Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Gawker)   Decades of Greed: Behind the scenes with an angry Walmart manager   (gawker.com ) divider line
    More: Obvious, Walmart, Sam Walton, outlet store  
•       •       •

6403 clicks; posted to Business » on 06 Feb 2014 at 9:21 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



77 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all

 
2014-02-06 07:04:39 PM  
Yes. That.

/when an employer the size of Walmart cuts pay and benefits it tends to depresse pay and benefits for everyone in the labor market
//they also have a bad reputation about not promoting women
 
2014-02-06 07:08:25 PM  

Voiceofreason01: Yes. That.

/when an employer the size of Walmart cuts pay and benefits it tends to depresse pay and benefits for everyone in the labor market
//they also have a bad reputation about not promoting women


the huge salaries of the execs has to come from somewhere. now get back to work you peons
 
2014-02-06 08:55:50 PM  

i.huffpost.com


As long as I get my bonus!

 
2014-02-06 09:11:30 PM  
I walked into a Target around opening time on a normal day once, almost no customers yet. I walked down an aisle to see over a dozen employees gathered in a circle being talked to. Then they all went into some sort of dance/chant thing with a lot of clapping that made a birthday party at Chucky Cheese seem less embarrassing.

It was like a scene out of Full Metal Jacket. I realized all of the big box stores were the same.
 
2014-02-06 09:19:55 PM  

Outtaphase: I walked into a Target around opening time on a normal day once, almost no customers yet. I walked down an aisle to see over a dozen employees gathered in a circle being talked to. Then they all went into some sort of dance/chant thing with a lot of clapping that made a birthday party at Chucky Cheese seem less embarrassing.

It was like a scene out of Full Metal Jacket. I realized all of the big box stores were the same.


Yeah, exactly when did retail stores become cults?
 
2014-02-06 09:24:32 PM  

FirstNationalBastard: Outtaphase: I walked into a Target around opening time on a normal day once, almost no customers yet. I walked down an aisle to see over a dozen employees gathered in a circle being talked to. Then they all went into some sort of dance/chant thing with a lot of clapping that made a birthday party at Chucky Cheese seem less embarrassing.

It was like a scene out of Full Metal Jacket. I realized all of the big box stores were the same.

Yeah, exactly when did retail stores become cults?


it's a very popular practice in Asia...you can see people do it every day. in front of stores and restaurant...all over.

/welcome to the cult
 
2014-02-06 09:29:11 PM  

some_beer_drinker: Voiceofreason01: Yes. That.

/when an employer the size of Walmart cuts pay and benefits it tends to depresse pay and benefits for everyone in the labor market
//they also have a bad reputation about not promoting women

the huge salaries of the execs has to come from somewhere. now get back to work you peons


Get a job, slacker
 
2014-02-06 09:37:04 PM  
IT WAS the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way- in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.
 
2014-02-06 09:41:50 PM  
Seems to me that instead of a changing culture at Walmart the author became more aware of his surroundings.
 
2014-02-06 09:44:13 PM  
But $15 minimum wage will cure all!/stocked shelves will be a thing of the past
 
2014-02-06 09:50:07 PM  

Darth_Lukecash: IT WAS the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way- in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.


-Shia Lebouf

Man, I hated reading Charles Dickens in school.  That man could say absolutely nothing with an alarming amount of words.
 
2014-02-06 09:51:15 PM  

SCUBA_Archer: But $15 minimum wage will cure all!/stocked shelves will be a thing of the past


WalMart is paying less now to start than they did when this guy started. Think about that, and then go home and get your shine box, wanker.
 
2014-02-06 09:51:53 PM  
Yup, spot on. Dead-nuts on where the person talks about the stores being managed by the quarter. At the end of every financial quarter everything in the store goes right to hell because they're trying to shave costs. Rinse, repeat.

It's as though the people in charge know nothing beyond basic MBA info but have absolutely no concepts of critical thinking, human behavior, or even pattern recognition.

mrlewish: Seems to me that instead of a changing culture at Walmart the author became more aware of his surroundings.


No, there has indeed been a major shift over the years. It wasn't always like this.
 
2014-02-06 10:06:19 PM  

Voiceofreason01: Yes. That.

/when an employer the size of Walmart cuts pay and benefits it tends to depresse pay and benefits for everyone in the labor market
//they also have a bad reputation about not promoting women


I remember when I was first starting to work in high school (1998-2000) I was working at KMart making close to minimum wage ($6/hour or so) and all the kids at my school wanted to work at the new Walmart because they were offering a starting pay of $8-$8.50/hour.  The equivalent pay today would be about $11.50-$12/hour.
 
