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(TreeHugger)   "I now shop for food with a collection of 1-liter glass canning jars in a big basket. When I approach the deli, meat, or fish counters, I hold out my glass jar and politely ask the employee to put it in the jar"   (treehugger.com) divider line 81
    More: Strange, Mason jar, fish counter, glass canning, jars, basket, C.S.A.: The Confederate States of America, grocery stores, collections  
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11504 clicks; posted to Main » on 09 Feb 2014 at 8:22 AM (24 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



81 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-02-09 11:17:58 AM
Koan: What is the sound of 1 Liter jarring?
 
2014-02-09 11:18:32 AM

macross87: Put the lotion in the jar...


and the deli meat in the lotion bottle.

/we're just brainstorming here right?
// nevermind. I already did it
 
2014-02-09 11:20:18 AM

indarwinsshadow: I know this is slightly off topic, but my great grandfather was a farmer in Matchedash township, near Coldwater, Ontario. I remember my grandmother telling me they never ever wasted any type of foods. What they didn't eat, or went over or was left over all went to the pigs. The pigs were the compost pile in those days.


My point, is we should just buy some pigs...or something. F*ck, I forget the point.


You can do this with kids too. Whatever kids you aren't using, give them to the pigs.
 
2014-02-09 11:26:44 AM
"I hold out my glass jar and politely ask the employee to put it in the jar"

One of these days somebody is going to do exactly that.
 
2014-02-09 11:32:03 AM

Ker_Thwap: Deli: It's pain in the butt for an employee to tare the container/scale fore each different jar, then return the scale back to the standard tare.


Really? Put the jar and paper on the scale, press "Tare", weigh food, remove jar and paper, press "Tare". How is that hard?

Ker_Thwap: This thought occurred to me when I saw her $75,000 designer kitchen in the background. Because nothing says earthy crunchy like surrounding yourself with thousands of pounds of manufactured goods when you re-use your glass jars.


It was probably installed by a contractor that was going to do something similar for someone else, anyways. There's no point in feeling guilty about someone else's inevitable actions.
 
2014-02-09 11:32:28 AM
"Back in January, I wrote a post about the Johnson family, who have reduced household trash to one quart a year."


So, what are they doing with all their junk mail?  Burning it and releasing toxic chemicals into the air?  Most of my garbage consists of all the junk mail the USPS insists on giving me.
 
2014-02-09 11:42:06 AM

nytmare: Savage Belief: I hate hipsters...

Cool story, bro.


But true none the less...
 
2014-02-09 11:44:27 AM
Glass jars for meat? Amateur! I find that I waste less by just coaxing my meat animals into the house where I strap them down and keep them alive while I slowly eat them over the course of a week.
 
2014-02-09 11:51:16 AM
I now shop for food with a collection of 1-liter glass canning jars in a big basket.

I use Quart jars. I refuse to knuckle under to the metric nazis. Besides, if you're spelling it "liter" instead of "litre", you're considered a piker by the New World Order.
 
2014-02-09 11:54:55 AM
Wouldn't large zippered bags be more practical? Can't see them getting a chicken in a quart jar.
 
2014-02-09 12:00:20 PM

oukewldave: "Back in January, I wrote a post about the Johnson family, who have reduced household trash to one quart a year."


So, what are they doing with all their junk mail?  Burning it and releasing toxic chemicals into the air?  Most of my garbage consists of all the junk mail the USPS insists on giving me.


Well, there's this new technique they call "recycling."
 
2014-02-09 12:04:38 PM
I like styrofoam. Sorry folks, but I do.
 
2014-02-09 12:12:58 PM
Made me think of this:
img.fark.net
Grand Inquisitor (whispering) : Put in the car
 
2014-02-09 12:46:09 PM
HA! What an amateur! When I go shopping, I walk to the store and ask the people behind the deli counter to just put the meat or cheese in my hands, and then I pay for it, walk home, and put it in a stone vat. Then I walk back and get another item. I don't use any gasoline! I don't use ANY extra containers! It all goes in that one vat!!!

