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(Yahoo)   Ireland marks a nearly rain-free day for the first time since when, never? And there are radar images to prove it   (uk.news.yahoo.com) divider line 37
    More: Cool, Ireland, radars, woolly mammoths, rains  
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2028 clicks; posted to Geek » on 06 Feb 2014 at 12:12 PM (37 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



37 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-02-06 12:21:33 PM  
Horse shoes and hand grenades, Ireland.
 
2014-02-06 12:22:26 PM  
Kudos for Subby using "rain-free" instead of "dry" to describe Ireland. Army intelligence, etc...
 
2014-02-06 12:28:40 PM  
I used to live in Ireland and I have to say it didn't rain all the time. Occasionally we had whole hours when it wasn't raining.
 
2014-02-06 12:32:40 PM  
Global warm...uh, coolin...um, climate change!
 
2014-02-06 12:35:16 PM  
From the "Other Stories" below...

Phone use now permitted during "all phases" of Ryanair flights. Aer Lingus? Not yet

Damn, that sounds like an airline with a 'cunning' business model...
 
2014-02-06 12:36:53 PM  
Ireland

has not altered;--
a place as kind as it is green,
the greenest place I've never seen.
Every name is a tune.

(Marianne Moore, "Spenser's Ireland")

Except I have seen it, and it's about as green as Kentucky. It was cold when we were there --right at 33 for our whole trip. And misty. Always misting. When we went out to Newgrange. there were 2 little boys dressed in tee shirts. They played barefoot around the site and made me feel like a very old man.

But there was a lovely clerk -- Aoife -- in a department store off Grafton Street . I'm glad someone called to her before I tried to pronounce her name.
 
2014-02-06 12:38:42 PM  
It can't stop raining! Think of the peat bogs! What will they use to char the barrels for whiskey if the bogs dry out?!

Global Climate Change affecting my whiskey? Work to end it now!
 
2014-02-06 12:42:40 PM  
Time to bring out the patio furniture?
 
2014-02-06 12:46:01 PM  
no wonder the Irish can be so cranky.
 
2014-02-06 12:47:20 PM  

yakmans_dad: Ireland

has not altered;--
a place as kind as it is green,
the greenest place I've never seen.
Every name is a tune.

(Marianne Moore, "Spenser's Ireland")

Except I have seen it, and it's about as green as Kentucky. It was cold when we were there --right at 33 for our whole trip. And misty. Always misting. When we went out to Newgrange. there were 2 little boys dressed in tee shirts. They played barefoot around the site and made me feel like a very old man.

But there was a lovely clerk -- Aoife -- in a department store off Grafton Street . I'm glad someone called to her before I tried to pronounce her name.


Ireland is a lot better on paper than in person.  It's not a bad country, IMHO, but I feel like it's over-hyped.  At least in the US.
 
2014-02-06 12:49:16 PM  
It must have something to do with the Irish bankers on trial.
 
2014-02-06 01:27:11 PM  

yakmans_dad: But there was a lovely clerk -- Aoife -- in a department store off Grafton Street . I'm glad someone called to her before I tried to pronounce her name.


It was pronounced "Alice", right?
 
2014-02-06 01:34:54 PM  
I spent a summer (1975) in Ireland as a wee lad living with my mother's family, and they were in the midst
of a horrible drought that turned the Forty Shades of Green to Forty Shades of Brown.

Even still:  it was often overcast and misting.
 
2014-02-06 01:40:40 PM  

Fark_Guy_Rob: yakmans_dad: Ireland

has not altered;--
a place as kind as it is green,
the greenest place I've never seen.
Every name is a tune.

(Marianne Moore, "Spenser's Ireland")

Except I have seen it, and it's about as green as Kentucky. It was cold when we were there --right at 33 for our whole trip. And misty. Always misting. When we went out to Newgrange. there were 2 little boys dressed in tee shirts. They played barefoot around the site and made me feel like a very old man.

But there was a lovely clerk -- Aoife -- in a department store off Grafton Street . I'm glad someone called to her before I tried to pronounce her name.

Ireland is a lot better on paper than in person.  It's not a bad country, IMHO, but I feel like it's over-hyped.  At least in the US.


