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(The Wire)   A map of major US cities that show where people go running most often; and by "running" they presumably mean "for exercise" and not "from the police" or "for their lives"   (thewire.com) divider line 109
    More: Interesting, major us cities, exercises, European cities  
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4856 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 Feb 2014 at 12:31 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-02-06 04:33:30 PM  

ZAZ: For those of you not from the Boston area, the "Charles River" is in fact made of water. I have not noticed purple runners dashing diagonally across it instead of using the bridges.


I used to work on the Nike + project, and we'd have heat maps of runners throughout the world (where most people were running based on their GPS locations).  Since the GPS only pings at least once every 15 seconds, even if there are no GPS errors or physical obstructions to receiving a clean GPS signal, you'll still get weird diagonals.  What you're seeing there are the errors (on that scale).  Sometimes (especially older devices), may not get a reliable GPS signal for a few minutes.
 
2014-02-06 04:36:11 PM  

ChipNASA: Hey Noo Yawk....
FARK YOO TOO

[cdn.theatlanticcities.com image 509x1035]


Cut the artery.  Up the street, not across the road.
 
2014-02-06 04:39:35 PM  

northguineahills: ZAZ: For those of you not from the Boston area, the "Charles River" is in fact made of water. I have not noticed purple runners dashing diagonally across it instead of using the bridges.

I used to work on the Nike + project, and we'd have heat maps of runners throughout the world (where most people were running based on their GPS locations).  Since the GPS only pings at least once every 15 seconds, even if there are no GPS errors or physical obstructions to receiving a clean GPS signal, you'll still get weird diagonals.  What you're seeing there are the errors (on that scale).  Sometimes (especially older devices), may not get a reliable GPS signal for a few minutes.


IN real time? That's kind of creepy.
 
2014-02-06 05:04:34 PM  

Nogale: northguineahills: ZAZ: For those of you not from the Boston area, the "Charles River" is in fact made of water. I have not noticed purple runners dashing diagonally across it instead of using the bridges.

I used to work on the Nike + project, and we'd have heat maps of runners throughout the world (where most people were running based on their GPS locations).  Since the GPS only pings at least once every 15 seconds, even if there are no GPS errors or physical obstructions to receiving a clean GPS signal, you'll still get weird diagonals.  What you're seeing there are the errors (on that scale).  Sometimes (especially older devices), may not get a reliable GPS signal for a few minutes.

IN real time? That's kind of creepy.


Not real time, cached and aggregated w/ at least 10,000 data points (each GPS ping) to help ensure anonymity.
 
2014-02-06 05:32:42 PM  

northguineahills: ZAZ: For those of you not from the Boston area, the "Charles River" is in fact made of water. I have not noticed purple runners dashing diagonally across it instead of using the bridges.

I used to work on the Nike + project, and we'd have heat maps of runners throughout the world (where most people were running based on their GPS locations).  Since the GPS only pings at least once every 15 seconds, even if there are no GPS errors or physical obstructions to receiving a clean GPS signal, you'll still get weird diagonals.  What you're seeing there are the errors (on that scale).  Sometimes (especially older devices), may not get a reliable GPS signal for a few minutes.


Most of what you're seeing with long straight lines is people who didn't stop recording, but drove home/work after the workout. I have several Strava KOMs where I frequently get bumped by a mountain biker on his way home with the Garmin still running. I think Strava's detection of that stuff is improving though, as it's a lot more rare these days, and I doubt their users have become more attentive.
 
2014-02-06 05:52:33 PM  

waterrockets: Here's the cycling heat map (generated by Strava). You can browse around anywhere in the world:  http://raceshape.com/heatmap/

/I full-stop at stop signs, bike or car.


I live in New Orleans- while most of it seems accurate, there's some funkiness to those results (for my city).

1.  There's a major busy street (St. Claude) with a dedicated and safe bike lane.  That map shows no color there.

2. It shows color going over the Crescent City Connection bridge- which is an interstate, cars-only, and no way that I know of to get a bike on there.
 
2014-02-06 06:29:31 PM  

jxb465: The human body isn't really made for long-distance running, just sprinting and walking.


The opposite really. Humans are freakishly suited for easy jogging. Basically only some wild horses can compete on that front.
 
2014-02-06 06:37:52 PM  

Tyrone Biggums: There is a couple that does this in my neighborhood as well. Heavy snowstorm, temps around zero, 30 mph winds? Yep.

And they are usually out early in the morning when it is still dark out. I saw them out a few days ago during the snowstorm, running in the middle of the street. I think they have a death wish. If the cold doesn't get them I bet a car or a plow will. I mean I like running myself, but there is a time when ya might want to put that gym membership or treadmill to use.


That's my point. There are plenty of times when sure, go for a jog, groove on your bad self. And then there are times you're just a moron with a deathwish.
 
2014-02-06 11:54:39 PM  

downstairs: waterrockets: Here's the cycling heat map (generated by Strava). You can browse around anywhere in the world:  http://raceshape.com/heatmap/

/I full-stop at stop signs, bike or car.

I live in New Orleans- while most of it seems accurate, there's some funkiness to those results (for my city).

1.  There's a major busy street (St. Claude) with a dedicated and safe bike lane.  That map shows no color there.

2. It shows color going over the Crescent City Connection bridge- which is an interstate, cars-only, and no way that I know of to get a bike on there.


St. Claude does have some blue on it near Franklin. The rest of it just must not be that popular with Strava users. I've done probably 1000 Strava rides out of my house, and my street doesn't show any color.

That Crescent City Connection bridge color must be from commuters running strava on the bus with their bikes in the racks
 
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