Which pretty well sums up why MythBusters is considered a joke in scientific circles. The inability to replicate the "myth " being investigated does not render it "busted".


I wasn't aware Mythbusters was ever intended to be a 'serious' scientific show.

I'd go so far as to say any scientist who turns up his nose at the show is a condescending shiatbag who takes himself far too seriously. You've effectively said 'Sesame street isn't a reputable scientific journal'.

Which is great, and technically valid, but you'd have to be a raging farkwit to think it was pretending to be in the first place.
 
2014-02-09 09:49:01 PM  

Cpl.D: Gough: Which pretty well sums up why MythBusters is considered a joke in scientific circles. The inability to replicate the "myth " being investigated does not render it "busted".

Funny, most scientists I know like the show.  They realize it's an entertainment show about science, and they know that if they adhered 100% to pure scientific rigor, your average viewer would fall asleep.  It's intended as an introduction to the process of science, and it operates as one.  And it's done what few shows have... made science fun.  And let's be honest... nowadays it takes a cement truck being blown to pieces for many kids to pay attention to something.


imgs.xkcd.com
/xkcd
//everything
///etc
 
2014-02-09 10:13:22 PM  
lenasvalforshedin.se
Approves
 
2014-02-09 10:27:52 PM  
I sprayed my grapeshot all over her face
 
2014-02-09 10:38:02 PM  

phimuskapsi: Gough: jake3988: Mikey1969 * * Smartest * Funniest 2014-02-09 04:12:31 PM Cpl.D: Yeah, Mythbusters covered this long ago. I'd like to see how they pulled THAT one off... It's not like they've paid attention when there was documented evidence supporting or busting a myth before, so I suppose that in the interest of good scientific method, they shot some dude in the nuts, and made sure that it lodged in a woman afterwards. I'm also sure that they did it with multiple subjects, considering that getting pregnant is actually rather long odds with some, and easy for others...
===================================

Like this, jackass:

-
A Civil War era bullet was fired through a pouch containing spermatozoa and into ballistic gel representing the woman's abdomen; no living spermatozoa were subsequently found in the gel.
-

Which is exactly how I figured it would be done... with the same exact result I figured would happen.

Which pretty well sums up why MythBusters is considered a joke in scientific circles. The inability to replicate the "myth " being investigated does not render it "busted".

Ah, let's be a snooty whiner. 

MB's never purport to be anything more than entertainment. Sometimes they go the extra mile for sample size, and sometimes they don't. They did this particular test more than a few times and honestly, there is no way that a living sperm could be hit by a bullet in some dude's testes and fly across 1-300m of space (still alive mind you), penetrate fabric, skin, flesh and blood to immaculately impregnate a woman.


I bet it's possible. My guess is that it can happen but the odds are so low that ovulating woman would have to be shot in the uterus with bullets that took a detour through scrotums rather frequently for it to ever happen.
 
2014-02-10 12:26:40 AM  

picturescrazy: phimuskapsi: Gough: jake3988: Mikey1969 * * Smartest * Funniest 2014-02-09 04:12:31 PM Cpl.D: Yeah, Mythbusters covered this long ago. I'd like to see how they pulled THAT one off... It's not like they've paid attention when there was documented evidence supporting or busting a myth before, so I suppose that in the interest of good scientific method, they shot some dude in the nuts, and made sure that it lodged in a woman afterwards. I'm also sure that they did it with multiple subjects, considering that getting pregnant is actually rather long odds with some, and easy for others...
===================================

Like this, jackass:

-
A Civil War era bullet was fired through a pouch containing spermatozoa and into ballistic gel representing the woman's abdomen; no living spermatozoa were subsequently found in the gel.
-

Which is exactly how I figured it would be done... with the same exact result I figured would happen.

Which pretty well sums up why MythBusters is considered a joke in scientific circles. The inability to replicate the "myth " being investigated does not render it "busted".

Ah, let's be a snooty whiner. 

MB's never purport to be anything more than entertainment. Sometimes they go the extra mile for sample size, and sometimes they don't. They did this particular test more than a few times and honestly, there is no way that a living sperm could be hit by a bullet in some dude's testes and fly across 1-300m of space (still alive mind you), penetrate fabric, skin, flesh and blood to immaculately impregnate a woman.