To hear many Americans talk about Ireland, you'd think that it was still 1847 when you land at Shannon and 1972 in Belfast.(socially in both places it's about 1955)... I think it comes from the fact that Irish Americans are prone to mythologizing their history more than most. And worse, oversimplifying the whole deal. The island itself is gorgeous, but again, it's mostly farm country. Whee! Farms! You can't grow crops on the Causeway, Belfast is a working city, well, sort of, and Dublin's there for administration. The rest? Crops. Sheep. Cows. Occaisionally whiskey. Some beer. Lots of Culchies.Some Jackeens.
 
2014-02-06 01:58:59 PM  

theorellior: yakmans_dad: But there was a lovely clerk -- Aoife -- in a department store off Grafton Street . I'm glad someone called to her before I tried to pronounce her name.

It was pronounced "Alice", right?


Throatwarbler Mangrove
 
2014-02-06 02:01:45 PM  

Linux_Yes: no wonder the Irish can be so cranky.


That's them Scots

/The Irish are irascible
 
2014-02-06 02:03:47 PM  

mainsail: I think it comes from the fact that Irish Americans are prone to mythologizing their history more than most.


People of Irish descent prone to exaggerating stories and turning minor details into enormous events?

youdontsay.jpg

/The only people who tell more fish stories than the Irish are sailors
//Irish sailors on the other hand are incredibly cynical, go figure
///That last one wasn't true.
 
2014-02-06 02:39:14 PM  

mainsail: Fark_Guy_Rob: yakmans_dad: Ireland

has not altered;--
a place as kind as it is green,
the greenest place I've never seen.
Every name is a tune.

(Marianne Moore, "Spenser's Ireland")

Except I have seen it, and it's about as green as Kentucky. It was cold when we were there --right at 33 for our whole trip. And misty. Always misting. When we went out to Newgrange. there were 2 little boys dressed in tee shirts. They played barefoot around the site and made me feel like a very old man.

But there was a lovely clerk -- Aoife -- in a department store off Grafton Street . I'm glad someone called to her before I tried to pronounce her name.

Ireland is a lot better on paper than in person.  It's not a bad country, IMHO, but I feel like it's over-hyped.  At least in the US.

To hear many Americans talk about Ireland, you'd think that it was still 1847 when you land at Shannon and 1972 in Belfast.(socially in both places it's about 1955)... I think it comes from the fact that Irish Americans are prone to mythologizing their history more than most. And worse, oversimplifying the whole deal. The island itself is gorgeous, but again, it's mostly farm country. Whee! Farms! You can't grow crops on the Causeway, Belfast is a working city, well, sort of, and Dublin's there for administration. The rest? Crops. Sheep. Cows. Occaisionally whiskey. Some beer. Lots of Culchies.Some Jackeens.


I've heard Ireland described as the only 3rd world country in the EU, and though things got much better
during the 90s & early 2000s with the whole 'Celtic Tiger' thing, its really not far off the mark.

I was very lucky inasmuchas my mom is from County Roscommon, which is the Irish equivalent of North
Dakota:  there are more sheep and cows than people by a factor of at least 10, and though they have
things like smart phones & internet connectivity, by and large the lifestyle and attitudes haven't changed
much since the 1950s (coincidentally, that's when my mom came to the US).  Outside of agriculture, there
isn't much 'there' there, and in hindsight spending 6 weeks there at the age of 10 was just the thing I
needed to see how different things could be from the life we have here in the US and how blessed I was to
be living here.

But while it may not be a tourist spot, Roscommon is a gorgeous place, and the people really can't do
enough for you when you're there, especially if you're family.  But, even then:  almost everyone over
there has someone here in the 'States, and you'll find a picture of JFK in almost every house.
 
2014-02-06 03:18:45 PM  

JayCab: mainsail: I think it comes from the fact that Irish Americans are prone to mythologizing their history more than most.

People of Irish descent prone to exaggerating stories and turning minor details into enormous events?

youdontsay.jpg

/The only people who tell more fish stories than the Irish are sailors
//Irish sailors on the other hand are incredibly cynical, go figure
///That last one wasn't true.


Oooooh yes it is.
 