2014-02-06 10:08:42 PM  

Lsherm: Darth_Lukecash: IT WAS the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way- in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.

-Shia Lebouf

Man, I hated reading Charles Dickens in school.  That man could say absolutely nothing with an alarming amount of words.


He was paid by the word - seriously - those novels started out serialized in a newspaper.
 
2014-02-06 10:15:53 PM  
"Their over all view point is that there is little difference in performance and return on investment from a ten year associate and a new hire."

Because there isn't, that's the problem with unskilled labor. Why give someone a raise when they could hire a replacement and have them fully trained in two days.
 
2014-02-06 10:16:26 PM  

ReapTheChaos: "Their over all view point is that there is little difference in performance and return on investment from a ten year associate and a new hire."

Because there isn't, that's the problem with unskilled labor. Why give someone a raise when they could hire a replacement and have them fully trained in two days.


I don't know.  Ask Circuit City.
 
2014-02-06 10:20:19 PM  

dionysusaur: He was paid by the word - seriously - those novels started out serialized in a newspaper.


Technically, he was paid by installment, and they weren't all the same length.  I think the man just liked blathering on.  It's not like by the time he was writing the printed word was a novelty.
 
2014-02-06 10:23:19 PM  

rugman11: ReapTheChaos: "Their over all view point is that there is little difference in performance and return on investment from a ten year associate and a new hire."

Because there isn't, that's the problem with unskilled labor. Why give someone a raise when they could hire a replacement and have them fully trained in two days.

I don't know.  Ask Circuit City.


Or, on the other side, Costco. Why pay far more than Sams Club and are also far more profitable.
 
2014-02-06 10:50:56 PM  

mrlewish: Seems to me that instead of a changing culture at Walmart the author became more aware of his surroundings.


Did you miss the "retaliating against anyone who won't toe the line" parts? There were several. And par for the course at most places.

/Can't remember working anywhere that cared what I thought about anything. Ok, maybe one place.
 
2014-02-06 10:58:45 PM  
Why would anyone be an assistant manager at Walmart for 10 years without making GM?
 
2014-02-06 10:59:53 PM  

Lsherm: Darth_Lukecash: IT WAS the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way- in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.

-Shia Lebouf

Man, I hated reading Charles Dickens in school.  That man could say absolutely nothing with an alarming amount of words.


Some dickens work began as magazine serials. Just like today's graphic novels collect individual comic books as a story, so were dickens work became books.

And as a writer, he was paid by the word, to fill up space.
 
2014-02-06 11:06:01 PM  
Reading this article, it occurs to me that Wal-Mart is the North Korea of "all-in-one" shopping.
 
2014-02-06 11:08:38 PM  

some_beer_drinker: Voiceofreason01: Yes. That.

/when an employer the size of Walmart cuts pay and benefits it tends to depresse pay and benefits for everyone in the labor market
//they also have a bad reputation about not promoting women

the huge salaries of the execs has to come from somewhere. now get back to work you peons


Hillary had to get her executive salary from somewhere.
 
2014-02-06 11:10:34 PM  

Lsherm: Darth_Lukecash: IT WAS the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way- in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.

-Shia Lebouf

Man, I hated reading Charles Dickens in school.  That man could say absolutely nothing with an alarming amount of words.


Dickens was wordy (he was paid by the word for much of his work) but if you don't see the brilliance of the begging of A Tale of Two Cities, you have no soul.
 
2014-02-06 11:11:02 PM  

Needlessly Complicated: mrlewish: Seems to me that instead of a changing culture at Walmart the author became more aware of his surroundings.

Did you miss the "retaliating against anyone who won't toe the line" parts? There were several. And par for the course at most places.

/Can't remember working anywhere that cared what I thought about anything. Ok, maybe one place.


I don't see how this is contradictory to my statement.
 
2014-02-06 11:11:09 PM  

Nemo's Brother: Lsherm: Darth_Lukecash: IT WAS the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way- in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.

-Shia Lebouf

Man, I hated reading Charles Dickens in school.  That man could say absolutely nothing with an alarming amount of words.

Dickens was wordy (he was paid by the word for much of his work) but if you don't see the brilliance of the begging of A Tale of Two Cities, you have no soul.


beginning, not begging.

/I am drunk
 
2014-02-06 11:13:20 PM  

Flint Ironstag: Or, on the other side, Costco. Why pay far more than Sams Club and are also far more profitable.


They both earn the same $2 billion in profit, but Sam's earns the same profit on half the sales.