I bet it's possible. My guess is that it can happen but the odds are so low that ovulating woman would have to be shot in the uterus with bullets that took a detour through scrotums rather frequently for it to ever happen.


No. It's not. Even olde bullets weren't porous, so there was little to stick to. On top of that the bullet on the impact would be going hundreds of feet per second and would force any 'liquids' to go forward and out from the impact. Even if one or two managed to hang on beyond that (and the wind) and then hang on through the penetration of a second target...no it's just not possible.
 
2014-02-10 01:59:19 AM  

Gough: Which pretty well sums up why MythBusters is considered a joke in scientific circles.


Just like "Star Wars" is considered a joke in scientific circles? Or the X-files?

/oh, and you're wrong

Gough: Which pretty well sums up why MythBusters is considered a joke in scientific circles.


Just like they consider "Star Wars" and other TV shows 'jokes'? Ha! You seem to be under the misapprehension that they are confused about the show; you sure seem to be.

Also: Mr. Hyneman, however, insists that he and the "Mythbusters" team "don't have any pretense of teaching science." His wife, he noted, is a science teacher, and he knows how difficult that profession is. "If we tried to teach science," he said, "the shows probably wouldn't be successful." "If people take away science from it," Mr. Hyneman said, "it's not our fault." But if the antics inspire people to dig deeper into learning, he said, "that's great."
---
Science teachers know a good thing when they see one, however: Mr. Hyneman and Mr. Savage were invited to speak at the annual convention of the National Science Teachers Association in March, and the California Science Teachers Association named Mr. Savage and Mr. Hyneman honorary lifetime members in October.
---
David Wallace, an associate professor of mechanical engineering at M.I.T., praises the program for "getting people interested in engineering, technology and how things work."


They (and others) seem to know exactly what the show is, and what it means. It's really only the ... hurm ... morosophs -- those for whom the phrase "A little learning is a dangerous thing" was penned -- that seem to have the problem with the show's scientific rigor.
Those and the curmudgeons who just like to biatch about everything.
 
2014-02-10 02:51:57 AM  

ArcadianRefugee: Gough: Which pretty well sums up why MythBusters is considered a joke in scientific circles.

Just like "Star Wars" is considered a joke in scientific circles? Or the X-files?

/oh, and you're wrongGough: Which pretty well sums up why MythBusters is considered a joke in scientific circles.

Just like they consider "Star Wars" and other TV shows 'jokes'? Ha! You seem to be under the misapprehension that they are confused about the show; you sure seem to be.

Also: Mr. Hyneman, however, insists that he and the "Mythbusters" team "don't have any pretense of teaching science." His wife, he noted, is a science teacher, and he knows how difficult that profession is. "If we tried to teach science," he said, "the shows probably wouldn't be successful." "If people take away science from it," Mr. Hyneman said, "it's not our fault." But if the antics inspire people to dig deeper into learning, he said, "that's great."
---
Science teachers know a good thing when they see one, however: Mr. Hyneman and Mr. Savage were invited to speak at the annual convention of the National Science Teachers Association in March, and the California Science Teachers Association named Mr. Savage and Mr. Hyneman honorary lifetime members in October.
---
David Wallace, an associate professor of mechanical engineering at M.I.T., praises the program for "getting people interested in engineering, technology and how things work."

They (and others) seem to know exactly what the show is, and what it means. It's really only the ... hurm ... morosophs -- those for whom the phrase "A little learning is a dangerous thing" was penned -- that seem to have the problem with the show's scientific rigor.
Those and the curmudgeons who just like to biatch about everything.


You just summed up Fark in one brief sentence.
 
2014-02-10 05:05:01 AM  

AbiNormal: ArcadianRefugee: Gough: Which pretty well sums up why MythBusters is considered a joke in scientific circles.

Just like "Star Wars" is considered a joke in scientific circles? Or the X-files?

/oh, and you're wrongGough: Which pretty well sums up why MythBusters is considered a joke in scientific circles.