/derp
 
2014-02-09 01:09:51 PM
I watched the video about the "zero-waste" family that inspired the author of this article, and I'd say they are outsourcing their trash in many ways.  I'm particularly curious about their large remodeled home.  I do most of my house and car repairs, and those jobs create trash from packaging to the disposal of old parts and materials.  I'd bet they pay for their car and home repairs, and so the workers make that waste magically disappear.   I also wonder how they deal with people who want to give them gifts.
 
2014-02-09 01:10:55 PM
brantgoose:
When you realize how economical people used to be, the wastefulness of our hygienic and disposable world is really glaring. You can't even get repairs to expensive electrical equipment nowadays without paying more than a new item would cost

Mass production isn't wasteful, its very efficient. That's for example reflected in its price.

But hey, if this unemployed lady gets off by doing this, more power to her.
 
2014-02-09 01:35:24 PM
i141.photobucket.com
 
2014-02-09 01:44:16 PM
I do a lot of electronic repairs through the mail and end up reusing boxes and packaging materials at least once. While I hate the idea of packing peanuts holy crap are they light and useful. I'd never go out of my way to buy them or bubble wrap but if I'm shipped either I'll gladly reuse it.

Mainly for economic reasons but there is an environmental bent to it as well that was never an overt priority. I can't imagine trying to get waste down to absolutely zero and find it an impractical idea.
 
2014-02-09 01:47:16 PM
It's not stupid: I remember when the Germans did this.
Customers would buy packaged stuff, transfer it into their own containers, and the store would have to take the waste back and pay for its disposal.
Packages quickly became much simpler.
 
2014-02-09 01:50:59 PM
Hey, I'm on her side...

She puts her meat in a jar,...

I put my...

meat in a box!

0-media-cdn.foolz.us
 
2014-02-09 01:52:26 PM

Tobin_Lam: Ker_Thwap: Deli: It's pain in the butt for an employee to tare the container/scale fore each different jar, then return the scale back to the standard tare.

Really? Put the jar and paper on the scale, press "Tare", weigh food, remove jar and paper, press "Tare". How is that hard?

Ker_Thwap: This thought occurred to me when I saw her $75,000 designer kitchen in the background. Because nothing says earthy crunchy like surrounding yourself with thousands of pounds of manufactured goods when you re-use your glass jars.

It was probably installed by a contractor that was going to do something similar for someone else, anyways. There's no point in feeling guilty about someone else's inevitable actions.


Eh, it's been 30 years since I last used a deli scale, but I recall a three or more second wait for each tare reset.  Maybe that's changed in recent times.  I used to hustle in a high volume store.  I'd also be really hesitant to put someone's skanky jar on my scale without grabbing a paper towel and chemical cleaner, and washing the bottom of it at least.  Then I'd want to wash my hands and/or put on a different plastic glove before touching any food again.  Food borne illness is not a joke.

I can only assume that you're joking about the palatial kitchen and the inevitability of the contractor's actions.  I'd love a kitchen like that myself, but I'm at least self aware enough to realize that it was ME that was wasting resources, and not blame it one someone else.  My whole house is probably the size of her kitchen.

I never feel guilt, I'm just aware of what I do.  I don't ask others to change their lifestyles, I just ask them not to make ignorant choices.  I like to weigh the pros and cons of any choice.
 
2014-02-09 02:07:31 PM

brantgoose: Plastic containers would be lighter and easier to carry, or metal if you want something more durable that doesn't stain. The dollar stores are full of cheap steel from China.

This used to be done all the time before the modern supermarket came in during the 1930s and 40s. In the deli section it must work just fine because much of the the food, such as sausages and sandwich meat is weighed before it is packaged. They can dish some of the wetter foods out on waxed paper and put the paper wrapped food into your container without weighing your container, but many cash registers and scales can handle the math nowadays. People used to send glass bottles back to the doctor or pharmacy or to stores to be refilled with soda or what not.