2014-02-06 03:26:17 PM  
And I nearly banged Kathy Ireland.  So, according to this article and subby, almost doing it counts
 
2014-02-06 03:40:06 PM  

DjangoStonereaver: Outside of agriculture, there
isn't much 'there' there, and in hindsight spending 6 weeks there at the age of 10 was just the thing I
needed to see how different things could be from the life we have here in the US and how blessed I was to
be living here.



Spending some extended time in most any nation outside north america is a good way to appreciate just how good we in north america have it.  Even in the western E.U.  I spent a summer in Denmark and Italy.  As you said, it very very pretty, much history, and many interesting things to see.  But as far as actually living there - good luck finding employment or better yet don't bother, good luck if you are a woman trying to speak in the presence of men, owning a car is not something you do, owning a house other then ancestral family home is definitely not something you ever do, multiple generations living in one small home is the way things are.  Just many things that would be considered "oppressive" or "limiting" or "poor" here are the norm in most places.  Sometimes it amazes me how constantly Americans biatch about being the wealthiest place on earth.
 
2014-02-06 03:40:30 PM  
DjangoStonereaver:But while it may not be a tourist spot, Roscommon is a gorgeous place, and the people really can't do
enough for you when you're there, especially if you're family.  But, even then:  almost everyone over
there has someone here in the 'States, and you'll find a picture of JFK in almost every house.


You forgot "JFK and the current Pope".

I've cycled across and around it three times. It's safe to say I like it.
 
2014-02-06 03:56:07 PM  

ThrobblefootSpectre: DjangoStonereaver: Outside of agriculture, there
isn't much 'there' there, and in hindsight spending 6 weeks there at the age of 10 was just the thing I
needed to see how different things could be from the life we have here in the US and how blessed I was to
be living here.


Spending some extended time in most any nation outside north america is a good way to appreciate just how good we in north america have it.  Even in the western E.U.  I spent a summer in Denmark and Italy.  As you said, it very very pretty, much history, and many interesting things to see.  But as far as actually living there - good luck finding employment or better yet don't bother, good luck if you are a woman trying to speak in the presence of men, owning a car is not something you do, owning a house other then ancestral family home is definitely not something you ever do, multiple generations living in one small home is the way things are.  Just many things that would be considered "oppressive" or "limiting" or "poor" here are the norm in most places.  Sometimes it amazes me how constantly Americans biatch about being the wealthiest place on earth.


Take the Pepsi Challenge.

In Google Maps Street View visit a random place in Sweden and a random place in America. Tell me which you'd prefer.
 
2014-02-06 04:17:33 PM  

yakmans_dad: ThrobblefootSpectre: DjangoStonereaver: Outside of agriculture, there
isn't much 'there' there, and in hindsight spending 6 weeks there at the age of 10 was just the thing I
needed to see how different things could be from the life we have here in the US and how blessed I was to
be living here.


Spending some extended time in most any nation outside north america is a good way to appreciate just how good we in north america have it.  Even in the western E.U.  I spent a summer in Denmark and Italy.  As you said, it very very pretty, much history, and many interesting things to see.  But as far as actually living there - good luck finding employment or better yet don't bother, good luck if you are a woman trying to speak in the presence of men, owning a car is not something you do, owning a house other then ancestral family home is definitely not something you ever do, multiple generations living in one small home is the way things are.  Just many things that would be considered "oppressive" or "limiting" or "poor" here are the norm in most places.  Sometimes it amazes me how constantly Americans biatch about being the wealthiest place on earth.

Take the Pepsi Challenge.

In Google Maps Street View visit a random place in Sweden and a random place in America. Tell me which you'd prefer.


Cycle from Orlando to Daytona Beach. It looks like Ghana after a windstorm, except with more Baptist churches.
 
2014-02-06 04:20:12 PM  
Two years ago during my trip there it only rained once, but we only saw the sky for all of 10 mins in 5 days.

/CSB
 
2014-02-06 04:23:25 PM  

Valiente: Cycle from Orlando to Daytona Beach. It looks like Ghana after a windstorm, except with more Baptist churches.


Oh, crap. The wife and I are doing Disney World in May, driving down from Virginia with a friend. Our route takes us straight from Daytona to Orlando.  Are you saying that I should probably make sure we can do that run without having to get off of the Interstate for gas?
 
