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(USA Today)   Subway to remove yoga mats, shoe rubber and synthetic leather from its bread   (usatoday.com) divider line 72
    More: Spiffy, Subway, matt, synthetic leather, breads  
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8089 clicks; posted to Main » on 05 Feb 2014 at 11:57 PM (29 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-02-05 08:30:01 PM
I bet they also use chlorinated salts in their bread -- which is essentially the same thing as bleach!

I will not rest until the whole world is Chemical Free!!
 
2014-02-05 09:40:15 PM
24.media.tumblr.com
 
2014-02-05 09:54:22 PM
Maybe they can leave it unsmooshed, too. Or is that just too much?
 
2014-02-05 10:00:39 PM
Water is also a chemical used in the manufacture of yoga mats.
 
2014-02-05 10:06:00 PM

revrendjim: Water is also a chemical used in the manufacture of yoga mats.


Good god!... Subway uses dihydrogen monoxide... al qaeda uses that too!. What... are they trying to kill us all???
 
2014-02-05 11:02:05 PM
Done in two.

Leaving Satisfied.
 
2014-02-05 11:19:11 PM
Yet another "ingredient" that is banned in most of the world, but the good old FDA says is fine for U.S. consumer. Rather, money convinced the FDA it is just "fine" here.
 
2014-02-06 12:02:06 AM
Dear Sandwich Artists...

LEARN HOW TO PUT CHEESE ON THE GOD DAMNED SANDWICHES.

/\ /\ /\ /\ = bad
/\ \/ /\ \/ = good
 
2014-02-06 12:04:03 AM
I hear they use yeast in their bread! A sub sandwich should come with a prescription for Monistat.
 
2014-02-06 12:04:54 AM

mediablitz: Yet another "ingredient" that is banned in most of the world, but the good old FDA says is fine for U.S. consumer. Rather, money convinced the FDA it is just "fine" here.


So we trust science over the fears if laypeople? What a shame.
 
2014-02-06 12:05:07 AM
I'm not really opposed to removing potentially-harmful chemicals from food, especially since the US is pretty lax when it comes to chemical regulation (our record on endocrine disruptors, for example, is not exactly stellar), but can we also do something to remove "influential alternative foodbloggers" from the internet?
 
2014-02-06 12:09:30 AM

Donnchadha: I bet they also use chlorinated salts in their bread -- which is essentially the same thing as bleach!


Uh, bleach is more like chlorinated lye.
 
2014-02-06 12:11:32 AM
FTA: "Fresh baked bread -- and the perception of better-for you offerings --is a major deal to Subway. It's one of the chain's central selling points ..."

This is a strange statement in light of the Subway commercial during the Superb Owl that showed them making a Frito-Pie Subway sandwich.  That seems like the opposite of a "better-for-you" offering.
 
2014-02-06 12:11:40 AM
Portion control. I used to get the chicken breast, the nice lady would put double chicken on it, to the point I'd lock up halfway through it.
 
2014-02-06 12:16:09 AM
Bread: Flour, water, oil (optional), salt, and yeast.
What the fark, Subway?
 
2014-02-06 12:18:52 AM

mediablitz: Yet another "ingredient" that is banned in most of the world, but the good old FDA says is fine for U.S. consumer. Rather, money convinced the FDA it is just "fine" here.


So, you obviously have evidence that clearly shows how this ingredient is a health risk to humans in the quantities in which it's found in Subway bread, right?
 
2014-02-06 12:20:38 AM
Yogimus: LEARN HOW TO PUT CHEESE ON THE GOD DAMNED SANDWICHES.

I'm currently smearing triple-cream brie on bread, so your post is beneath me.
 
2014-02-06 12:24:10 AM

demaL-demaL-yeH: Bread: Flour, water, oil (optional), salt, and yeast.
What the fark, Subway?


Shelf stability is usually the reason for all those unpronounceable ingredients.
 
2014-02-06 12:25:29 AM

demaL-demaL-yeH: Bread: Flour, water, oil (optional), salt, and yeast.
What the fark, Subway?


I could only imagine their bread contains at least twice that number of ingredients for whatever reason.
 
2014-02-06 12:25:59 AM

fusillade762: demaL-demaL-yeH: Bread: Flour, water, oil (optional), salt, and yeast.
What the fark, Subway?

Shelf stability is usually the reason for all those unpronounceable ingredients.


If they didn't bake their bread in the farking stores, you might have a point there.

/Used to have a bakery.
 
2014-02-06 12:27:47 AM

C18H27NO3: demaL-demaL-yeH: Bread: Flour, water, oil (optional), salt, and yeast.
What the fark, Subway?

I could only imagine their bread contains at least twice that number of ingredients for whatever reason.


In order to produce the amount of bread that they do on a daily basis, at the prices they charge, they use certain benign additives to ensure the quality of the bread is consistent across all restaurant locations.
 
2014-02-06 12:28:33 AM

demaL-demaL-yeH: fusillade762: demaL-demaL-yeH: Bread: Flour, water, oil (optional), salt, and yeast.
What the fark, Subway?

