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(Independent)   The latest dire threat to our economy is ... *spins wheel* ... dressing your daughter in pink   (independent.co.uk) divider line 68
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3694 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 Feb 2014 at 1:41 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-02-06 04:32:30 PM  

Nurglitch: umad: Just one more step in feminism's march to irrelevance.

Feminism is always relevant, although the particular application and variety might leave something to be desired. I dropped my toddler off at daycare today wearing pink mainly because pink is a soothing, calming colour and maybe it would reduce her hobby of stabbing people.


img.fark.net
 
2014-02-06 04:36:27 PM  
Why is it that there has been a trend to take gender neutral toys and make versions specifically for girls? Look at the original toys like etch-a-sketch, or slinky, or lite brite, or lego, or any number of all around neutral toys. And then look at the number of recently added pink/purple versions 'For Girls' that have come out. Is there some sort of hidden message that girls can't play with anything unless there's a version specifically for them? Is 'neutral' not good enough?

/and I spent most of TFA wondering WTF a pushchair was
//farking british and their inability to speak proper english
 
2014-02-06 04:41:03 PM  

AntiGravitas: My daughter dresses herself in pink and I buy her the toys she asks for.

FTA:  ""Why should girls be brought up in an all-pink environment? It's now got to the point where it is difficult to buy toys for girls in particular, which are not pink, princess-primed and/or fairy-infused."

Know why this is true?  Because they toy makers follow the PROFITS!  They sell what the girls want, not set the standard.  Good grief.


Little girls didn't demand pink until they were told to. In fact, it used to be that pink was for boys and blue for girls. And before that? Blue for blondes, pink for brunettes -- but this meant that people could reuse all the same stuff for babies of different sexes. Department stores wanted to sell twice as much crap, so they started color-coding the genders.

Don't believe me? Look it up. It is easily accessible information.

Don't assume little girls want pink -- like everyone else, they want to fit in. If they're told that liking pink is how they do that, if that's supposed to be part of what defines them as girls, then they'll express a preference for pink. And the little girls who hate pink? Little girls who hate dolls and homemaking toys? Well, it really sucks for them.

How are little girls supposed to become architects if they can't even have REAL legos?
 
2014-02-06 04:43:28 PM  

Miss Alexandra: I've heard stories about parents trying to raise their kids "gender-neutral."  The girls still want to go for the dolls, or use the bed of a toy pick-up truck as a cradle, the boys still go for the toy soldiers.

My 12-year-old son is slightly autistic.  He loves toy cars.  He loves taking things apart, and building things--and he's pretty good with tools.  For all I know he may one day be an engineer, but people like that might think I'm limiting him if I don't buy him Barbie dolls and try to get him interested in fashion design.


Really? All girls go for dolls, huh? All boys love toy cars?

Do you even listen to yourself?

It's not about raising kids gender neutral -- it's about not painting them into corners. You don't have to pick cars or dolls -- kids of both genders should be able to freely choose both and many would if not for the stigma and incredible social pressure to conform to stated gender norms.
 
2014-02-06 04:44:14 PM  

weltallica: [2.bp.blogspot.com image 600x400]

Yeah, because if you're not a girly girl in pink, you grow up to be a rough-housing tomboy lesbian.


NTTAWWT
 
2014-02-06 04:55:18 PM  
Paging Sheriff Joe.
 
2014-02-06 04:56:59 PM  

ennuie: AntiGravitas: My daughter dresses herself in pink and I buy her the toys she asks for.

FTA:  ""Why should girls be brought up in an all-pink environment? It's now got to the point where it is difficult to buy toys for girls in particular, which are not pink, princess-primed and/or fairy-infused."

Know why this is true?  Because they toy makers follow the PROFITS!  They sell what the girls want, not set the standard.  Good grief.

Little girls didn't demand pink until they were told to. In fact, it used to be that pink was for boys and blue for girls. And before that? Blue for blondes, pink for brunettes -- but this meant that people could reuse all the same stuff for babies of different sexes. Department stores wanted to sell twice as much crap, so they started color-coding the genders.

Don't believe me? Look it up. It is easily accessible information.

Don't assume little girls want pink -- like everyone else, they want to fit in. If they're told that liking pink is how they do that, if that's supposed to be part of what defines them as girls, then they'll express a preference for pink. And the little girls who hate pink? Little girls who hate dolls and homemaking toys? Well, it really sucks for them.