It wasn't long ago in historical terms that floor clerks send cash to cashiers in iron-barred boxes to make change. A pneumatic system propelled the tubes with the chit and cash in it. This was because many clerks did not have the math skills or honesty to handle cash. Today the electric cash register (a Canadian invention) makes modern commerce faster and more reliable because cashiers barely have to be able to count. Before the supermarket, you asked clerks to collect your purchases from the shelves, and many things were only displayed behind the counter where you couldn't get at them until you bought them.

I've learned a lot of this sort of information from contemporary cartoons. It's hard to imagine a world were everything was done for you and all goods were behind the counter or laid out in barrels.

When you realize how economical people used to be, the wastefulness of our hygienic and disposable world is really glaring. You can't even get repairs to expensive electrical equipment nowadays without paying more than a new item would cost


You sound old.

And awesome.
 
2014-02-09 02:32:58 PM

brimed03: jbrooks544: TFA blithely States that even a small amount of recycling or waste is "unsustainable"..

Um, no it isn't.
Maybe these wackos have some special definition for the word sustainable, bit we could keep doing what we are doing now for a very long time. The world is a big place. It is a complete myth that we are running out of landfill.

You are the reason people like her exist.

Extreme stupidity breeds extremely stupid reactionaries.


I'm just trying to point out the fallacy of the entire non sustainable argument. The child hard fact is, that we can go many thousands of years with our current landfill system. The fact is, we ARE NOT running out of landfill space. Just because you might think we are doesn't make it true
 
2014-02-09 03:08:25 PM
If you want to be all ecologically sensitive and 'natural', go live in the back woods of Alaska.

Folks there live off the land, recycle what they can, hand make a lot of their stuff, build their own homes and out buildings from trees they cut down and sliced up with a portable mill.

Up in the Appalachian Mountains, a lot of 'Hillbillies' do almost the same. They recycle and reuse, especially metal. Some have basically junk piles of old metal stuff which they build things from. Many still hunt for their own food.

Now, in that type of living, it's constantly labor intensive. You work all of the time. You're constantly repairing stuff. If you burn wood, then you need a lot of land and every summer you need to fell trees, hack them up, drag them home, split and stack them into an enormous amount of wood for winter.

Recycling centers these days have created a money making industry. Once folks discovered they could make major bucks from garbage, they threw themselves into it with a vengeance. Toss in 10% recycled fiber in toilet paper and you can increase the cost by 20% -- even though TP has been traditionally made from mostly recycled paper for ages.

A lot of free stuff you used to be able to get, such as wood from abandoned homes being torn down, along with things like doors and fixtures, are now costly. People haggle for the right to strip a house before the wreckers arrive and pay quite a bit of money to do so, then they resell their 'antiques'. They buy wooden roof beams, the planks used for the inner walls, fireplace mantles, ornate door frames, door knobs and even whole sets of kitchen cabinets.

Stuff you used to get for free if you asked the owner or demolition contractor.

Recycling plants have grown huge. One I visited mainly used day labor and quite a bit of it, which was good for the homeless, and melted down aluminum cans and things. They had thousand pound ingots of aluminum stacked for shipment all over the place.

Special machines were invented to strip insulation off wires to salvage the copper. Copper is now big money alone. Plastics by the ton are turned into reusable pellets and sold to manufactures at a lower cost than new. Paper is recycled. Someone even invented a way to make durable industrial pallets out of paper, to replace those made out of increasingly costly wood.

I'm past my 40's. I no longer want to work all day long. You can use a hammer to build a table where I prefer a nail gun. I like time alone to read, without worrying about a list of chores I still have to do. In Florida, I love a/c. As a kid, a/c in homes was rare and costly, so I grew up when we left the windows open, with fans all over the place and at 10 or 20 yrs old, you get used to the heat and humidity.

By 50, it becomes a drag.

I recycle. I have the paper, plastic and metal bins. I reuse the plastic shopping bags as liners for my small trash cans. (I mean, why buy liners from the store when you get them for free?)

I draw the line at a composting toilet. Compost piles can be a pain in the butt and annoy the neighbors with their smell. Gardens are nice, but in Florida, with its' subtropical climate, you constantly fight the weeds, the bugs, the birds and small animals.