Shelf stability is usually the reason for all those unpronounceable ingredients.

If they didn't bake their bread in the farking stores, you might have a point there.

/Used to have a bakery.


The dough isn't made from scratch in the stores, it's frozen and shipped.
 
2014-02-06 12:32:07 AM
High fructose corn syrup.

/yum
 
2014-02-06 12:32:08 AM

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: demaL-demaL-yeH: fusillade762: demaL-demaL-yeH: Bread: Flour, water, oil (optional), salt, and yeast.
What the fark, Subway?

Shelf stability is usually the reason for all those unpronounceable ingredients.

If they didn't bake their bread in the farking stores, you might have a point there.

/Used to have a bakery.

The dough isn't made from scratch in the stores, it's frozen and shipped.


If it's made in a central location and shipped frozen, there's no need for the additives.
 
2014-02-06 12:39:37 AM
Pure diazenedicarboxamide is an inhalation hazard but added to wet dough it deacts to bisurea which is stable in the baking process and then rapidly converted to urea in the body which is in the blood anyways and excreted. So it seems pretty benign as far as these things go...but why add it in the first place? Is stretchy dough that important.
 
2014-02-06 12:41:58 AM
Flour and water are the main ingredients used to make Elmers glue, why would you want to eat anything that's used to make glue?
 
2014-02-06 12:42:55 AM

demaL-demaL-yeH: Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: demaL-demaL-yeH: fusillade762: demaL-demaL-yeH: Bread: Flour, water, oil (optional), salt, and yeast.
What the fark, Subway?

Shelf stability is usually the reason for all those unpronounceable ingredients.

If they didn't bake their bread in the farking stores, you might have a point there.

/Used to have a bakery.

The dough isn't made from scratch in the stores, it's frozen and shipped.

If it's made in a central location and shipped frozen, there's no need for the additives.


Oh ok. Maybe you should tell Subway, they seem to be wasting a lot of money on extra ingredients for no reason.
 
2014-02-06 12:44:18 AM

ReapTheChaos: Flour and water are the main ingredients used to make Elmers glue, why would you want to eat anything that's used to make glue?


do horses eat flour
 
2014-02-06 12:44:34 AM

Donnchadha: I bet they also use chlorinated salts in their bread -- which is essentially the same thing as bleach!

I will not rest until the whole world is Chemical Free!!


revrendjim: Water is also a chemical used in the manufacture of yoga mats.


zamboni: revrendjim: Water is also a chemical used in the manufacture of yoga mats.

Good god!... Subway uses dihydrogen monoxide... al qaeda uses that too!. What... are they trying to kill us all???



images.sodahead.com
 
2014-02-06 12:47:09 AM

berylman: Pure diazenedicarboxamide is an inhalation hazard but added to wet dough it deacts to bisurea which is stable in the baking process and then rapidly converted to urea in the body which is in the blood anyways and excreted. So it seems pretty benign as far as these things go...but why add it in the first place? Is stretchy dough that important.


Yes, it is.
But using higher gluten flour CAN'T be more expensive than adding the waste stream of Dow to the dough.
 
2014-02-06 12:49:39 AM

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: demaL-demaL-yeH: Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: demaL-demaL-yeH: fusillade762: demaL-demaL-yeH: Bread: Flour, water, oil (optional), salt, and yeast.
What the fark, Subway?

Shelf stability is usually the reason for all those unpronounceable ingredients.

If they didn't bake their bread in the farking stores, you might have a point there.

/Used to have a bakery.

The dough isn't made from scratch in the stores, it's frozen and shipped.

If it's made in a central location and shipped frozen, there's no need for the additives.

Oh ok. Maybe you should tell Subway, they seem to be wasting a lot of money on extra ingredients for no reason.


Oh, I'm sure it's a fairly standard industrial mix.
Read the ingredients on a cake box.
/Makes cake from scratch.
//Bakes own bread, too.
 
2014-02-06 12:55:45 AM

ReapTheChaos: Flour and water are the main ingredients used to make Elmers glue, why would you want to eat anything that's used to make glue?


What? Elmer's is a PVA emulsion.
 
2014-02-06 12:59:06 AM
Is the flat bread still good? Is it even bread?
 
2014-02-06 01:00:11 AM

tarheel07: Is the flat bread still good? Is it even bread?


If it isn't, what the heck is unleavened bread then.
 
2014-02-06 01:04:26 AM

cwolf20: tarheel07: Is the flat bread still good? Is it even bread?

If it isn't, what the heck is unleavened bread then.


Matzah.
There are many kinds of flatbreads - lavosh, tortillas, naan, focaccia, pita, torta, pizza, frybread, many of which are leavened.
 
2014-02-06 01:07:02 AM
Naan contains yeast
 
2014-02-06 01:38:04 AM

Donnchadha: I bet they also use . .. salts in their bread


Salts? You mean the chemical they use to de-ice roads? OMG!
 