I joined Costco because it was a an easy decision - they treat their employees well.  But they are not as profitable as Sam's based on sales.  My biggest worry is that someone in the Costco CEO chain is going to think that they can get $4 billion in profit if they start acting like Sam's.

The bulk of Costco's and Sam's profit comes from their membership sales, but Sam's charges less, so they pay their employees less.  I'm hoping people realize Costco is just a better option all around, but the next ten years will settle the warehouse store wars.  BJ's will probably be the first to go, and then the other two will duke it out.
 
2014-02-06 11:16:41 PM  

TedCruz'sCrazyDad: Why would anyone be an assistant manager at Walmart for 10 years without making GM?


Because you want to keep your job.

Bentonville makes demands that are flat out impossible to meet. They want everything perfect for inspections but they refuse to give you enough hours to do what needs to be done. That's where these news stories about managers making people work off the clock come from. True, WMT does have policies against such a thing. But it's also nearly impossible to keep everything running perfectly with the resources the higher ups make available. Store and district managers tend not to last long precisely for this reason- the metrics upon which they are evaluated are things over which they tend to have very little control. You can't keep shelves fully stocked if you don't have any hours. You can't keep the bathrooms clean and stocked if you can't buy supplies. So you either break the rules to do it or you suffer the consequences if you get inspected when things have gone to hell.

If you stay below store management level it's easier to stick around because you're insulated from that. But go above that and it's your ass on the line when the bigwigs give you the responsibility to do something but not the authority to get it done. It's classic crappy leadership- if you give somebody a task you damn well had better give them the authority/ability to do it. But corporate is more interested in hitting quarterly targets than in making sure things work well.
 
2014-02-06 11:21:22 PM  

Needlessly Complicated: mrlewish: Seems to me that instead of a changing culture at Walmart the author became more aware of his surroundings.

Did you miss the "retaliating against anyone who won't toe the line" parts? There were several. And par for the course at most places.

/Can't remember working anywhere that cared what I thought about anything. Ok, maybe one place.


toe...lolz. you guys are so amusing

/i'll get you a toe...
 
2014-02-06 11:22:36 PM  

TedCruz'sCrazyDad: Why would anyone be an assistant manager at Walmart for 10 years without making GM?


this isn't the 1950's or 60's? did u miss the part about no promotions, no raises?
 
2014-02-06 11:24:11 PM  

Nemo's Brother: Nemo's Brother: Lsherm: Darth_Lukecash: IT WAS the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way- in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.

-Shia Lebouf

Man, I hated reading Charles Dickens in school.  That man could say absolutely nothing with an alarming amount of words.

Dickens was wordy (he was paid by the word for much of his work) but if you don't see the brilliance of the begging of A Tale of Two Cities, you have no soul.

beginning, not begging.

/I am drunk


i am also drunk. it's all we have left men...
 
2014-02-06 11:25:07 PM  

Lsherm: Darth_Lukecash: IT WAS the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way- in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.

-Shia Lebouf

Man, I hated reading Charles Dickens in school.  That man could say absolutely nothing with an alarming amount of words.


Which is weird because somehow Dickens is considered a major figure both in English Lit and in Social Realism.  Perhaps you missed something.
 
2014-02-06 11:26:09 PM  

Nemo's Brother: Nemo's Brother: Lsherm: Darth_Lukecash: IT WAS the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way- in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.

-Shia Lebouf

Man, I hated reading Charles Dickens in school.  That man could say absolutely nothing with an alarming amount of words.

Dickens was wordy (he was paid by the word for much of his work) but if you don't see the brilliance of the begging of A Tale of Two Cities, you have no soul.

beginning, not begging.

/I am drunk


I wasn't complaining about the beginning of a Tale of Two Cities, I was complaining about Dicken's whole writing style.  The man was just too wordy, ultimately to the detriment of his story.  At least to me.  It's only my opinion, and I'm not an English major, professor, or anyone claiming authority on the art of writing.

I appreciate the well written word - most people hate Moby Dick and I liked it because of the detail.  But something about Dickens just struck me as excessive use of words for no reason.  My high school English teacher and I fought about it to no end.  She used to (correctly) argue that I wasn't reading it with the same sensibility as his original audience, but then I would (correctly) argue that without teaching that context, it was pointless to have us read his work.  At least when we read Shakespeare we had footnotes to fill us in on the jokes we certainly weren't going to get on our own.

Still, you don't have these arguments about Twain or Steinbeck because those guys knew how to write a ripping good yarn.  Dickens knew how to write.  I'll leave it at that.
 