2014-02-06 04:24:16 PM  

Valiente: Cycle from Orlando to Daytona Beach. It looks like Ghana after a windstorm, except with more Baptist churches.


Yep, excellent example of typical north american.  "Oh noes! Not everything is landscaped, and maintained by crews, watered to green perfection! The houses aren't 5 room mcmansions!! How can I live in this squalor?  I am opressed!"

*sigh*
 
2014-02-06 04:35:05 PM  

JayCab: Valiente: Cycle from Orlando to Daytona Beach. It looks like Ghana after a windstorm, except with more Baptist churches.

Oh, crap. The wife and I are doing Disney World in May, driving down from Virginia with a friend. Our route takes us straight from Daytona to Orlando.  Are you saying that I should probably make sure we can do that run without having to get off of the Interstate for gas?


If you are afraid of trees, and small 700 sq ft homes in quiet family neighborhoods, occupied by diverse normal non-1% families, then yes.

OTOH - the disney area itself is actually the place where you might want a armed blackwater certified escort.  (Hint :The thugs that prey on tourists don't hang out in quiet family neighborhoods of the local residents.  They hang out at the tourist attractions.  :-)
 
2014-02-06 04:46:21 PM  

ThrobblefootSpectre: DjangoStonereaver: Outside of agriculture, there
isn't much 'there' there, and in hindsight spending 6 weeks there at the age of 10 was just the thing I
needed to see how different things could be from the life we have here in the US and how blessed I was to
be living here.


Spending some extended time in most any nation outside north america is a good way to appreciate just how good we in north america have it.  Even in the western E.U.  I spent a summer in Denmark and Italy.  As you said, it very very pretty, much history, and many interesting things to see.  But as far as actually living there - good luck finding employment or better yet don't bother, good luck if you are a woman trying to speak in the presence of men, owning a car is not something you do, owning a house other then ancestral family home is definitely not something you ever do, multiple generations living in one small home is the way things are.  Just many things that would be considered "oppressive" or "limiting" or "poor" here are the norm in most places.  Sometimes it amazes me how constantly Americans biatch about being the wealthiest place on earth.


So, when did you meet my mother and talk to her about why she decided to emigrate to America?

I love Ireland dearly, as does she, but thanks to her clear eyed descriptions of what her life was like I have
no romanticized Hibernian Society green tinted lenses about the Ol' Sod.

Valiente: DjangoStonereaver:But while it may not be a tourist spot, Roscommon is a gorgeous place, and the people really can't do
enough for you when you're there, especially if you're family.  But, even then:  almost everyone over
there has someone here in the 'States, and you'll find a picture of JFK in almost every house.

You forgot "JFK and the current Pope".

I've cycled across and around it three times. It's safe to say I like it.


For the VERY progressive households (possibly with IRA sympathies), there are more than a few pics of
MLK.  Or maybe that was just my relatives.

And let us not forget "The Three Questions" you will be asked whenever you sit down in any Irish
household:

1> "Would you like a drink?" (Note, a 'drink' is not tea; that you will be served it is a given so they don't
bother to ask)

2> Would you like a chocolate? (The only good thing the Brits left in Ireland apart from the English
language was inculcating their love of candy)

3> The third question will change over time.  These days, it'll probably be something like "So, do the
Teabaggers really think Obama was born in Kenya?" or "Jaysus, why don't you just vote all those fockers
in Congress into the bin?"
 
2014-02-06 05:00:46 PM  

ThrobblefootSpectre: JayCab: Valiente: Cycle from Orlando to Daytona Beach. It looks like Ghana after a windstorm, except with more Baptist churches.

Oh, crap. The wife and I are doing Disney World in May, driving down from Virginia with a friend. Our route takes us straight from Daytona to Orlando.  Are you saying that I should probably make sure we can do that run without having to get off of the Interstate for gas?

If you are afraid of trees, and small 700 sq ft homes in quiet family neighborhoods, occupied by diverse normal non-1% families, then yes.


Heh, alright, I apparently took "looks like Ghana" in the completely wrong manner.

/All I really know about Ghana is that their soccer team keeps beating the USMNT under increasingly spurious circumstances.
 