2014-02-06 02:09:34 AM

demaL-demaL-yeH: berylman: Pure diazenedicarboxamide is an inhalation hazard but added to wet dough it deacts to bisurea which is stable in the baking process and then rapidly converted to urea in the body which is in the blood anyways and excreted. So it seems pretty benign as far as these things go...but why add it in the first place? Is stretchy dough that important.

Yes, it is.
But using higher gluten flour CAN'T be more expensive than adding the waste stream of Dow to the dough.


It could be a supply issue. Not being able to get consistent, massive quantities of hard wheat flour (or adding extra gluten). They are quite a big chain after all.

/I'm still putting money on shelf stability though
 
2014-02-06 02:20:18 AM

demaL-demaL-yeH: Bread: Flour, water, oil (optional), salt, and yeast.
What the fark, Subway?


Making bread that way is likely too expensive, as it wouldn't rise enough and be springy enough for sandwiches made in most place while keeping with the uniform look. It actually seems incredibly common for most bread producers to use random chemicals like this, as is easy to see just by googling bread ingredient labels, azodiacarbonamide seems in most of the bread. As well there's the random bit of corn syrup and other assorted chemicals used due to the bread normally having been put into some high temperature containers to help with the rising process, which oxidizes the carotenoids which means much of the natural flavor from the flour is gone, leaving only really the flavor of those random chemicals.

img.fark.net
 
2014-02-06 02:41:04 AM
I never liked Subway's bread.

always tasted like a chemistry set.

/preferred Quizno's
//and now they're gone *sniff*
 
2014-02-06 02:44:24 AM

Demiglace: demaL-demaL-yeH: Bread: Flour, water, oil (optional), salt, and yeast.
What the fark, Subway?

Making bread that way is likely too expensive, as it wouldn't rise enough and be springy enough for sandwiches made in most place while keeping with the uniform look. It actually seems incredibly common for most bread producers to use random chemicals like this, as is easy to see just by googling bread ingredient labels, azodiacarbonamide seems in most of the bread. As well there's the random bit of corn syrup and other assorted chemicals used due to the bread normally having been put into some high temperature containers to help with the rising process, which oxidizes the carotenoids which means much of the natural flavor from the flour is gone, leaving only really the flavor of those random chemicals.

[img.fark.net image 640x506]


Do you even bake bread?
Besides, which would you rather eat?
 
2014-02-06 02:55:47 AM

berylman: Pure diazenedicarboxamide is an inhalation hazard ...


So is dihydrogen monoxide; it's fatal within minutes when inhaled.
 
2014-02-06 03:29:13 AM

demaL-demaL-yeH: Do you even bake bread?
Besides, which would you rather eat?


I missed the law which was requiring you to eat bread from Subway.

If there really was some demand for "chemical free" foods, they would sell it in stores, and you tards could choose to buy your products, and the rest of us can buy ours.
 
2014-02-06 04:07:13 AM
What's it matter what else azodiacarbonamide is used in providing it is safe to consume and has a benefit to the food to contain it?

Anyway, Subway's problems run far deeper than some obscure food additive.
 
2014-02-06 04:10:53 AM
But I like my bread chewy! Well, there goes that.
 
2014-02-06 04:19:52 AM
That's all well and good, but someone want to explain to me why the hell Walmart Subways smell the way they do? Seriously, there's that much room in the building but the smell can't just ventilate out of it. Makes zero sense to me.
 
2014-02-06 04:25:42 AM

Likwit: mediablitz: Yet another "ingredient" that is banned in most of the world, but the good old FDA says is fine for U.S. consumer. Rather, money convinced the FDA it is just "fine" here.

So we trust science over the fears if laypeople? What a shame.


FDA is not science. FDA is government.
It's a government agency advised by scientific studies, economic concerns, and more.
Are you suggesting that other world bodies base their regulations solely on the fears of laypeople?
 
2014-02-06 04:39:31 AM

TheWhoppah: Donnchadha: I bet they also use chlorinated salts in their bread -- which is essentially the same thing as bleach!

Uh, bleach is more like chlorinated lye.


Yup. Sodium chloride= table salt sodium hypochlorite=chlorine bleach
 
2014-02-06 05:10:57 AM
OK, fine, whatever. Just don't fark with the herb & cheese bread or red wine vinegar. I don't care much what's actually on the sandwich as long as it has those two things. (Well, except maybe the cold cuts, which wreak havoc with my guts.)
 
2014-02-06 06:13:10 AM

Demiglace: demaL-demaL-yeH: Bread: Flour, water, oil (optional), salt, and yeast.
What the fark, Subway?

Making bread that way is likely too expensive, as it wouldn't rise enough and be springy enough for sandwiches made in most place while keeping with the uniform look. It actually seems incredibly common for most bread producers to use random chemicals like this, as is easy to see just by googling bread ingredient labels, azodiacarbonamide seems in most of the bread. As well there's the random bit of corn syrup and other assorted chemicals used due to the bread normally having been put into some high temperature containers to help with the rising process, which oxidizes the carotenoids which means much of the natural flavor from the flour is gone, leaving only really the flavor of those random chemicals.

[img.fark.net image 640x506]


"enzymes"

Way to be specific there, wonderbread.

/2 years biochemistry
 
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