So, I consider my efforts at recycling to be sufficient, especially since no one seems to be able to control the often wasteful packaging major companies use for their goods, despite repeated demands to knock it off. Plus, when I buy beef roasts, to cut up into steaks, I know that on the bottom will be a thick fat pad, left there to increase the weight to make more profit for the store.

I'm also aware that the need for recycling has come about due to the massive population growth and the sharp rise in consumers gobbling up every square foot of land available and developing it.

Maybe folks should start controlling their having kids or cities start placing population limits.

Less folks means less mess to recycle and clean up and less resources needing to be harvested. Less pollution also, especially with today's technology.
 
2014-02-09 04:37:28 PM
snot globules, That is all
 
2014-02-09 06:35:58 PM
They make glass storage containers now. Jars seem silly for some things.
 
2014-02-09 07:15:13 PM
"...using cloth diapers..."

DING!

This woman can recycle her entire farking life, and all it takes is ONE of her farking brats to grow up to be a right-wing-born-again-SUV-drivin'-quiverfull-breeder-dickhead for all her sanctimonious crap to be undone.

I am really glad I can pretty much fart on command these days.  I make pretty good use of it the instant anyone claims to be "concerned for the Earth... and so are our children."

fark you.  Have babies, you just farked the planet more than all the Saran Wrap you could carry in a 747.
 
2014-02-09 08:24:09 PM
brantgoose: <snip>

When you realize how economical people used to be, the wastefulness of our hygienic and disposable world is really glaring. You can't even get repairs to expensive electrical equipment nowadays without paying more than a new item would cost

Yes, but that's because manufacturing processes for that equipment has changed. Repairing old kit that is full of chunky through-hole components is very different to repairing multi-layer printed circuit boards.
 
2014-02-09 11:41:27 PM

Ker_Thwap: FarkingReading: I do this exact same thing.

Except I carry the jars in fur-lined asbestos bags and, when I'm done with them, I smash the jars on the rocks by the creek in the nearby wildlife sanctuary where I also make wind sculptures out of the plastic rings that hold six packs together and I snag birds by hanging the sculptures from trees that I periodically slash and burn using uranium-infused kerosene that I manufacture by hard-pressing vegans' souls in a device made from the bones of bald eagles, which I catch in webs made from dolphins' veins when I'm in my boat that has a hull carved from redwood and sails made from American Indians' skins.

This thought occurred to me when I saw her $75,000 designer kitchen in the background.  Because nothing says earthy crunchy like surrounding yourself with thousands of pounds of manufactured goods when you re-use your glass jars.


It's definitely a certain type of person I'm familiar. Born rich, and feels morally superior to the unenlightened poors because THEY are saving the earth, because they drive a Prius and shop for organic things and bicycle recreationally. Meanwhile they also live in an enormous house and take plane trips all over the world (to get to know various cultures naturally, these people are not so crass as to hit the common tourist places) which cumulatively consumes more energy than some poor person living in an apartment or small house with an older but reasonably fuel efficient car. Bonus points if they fetishize impoverished people in other countries because of how low impact and earth friendly their life style is while continuing to live in their giant house. They are also the most likely group of Americans besides religious whackjobs not to vaccinate their children.
 
2014-02-10 07:27:30 AM

TheTurtle: "...using cloth diapers..."

DING!

This woman can recycle her entire farking life, and all it takes is ONE of her farking brats to grow up to be a right-wing-born-again-SUV-drivin'-quiverfull-breeder-dickhead for all her sanctimonious crap to be undone.

I am really glad I can pretty much fart on command these days.  I make pretty good use of it the instant anyone claims to be "concerned for the Earth... and so are our children."

fark you.  Have babies, you just farked the planet more than all the Saran Wrap you could carry in a 747.


Not all efforts are to save the world forever.  We do what we can while we're here.  Maybe we help more people than we harm.  Same goes for any children we have.  In the end you hope the good guys outnumber the bad guys.

But in reality, Idiocracy is a documentary. Humanity is doomed.
 
2014-02-10 12:27:10 PM
feckingmorons [TotalFark]


That sort of thing is done in Mexico all the time.

And the one thing the US needs to be more like, it's mexico.
 
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