How are little girls supposed to become architects if they can't even have REAL legos?


Exactly.  They want to fit in.  And if mom and dad go all gender "deconstruction" they will likely do what mom and dad tell them to fit in with them.  So they are never really "liberated from gender constructs" they just switch where they are trying to fit in.

And I do not know a girl who felt TRAPPED by hating dolls and homemaking toys.  The ones I know just go get the toys from the "boys" section.   I think adults think about this WAY MUCH MORE than the kiddos do.
 
2014-02-06 05:10:23 PM  

AntiGravitas: ennuie: AntiGravitas: My daughter dresses herself in pink and I buy her the toys she asks for.

FTA:  ""Why should girls be brought up in an all-pink environment? It's now got to the point where it is difficult to buy toys for girls in particular, which are not pink, princess-primed and/or fairy-infused."

Know why this is true?  Because they toy makers follow the PROFITS!  They sell what the girls want, not set the standard.  Good grief.

Little girls didn't demand pink until they were told to. In fact, it used to be that pink was for boys and blue for girls. And before that? Blue for blondes, pink for brunettes -- but this meant that people could reuse all the same stuff for babies of different sexes. Department stores wanted to sell twice as much crap, so they started color-coding the genders.

Don't believe me? Look it up. It is easily accessible information.

Don't assume little girls want pink -- like everyone else, they want to fit in. If they're told that liking pink is how they do that, if that's supposed to be part of what defines them as girls, then they'll express a preference for pink. And the little girls who hate pink? Little girls who hate dolls and homemaking toys? Well, it really sucks for them.

How are little girls supposed to become architects if they can't even have REAL legos?

Exactly.  They want to fit in.  And if mom and dad go all gender "deconstruction" they will likely do what mom and dad tell them to fit in with them.  So they are never really "liberated from gender constructs" they just switch where they are trying to fit in.

And I do not know a girl who felt TRAPPED by hating dolls and homemaking toys.  The ones I know just go get the toys from the "boys" section.   I think adults think about this WAY MUCH MORE than the kiddos do.


You know one now. It didn't help that I grew up in the Bible Belt. It was a constant stream of strangers and people I barely knew butting in on me and my parents and telling us that I didn't dress right and didn't play with the right toys (I liked building models and playing with dinosaurs). Despite outperforming male classmates in math and science, it took a long time to have any teachers suggest careers in math and science to me; first it was journalism, then being a lawyer -- because smart girls should go into languagey stuff, and logical girls should too.

You shouldn't raise kids to have no construct of gender (which is NOT what raising gender-neutral means despite the way people use the term here), but you're supposed to not foist anything on them. Some kids of either sex will really like what we think of as feminine toys, and some kids of both sexes will really like what we call masculine toys, and lots of kids will like some mixture. And that shouldn't say anything about who or what they can be. Childhood is a time to find out who you are and to explore being all kinds of people, not just through play, but through daily interactions. Instead people insist on telling kids who they are. It's crappy.
 
2014-02-06 05:51:05 PM  
Jenny Willott, the Minister for Employment Relations and Consumer Affairs and probable Mommy-blogger, expressed her opposition to the gender-specific marketing of children's toys

FTFY.
 
2014-02-06 06:06:15 PM  

Ambitwistor: AntiGravitas: FTA:  ""Why should girls be brought up in an all-pink environment? It's now got to the point where it is difficult to buy toys for girls in particular, which are not pink, princess-primed and/or fairy-infused."

Know why this is true?  Because they toy makers follow the PROFITS!  They sell what the girls want, not set the standard.  Good grief.

That's simplistic.  There's a feedback loop here.  Pink wasn't even originally a girl color.  But it became popular, partly through marketing, and then a "phase transition" occurred:  once enough girls wanted pink, their peers wanted pink too.  So yes, they are setting a standard, and following the profits.


That sounds like a "chicken or egg" explanation. Didn't this topic show up on FARK last week? Buying overpriced plastic crap for kids is nonsense anyway, give them a big brown cardboard box and let them use their imagination.
 
2014-02-06 06:11:58 PM  
Pink is a boys' color.
 
2014-02-06 06:38:14 PM  
Every day I wake up wishing I was privileged enough that the colour of a child's toy was the biggest problem in my life.
 