Just like they consider "Star Wars" and other TV shows 'jokes'? Ha! You seem to be under the misapprehension that they are confused about the show; you sure seem to be.

Also: Mr. Hyneman, however, insists that he and the "Mythbusters" team "don't have any pretense of teaching science." His wife, he noted, is a science teacher, and he knows how difficult that profession is. "If we tried to teach science," he said, "the shows probably wouldn't be successful." "If people take away science from it," Mr. Hyneman said, "it's not our fault." But if the antics inspire people to dig deeper into learning, he said, "that's great."
---
Science teachers know a good thing when they see one, however: Mr. Hyneman and Mr. Savage were invited to speak at the annual convention of the National Science Teachers Association in March, and the California Science Teachers Association named Mr. Savage and Mr. Hyneman honorary lifetime members in October.
---
David Wallace, an associate professor of mechanical engineering at M.I.T., praises the program for "getting people interested in engineering, technology and how things work."

They (and others) seem to know exactly what the show is, and what it means. It's really only the ... hurm ... morosophs -- those for whom the phrase "A little learning is a dangerous thing" was penned -- that seem to have the problem with the show's scientific rigor.
Those and the curmudgeons who just like to biatch about everything.

You just summed up Fark in one brief sentence.


"At least we're not reddit" could have worked just as well.
 
2014-02-10 05:52:35 AM  

robertus: Approves


Came for this (HUR HUR HUR), leaving happy.
 
2014-02-10 07:46:59 AM  

New Farkin User Name: Cpl.D: Gough: Which pretty well sums up why MythBusters is considered a joke in scientific circles. The inability to replicate the "myth " being investigated does not render it "busted".

Funny, most scientists I know like the show.  They realize it's an entertainment show about science, and they know that if they adhered 100% to pure scientific rigor, your average viewer would fall asleep.  It's intended as an introduction to the process of science, and it operates as one.  And it's done what few shows have... made science fun.  And let's be honest... nowadays it takes a cement truck being blown to pieces for many kids to pay attention to something.


/xkcd
//everything
///etc


The issue I have with mythbusters is that too often it's all experiment with no theory. They will test a myth that can be shown not to work on paper.
 
2014-02-10 07:49:40 AM  

ArcadianRefugee: Gough: Which pretty well sums up why MythBusters is considered a joke in scientific circles.

Just like "Star Wars" is considered a joke in scientific circles? Or the X-files?

/oh, and you're wrongGough: Which pretty well sums up why MythBusters is considered a joke in scientific circles.

Just like they consider "Star Wars" and other TV shows 'jokes'? Ha! You seem to be under the misapprehension that they are confused about the show; you sure seem to be.

Also: Mr. Hyneman, however, insists that he and the "Mythbusters" team "don't have any pretense of teaching science." His wife, he noted, is a science teacher, and he knows how difficult that profession is. "If we tried to teach science," he said, "the shows probably wouldn't be successful." "If people take away science from it," Mr. Hyneman said, "it's not our fault." But if the antics inspire people to dig deeper into learning, he said, "that's great."
---
Science teachers know a good thing when they see one, however: Mr. Hyneman and Mr. Savage were invited to speak at the annual convention of the National Science Teachers Association in March, and the California Science Teachers Association named Mr. Savage and Mr. Hyneman honorary lifetime members in October.
---
David Wallace, an associate professor of mechanical engineering at M.I.T., praises the program for "getting people interested in engineering, technology and how things work."

They (and others) seem to know exactly what the show is, and what it means. It's really only the ... hurm ... morosophs -- those for whom the phrase "A little learning is a dangerous thing" was penned -- that seem to have the problem with the show's scientific rigor.
Those and the curmudgeons who just like to biatch about everything.


I agree the shows great and I like to watch it, I just wish theyd present more science sometimes, maybe after they test a theory.
 
2014-02-10 10:43:32 AM  

Animatronik: They will test a myth that can be shown not to work on paper.


So? The "work on paper" bookkeeping only compels the balance of surprise at the results of a test. That's part of zombie Feynman's point. If the test works despite what the paper says to expect, that's when scientists get interested.
 
2014-02-10 01:39:32 PM  
What if you use sapphire bullets of PURE LOVE?
 
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