2014-02-06 11:30:23 PM  

some_beer_drinker: TedCruz'sCrazyDad: Why would anyone be an assistant manager at Walmart for 10 years without making GM?

this isn't the 1950's or 60's? did u miss the part about no promotions, no raises?




Walmart opened like 2,000 stores in that time period.
 
2014-02-06 11:32:25 PM  

twistedmetal: [i.huffpost.com image 850x573]
As long as I get my bonus!


Jesus muther farking CHRIST! Just look at that face! Right wingers really are Freaks of Nature!
 
2014-02-06 11:35:41 PM  
Man, fark rich people....born with that silver spoon.  These worthless fark are going to have to pa their fair share.  Hopefully sooner than later.
 
2014-02-06 11:41:32 PM  
Well, where do I start...I have been a professional IT consultant for upwards of 15 years now.  I have worked in just about every industry there is.  By far and away (and I mean by miles!) WalMart was the worst, most evil, black-hearted corporation I have ever been associated with.  They play off of the low self-esteem of their employees (you will never get a job anywhere else, you need WalMart - look for this the next time you go into a WalMart) and destroy any concept their employees have of self worth to support the overall greed of the company management (sidenote, I think a company needs to be measured on bith its profitability as well as its contribution to society as a whole).   Working in Bentonville was one of the most surreal experiences I have ever had in my professional career.  It was either the WalMart way or the highway.  I have had many PITA clients over the last 15 years, but WalMart was the only one I ever walked away from without any regrets at all...
 
2014-02-06 11:41:33 PM  

Lsherm: Nemo's Brother: Nemo's Brother: Lsherm: Darth_Lukecash: IT WAS the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way- in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.

-Shia Lebouf

Man, I hated reading Charles Dickens in school.  That man could say absolutely nothing with an alarming amount of words.

Dickens was wordy (he was paid by the word for much of his work) but if you don't see the brilliance of the begging of A Tale of Two Cities, you have no soul.

beginning, not begging.

/I am drunk

I wasn't complaining about the beginning of a Tale of Two Cities, I was complaining about Dicken's whole writing style.  The man was just too wordy, ultimately to the detriment of his story.  At least to me.  It's only my opinion, and I'm not an English major, professor, or anyone claiming authority on the art of writing.

I appreciate the well written word - most people hate Moby Dick and I liked it because of the detail.  But something about Dickens just struck me as excessive use of words for no reason.  My high school English teacher and I fought about it to no end.  She used to (correctly) argue that I wasn't reading it with the same sensibility as his original audience, but then I would (correctly) argue that without teaching that context, it was pointless to have us read his work.  At least when we read Shakespeare we had footnotes to fill us in on the jokes we certainly weren't going to get on our own.

Still, you don't have these arguments about Twain or Steinbeck because ...


Fair enough. I'm not a huge Dickens fan. I just think A Tale starts with a grand slam.
 
2014-02-06 11:42:41 PM  
My shocked face. Let me show you it.
This is what most other corporations would do if they could get away with it, and why the working class (those with any sense) despise them.
Meanwhile, the Walton kids (actually their maids) are using hundred dollar bills to wipe their kitchen countertops.
/assholes
 
2014-02-06 11:44:31 PM  

ReapTheChaos: "Their over all view point is that there is little difference in performance and return on investment from a ten year associate and a new hire."

Because there isn't, that's the problem with unskilled labor. Why give someone a raise when they could hire a replacement and have them fully trained in two days.


This is simply false. "Unskilled" is such a bullshiat term. I guarantee you somebody that's been sweeping the floors, stocking the shelves, flipping burgers or whatever for a year is going to be much better at it than somebody you just trained up. Fully trained is not the same as practiced or efficient.
 
2014-02-06 11:46:27 PM  

wraith95: ReapTheChaos: "Their over all view point is that there is little difference in performance and return on investment from a ten year associate and a new hire."

Because there isn't, that's the problem with unskilled labor. Why give someone a raise when they could hire a replacement and have them fully trained in two days.

This is simply false. "Unskilled" is such a bullshiat term. I guarantee you somebody that's been sweeping the floors, stocking the shelves, flipping burgers or whatever for a year is going to be much better at it than somebody you just trained up. Fully trained is not the same as practiced or efficient.


Agreed. Bean-counting MBAs (The true unskilled labor in the country) doesn't realize this. They see any employee as simply a red in the ledger. A friendly, efficient cashier, a competent sales floor employee or speeding stocker are worth their weigh in gold.
 
2014-02-06 11:48:35 PM  

Nemo's Brother: Hillary had to get her executive salary from somewhere.