2014-02-06 06:45:56 PM  

baconbeard: Every day I wake up wishing I was privileged enough that the colour of a child's toy was the biggest problem in my life.


Sorry to hear of your misfortunes. You may take a small measure of comfort in the fact that nobody in the history of humanity has ever thought the color of a child's toy was the biggest problem in their life.
 
2014-02-06 06:49:39 PM  
As the first time father of a little girl who's not yet 1 year old, I didn't realize that "back in the day" pink was the masculine color.  At least for a little while.  Apparently back before the mid 19th century, kids wore "kids" clothes, and they were gender neutral.  Then color crept in, with blue being for girls and pink being for boys.  Around the 1940's, that flipped around again to what it is today.  Honestly, the gender neutral stuff would be nice.  We've got plenty of "girly" clothes, both in color and imagery/frills, but we've been trying to get more neutral stuff in preparation for #2 somewhere down the line.  We'd like to buy as few new clothes as possible, since they grow out of them so fast.

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/when-did-girls-start-wear in g-pink-1370097/

"It's really a story of what happened to neutral clothing," says Paoletti, who has explored the meaning of children's clothing for 30 years. For centuries, she says, children wore dainty white dresses up to age 6. "What was once a matter of practicality-you dress your baby in white dresses and diapers; white cotton can be bleached-became a matter of 'Oh my God, if I dress my baby in the wrong thing, they'll grow up perverted,' " Paoletti says.
The march toward gender-specific clothes was neither linear nor rapid. Pink and blue arrived, along with other pastels, as colors for babies in the mid-19th century, yet the two colors were not promoted as gender signifiers until just before World War I-and even then, it took time for popular culture to sort things out.
For example, a June 1918 article from the trade publication Earnshaw's Infants' Department said, "The generally accepted rule is pink for the boys, and blue for the girls. The reason is that pink, being a more decided and stronger color, is more suitable for the boy, while blue, which is more delicate and dainty, is prettier for the girl." Other sources said blue was flattering for blonds, pink for brunettes; or blue was for blue-eyed babies, pink for brown-eyed babies, according to Paoletti.
In 1927, Time magazine printed a chart showing sex-appropriate colors for girls and boys according to leading U.S. stores. In Boston, Filene's told parents to dress boys in pink. So did Best & Co. in New York City, Halle's in Cleveland and Marshall Field in Chicago.
Today's color dictate wasn't established until the 1940s, as a result of Americans' preferences as interpreted by manufacturers and retailers. "It could have gone the other way," Paoletti says.
So the baby boomers were raised in gender-specific clothing. Boys dressed like their fathers, girls like their mothers. Girls had to wear dresses to school, though unadorned styles and tomboy play clothes were acceptable.
 
2014-02-06 07:00:46 PM  

vudukungfu: The problem with encouraging girls to wear pink is they grow up to be women.
Women should not wear pink.
It only encourages fat women to wear pink.
When fat women wear pink, they look like sows, bleached hippos, those dancing hippo ballerinas from that Disney movie. Babby elephants.
No one wants to see that.
Stop encouraging girls to wear pink.

Dont' get me started on purple.
Both colors are indications there is something fraked up between her ears.
Purple is more stabby than pink, but both are daddy issue colors.


-- Reminds me of a DirecTV commercial, rolling with it.

When you wear pink, flamingos decide the color has been done.
When flamingos decide the color has been done, they evolve into hipster birds.
When flamingos evolve into hipster birds, they give up chirping and start singing show tunes.
When flamingos sing show tunes, sparrows take up death metal.
When sparrows take up death metal, you wake up early on your weekend.
Don't wake up early on your weekend.
 
2014-02-06 10:27:49 PM  
I thought Despicable Me 2 was surprisingly feminist in a way.  The opening scene was a birthday party Gru was giving for Agens (his youngest daughter), who is looking forward to a visit from the fairy princess (wearing pink, of course).  Meanwhile, her older sister is dressed all in black, has a ninja sword, and charges through an obstacle course full of traps.

Maybe I am reading too much into it, but the message seemed to be that girls can love (or want to be) pink fairy princesses and/or deadly ninjas, and both are equally valid.
 
2014-02-06 11:07:59 PM  
Pink?

They all are, on the inside.
 
2014-02-07 11:33:14 AM  
We must all try as hard as possible to make people out of the norm feel more comfortable
 
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