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(AZCentral)   Principal removes 'Things I Have to Tell You: Poems and Writing by Teenage Girls' from the library because it depicts the euphoric feelings of smoking crack. "It didn't point out that she might have died of a heart attack or become a sex slave"   (azcentral.com) divider line 9
    More: Interesting, Stapley, Mesa's Stapley Junior High School, heart attacks, banned books, American Library Association, poems, smoking  
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2350 clicks; posted to Main » on 08 Feb 2014 at 8:28 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-02-08 10:20:15 PM  
2 votes:
I think you'd need crack to actually sit through the average teenage girl's poetry.
2014-02-08 09:01:56 PM  
2 votes:

oh_please: What subby left out is that it was a junior high school.

I'm sure that there are plenty of folks who are comfortable with their 14-year-olds reading this, but that's a parental decision...not something that a junior HS should offer up in their library. I can't wait for the crusaders who say OMG BOOK BANNING HITLER


God forbid we educate our kids. Isn't that what school is for? I suppose you think certain subjects should only be handled by parents, or at least with parental approval. Where do you draw the line? Is it okay for schools to teach the quadratic equation without parental permission?

or the short version: fark off and die.
2014-02-09 01:29:20 AM  
1 votes:
i306.photobucket.com
2014-02-09 01:28:58 AM  
1 votes:

oh_please: Gyrfalcon: What is your point here?
My original point WAS that poetry about sex and drug use wouldn't fly in a public junior HS library, because of it's controversial content. I thought it would be obvious to everyone. I even made an over-the-top joke that I couldn't wait for people to compare this to Hitler and book burning.

Sure enough, everyone took me at my word, and lost their collective minds, ranging from bragging about all the sex books they read at a young age, to literally wishing me dead.

The thing is, I tried to be nice early on and discuss, but the FARK BrigadeTM was having none of that.

I'm torn...should I be offended at all the pitchforks and torches, or should I be laughing my ass off?


Well, then, your original point was completely wrong, because public junior high school libraries are rife with controversial content. The problem is that regardless of whatever you call "controversial" there's always someone willing and able to set the bar even lower, until Beatrix Potter books would be too controversial for some people. My rebuttal to your argument was that in my very own public school junior high, there were multiple copies of the exceptionally controversial (for the time) (forty years ago now) "Go Ask Alice", "That Was Then, This is Now", Judy Blume's books on periods and wet dreams, and the early 70's drugs-are-bad books. So you have to expect that people are going to come back on you saying WHAT?!? when you make the somewhat naive comment that a book about drugs and sex "won't fly" in a junior high school library, given that most of us grew up in junior high school libraries in a much more straitlaced age, where they quite simply DID fly.

Which is why I asked what your point was, exactly. If it is that these kinds of books "won't fly" in middle schools, well, sorry, but in fact they DO, except where pearl-clutching parents and administrators preemptively remove them. It isn't that the KIDS are horrified by the topics, because they are acutely aware of sex, drugs and consequences and need to discuss them; and it isn't most PARENTS who are horrified; it's just a few individuals who evidently believe that if kids aren't exposed to the topics, they won't think about it, and if they don't think about it, then bad things won't happen to them. If that is your position, then I assume you are against the reading of, for instance, "Romeo and Juliet," with its underage sex and street violence; "The Hunger Games" for obvious reasons; or having copies of "Call of the Wild" or "Sleepy Hollow" in the library (all that drinking and gratuitous violence).
2014-02-08 11:20:42 PM  
1 votes:

cuzsis: I see the "OMG it's a book and therefor needs to be read!" crowd is here. 

 Look, not all books are worth the paper they're printed on. Just because someone has an opinion on something and wants to be "artistic" with it, doesn't mean they have a good or well thought out opinion. School resources are limited and they *should* be picky about the books they decide to put on their shelves. They *should* be looking for books that are well written, appropriate for the age level that will be reading it, and cover the topic in a mature and educated matter.

 If this book doesn't make the cut, well, sucks to be the author. They need to write a better book.


I agree with part of what you said. Not all literary efforts are diamonds. Some are destined to remain lumps of coal. But you take books like "Go Ask Alice", "To Kill a Mockingbird", "A Wrinkle in Time", any of the "Harry Potter" books, etc... they are solid books that are worth kids taking the time to read. I realize that is just my opinion. But so is this - pay attention to what your kids are reading. If you don't want them reading something, fine. That's your perogative. But don't try to dictate what other parents should or shouldn't let their kids read just b/c you've got a burr up your ass.

/ and by 'your' I mean the complaining parents
2014-02-08 11:11:56 PM  
1 votes:
I was a voracious reader as a child. I was the kid who, when asked what I wanted for Christmas or my birthday, the answer was always "Books!" There are a LOT of things I think my folks should have done different in raising me, but the one thing that they got right was that they never stifled my desire to read. With one single exception, my mother never told me that I couldn't read this book or that book. The one exception was  Raven: The Untold Story of the Rev. Jim Jones and His People. She didn't want me reading it for some reason, and I was cool with it.

I've tried to be the same way. You want to read? Great. As long as it isn't something that encourages you to go out and hurt yourself or somebody else, read what you like and if you have any questions about what you've read, you can always come ask me.

My oldest reads the same books we do and my youngest gets so excited - like Christmas morning excited - whenever the school book fair rolls around each year. He's reading The Outsiders right now and loving it (he's in 7th grade).


Is "Are You There, God? It's Me, Margaret" still in the libraries? I remember that was controversial when I was a kid because - GASP - it talked about girls getting their periods (ew ew ew ewwwwwwwwwwwww!).
2014-02-08 10:59:41 PM  
1 votes:
I see the "OMG it's a book and therefor needs to be read!" crowd is here. 

 Look, not all books are worth the paper they're printed on. Just because someone has an opinion on something and wants to be "artistic" with it, doesn't mean they have a good or well thought out opinion. School resources are limited and they *should* be picky about the books they decide to put on their shelves. They *should* be looking for books that are well written, appropriate for the age level that will be reading it, and cover the topic in a mature and educated matter.

 If this book doesn't make the cut, well, sucks to be the author. They need to write a better book.
2014-02-08 09:11:15 PM  
1 votes:
Removing controversial poetry from a library isn't normal. But in junior high school it is.
2014-02-08 09:00:39 PM  
1 votes:

what_now: oh_please: What subby left out is that it was a junior high school.

I'm sure that there are plenty of folks who are comfortable with their 14-year-olds reading this, but that's a parental decision...not something that a junior HS should offer up in their library. I can't wait for the crusaders who say OMG BOOK BANNING HITLER

Banning books makes kids more likely to read the book. If the kid can understand the words, she should be able to read the book.

I read Steinbeck's "The Red Pony" when I was 8 and Erica Jong's " Fear of Flying" when I was 10, but I never had or played video games of any sort. We were too poor for a Nintendo System* or anything like that.

I'm ok. Neither of these books was "Appropriate" for my age.

*off my lawn.


Well, you were mature enough to handle those books. You had parents who taught you to read, and taught you to think about what you read. You're a lot luckier than the average person.

Your experience has nothing to do with what a public junior HS library has to deal with.
 
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