From the article, it sounds like the place turned evil as soon as Hillary left the board.  Shame.
 
2014-02-06 11:51:15 PM  

Lsherm: Nemo's Brother: Nemo's Brother: Lsherm: Darth_Lukecash: IT WAS the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way- in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.

-Shia Lebouf

Man, I hated reading Charles Dickens in school.  That man could say absolutely nothing with an alarming amount of words.

Dickens was wordy (he was paid by the word for much of his work) but if you don't see the brilliance of the begging of A Tale of Two Cities, you have no soul.

beginning, not begging.

/I am drunk

I wasn't complaining about the beginning of a Tale of Two Cities, I was complaining about Dicken's whole writing style.  The man was just too wordy, ultimately to the detriment of his story.  At least to me.  It's only my opinion, and I'm not an English major, professor, or anyone claiming authority on the art of writing.

I appreciate the well written word - most people hate Moby Dick and I liked it because of the detail.  But something about Dickens just struck me as excessive use of words for no reason.  My high school English teacher and I fought about it to no end.  She used to (correctly) argue that I wasn't reading it with the same sensibility as his original audience, but then I would (correctly) argue that without teaching that context, it was pointless to have us read his work.  At least when we read Shakespeare we had footnotes to fill us in on the jokes we certainly weren't going to get on our own.

Still, you don't have these arguments about Twain or Steinbeck because ...


I refuse to support Dickens because of his stance on gay marriage.  The guy was a first degree bigot.

/and yes, I am glad that he is dead.
 
2014-02-07 12:01:29 AM  
For someone that has "multiple degrees", this guy can't write worth a shiat.
 
2014-02-07 12:01:45 AM  

MFAWG: SCUBA_Archer: But $15 minimum wage will cure all!/stocked shelves will be a thing of the past

WalMart is paying less now to start than they did when this guy started. Think about that, and then go home and get your shine box, wanker.


Because government regulations will totally change Walmart's culture THIS TIME
 
2014-02-07 12:05:45 AM  

debug: For someone that has "multiple degrees", this guy can't write worth a shiat.


I'm guessing an English/Business degree from back in the day.  Dual majors weren't unusual when college was cheaper.

But I'm also wondering why someone with two degrees is still at Walmart, even professionally.  They don't treat their white collar workers any better.
 
2014-02-07 12:09:32 AM  

Outtaphase: I walked into a Target around opening time on a normal day once, almost no customers yet. I walked down an aisle to see over a dozen employees gathered in a circle being talked to. Then they all went into some sort of dance/chant thing with a lot of clapping that made a birthday party at Chucky Cheese seem less embarrassing.

It was like a scene out of Full Metal Jacket. I realized all of the big box stores were the same.


Saw this at a Sam's Club circa 1999 at 7:00 am. I thought I was at a high school pep rally for a moment.
 
2014-02-07 12:18:18 AM  

ReapTheChaos: "Their over all view point is that there is little difference in performance and return on investment from a ten year associate and a new hire."

Because there isn't, that's the problem with unskilled labor. Why give someone a raise when they could hire a replacement and have them fully trained in two days.


Who trains that replacement?  One of Walmart's problems is they're going with temp or extremely part time labor and the turnover is so fast no one bothers training the new people.  Which piles up the disaster as you go.
 
2014-02-07 01:23:04 AM  

akula: Bentonville makes demands that are flat out impossible to meet. They want everything perfect for inspections but they refuse to give you enough hours to do what needs to be done. That's where these news stories about managers making people work off the clock come from. True, WMT does have policies against such a thing. But it's also nearly impossible to keep everything running perfectly with the resources the higher ups make available. Store and district managers tend not to last long precisely for this reason- the metrics upon which they are evaluated are things over which they tend to have very little control. You can't keep shelves fully stocked if you don't have any hours. You can't keep the bathrooms clean and stocked if you can't buy supplies. So you either break the rules to do it or you suffer the consequences if you get inspected when things have gone to hell.

If you stay below store management level it's easier to stick around because you're insulated from that. But go above that and it's your ass on the line when the bigwigs give you the responsibility to do something but not the authority to get it done. It's classic crappy leadership- if you give somebody a task you damn well had better give them the authority/ability to do it. But corporate is more interested in hitting quarterly targets than in making sure things work well.


Sounds a lot like one of Wal-Mart's competitors.  Amazingly that company went to Hell in a handbasket while Wal-Mart thrived.

/worked for the competitor for over nine years
 
Displayed 50 of 77 comments


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all


View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter






In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report