2014-02-06 05:46:49 PM  

DjangoStonereaver: ThrobblefootSpectre: DjangoStonereaver: Outside of agriculture, there
isn't much 'there' there, and in hindsight spending 6 weeks there at the age of 10 was just the thing I
needed to see how different things could be from the life we have here in the US and how blessed I was to
be living here.


Spending some extended time in most any nation outside north america is a good way to appreciate just how good we in north america have it.  Even in the western E.U.  I spent a summer in Denmark and Italy.  As you said, it very very pretty, much history, and many interesting things to see.  But as far as actually living there - good luck finding employment or better yet don't bother, good luck if you are a woman trying to speak in the presence of men, owning a car is not something you do, owning a house other then ancestral family home is definitely not something you ever do, multiple generations living in one small home is the way things are.  Just many things that would be considered "oppressive" or "limiting" or "poor" here are the norm in most places.  Sometimes it amazes me how constantly Americans biatch about being the wealthiest place on earth.

So, when did you meet my mother and talk to her about why she decided to emigrate to America?

I love Ireland dearly, as does she, but thanks to her clear eyed descriptions of what her life was like I have
no romanticized Hibernian Society green tinted lenses about the Ol' Sod.

Valiente: DjangoStonereaver:But while it may not be a tourist spot, Roscommon is a gorgeous place, and the people really can't do
enough for you when you're there, especially if you're family.  But, even then:  almost everyone over
there has someone here in the 'States, and you'll find a picture of JFK in almost every house.

You forgot "JFK and the current Pope".

I've cycled across and around it three times. It's safe to say I like it.

For the VERY progressive households (possibly with IRA sympathies), there are more than a few pics of
MLK.  Or ma ...


"Yer man, Obama, why doesn't he just..." prefix to most political conversations in Ireland, yes.
 
2014-02-06 09:00:19 PM  

JayCab: Valiente: Cycle from Orlando to Daytona Beach. It looks like Ghana after a windstorm, except with more Baptist churches.

Oh, crap. The wife and I are doing Disney World in May, driving down from Virginia with a friend. Our route takes us straight from Daytona to Orlando.  Are you saying that I should probably make sure we can do that run without having to get off of the Interstate for gas?


Yes, I was on a secondary road, and it looked like Song of the South had had prison sex with Delverance as directed by Edward Burtynsky: Zippity-don't-duh. I think the only thing that saved me from the hungry-looking swamp folk was my glittery Twilight-like pallor and the speed of my just-acquired Schwinn 10-speed. For miles all I saw were pariah dogs and half-collapsed shacks.
 
2014-02-06 09:03:54 PM  

ThrobblefootSpectre: Valiente: Cycle from Orlando to Daytona Beach. It looks like Ghana after a windstorm, except with more Baptist churches.

Yep, excellent example of typical north american.  "Oh noes! Not everything is landscaped, and maintained by crews, watered to green perfection! The houses aren't 5 room mcmansions!! How can I live in this squalor?  I am opressed!"

*sigh*


Actually, it was the contrast between the sort-of Tomorowland of the Disney complex and the shiatshacks 10 miles to the east that was jarring. I had the same reaction when I approached Atlanta from the north: like the set of a real-life Jetsons downtown, and just to the south, straight outta Compton. My people come from "council housing" in Britain: I'm used to genteel squalor. But dressed in rags, rain through the tin roof poverty? Within sight of splitback suburbia? Yeah, that was a new one for me.
 
2014-02-06 09:05:28 PM  
Thank you subby for adding one more reason on my "Big list of reasons, why I shouldn't go to Ireland" list.
 
2014-02-06 09:55:29 PM  
i.chzbgr.com
 
2014-02-06 09:59:46 PM  

Valiente: Yes, I was on a secondary road, and it looked like Song of the South had had prison sex with Delverance as directed by Edward Burtynsky: Zippity-don't-duh. I think the only thing that saved me from the hungry-looking swamp folk was my glittery Twilight-like pallor and the speed of my just-acquired Schwinn 10-speed. For miles all I saw were pariah dogs and half-collapsed shacks.


You realize of course anyone can go to google maps streetview and see you are somewhere midway between exaggerating in the ludicrous extreme to downright full of shiat, right?
 
2014-02-06 10:05:06 PM  

Valiente: But dressed in rags, rain through the tin roof poverty?


lol.  Okay, downright full of shiat it is then.
 
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