If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Hartford Courant)   Geologists determine that the greatest extinction of life on Earth was aided and abetted by the burning of coal. Good thing we know better now   (courant.com) divider line 28
    More: Interesting, life, coal, geologists, extinctions, United States, United Nations Environment Programme, Industrial Revolutions, acid rain  
•       •       •

2164 clicks; posted to Geek » on 05 Feb 2014 at 8:31 PM (28 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



28 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-02-05 08:24:59 PM
Imagine a world where the element mercury, a potent neurotoxin, fell from sooty skies with a concentration well above current safety levels.

What the EPA considers desirable for human exposure has nothing to do with what is safe for creatures of the late Permian.
 
2014-02-05 08:35:38 PM

ZAZ: Imagine a world where the element mercury, a potent neurotoxin, fell from sooty skies with a concentration well above current safety levels.

What the EPA considers desirable for human exposure has nothing to do with what is safe for creatures of the late Permian.


I rub mercury all over my pterodactyl. She likes it.
 
2014-02-05 08:44:49 PM

ZAZ: Imagine a world where the element mercury, a potent neurotoxin, fell from sooty skies with a concentration well above current safety levels.

What the EPA considers desirable for human exposure has nothing to do with what is safe for creatures of the late Permian.


This message brought to you by the Chinese Ministry for Environmental Protection and Mining.
 
2014-02-05 08:45:29 PM
So we need to move away from coal because volcanic events burned subterainian coal deposits the size of Europe creating unimaginable pollution.
 
2014-02-05 08:46:19 PM

ZAZ: What the EPA considers desirable for human exposure has nothing to do with what is safe for creatures of the late Permian.


In middle school we played with mercury (as part of a class) in amounts that would cause a school evacuation today.
 
2014-02-05 08:48:56 PM
Son of a.....  I got taken.
 
2014-02-05 08:49:51 PM

Saiga410: So we need to move away from coal because volcanic events burned subterainian coal deposits the size of Europe creating unimaginable pollution.


www.optionated.com
 
2014-02-05 08:50:45 PM
Yes.
Because everyone knows that volcanoes are fueled by COAL.

/Jeebus mahoney, are people stupid.
 
2014-02-05 08:59:05 PM

mjbok: ZAZ: What the EPA considers desirable for human exposure has nothing to do with what is safe for creatures of the late Permian.

In middle school we played with mercury (as part of a class) in amounts that would cause a school evacuation today.


Yes but today schools get evacuated because someone bit a sandwich into a vaguely gun-like shape.
 
2014-02-05 09:10:19 PM

Gordon Bennett: mjbok: ZAZ: What the EPA considers desirable for human exposure has nothing to do with what is safe for creatures of the late Permian.

In middle school we played with mercury (as part of a class) in amounts that would cause a school evacuation today.

Yes but today schools get evacuated because someone bit a sandwich into a vaguely gun-like shape.


mysonhasaids.files.wordpress.com
 
2014-02-05 09:20:04 PM
Well that was a lot of over dramatic derp.
 
2014-02-05 09:31:57 PM
it was a bane beyond measure for nearly every living thing during the 2,519,410th century B.C.

I imagine it wasn't just coal that was a problem for humans 250 million years ago.

Also, this guy is a professor and he can't link to the study he just wrote a column about?  WTF?  Oh, you have to pay money to read it.

At the very least, here's a better article about it with less ooga-booga and more detail.  You will also note the use of the word "could" when referring to the study by the lead researcher, presumably because the researchers that published it weren't grinding this guy's axe.
 
2014-02-05 09:37:19 PM
Only the headline and the opening line of that article actually say "it was from coal". The rest of the article (and I suspect the source) suggest more that it was a case of the Siberian eruptions releasing gases with the same chemical composition as that created by large-scale coal burning.
 
2014-02-05 09:45:49 PM

JayCab: Only the headline and the opening line of that article actually say "it was from coal". The rest of the article (and I suspect the source) suggest more that it was a case of the Siberian eruptions releasing gases with the same chemical composition as that created by large-scale coal burning.


Read the link I posted. They needed coal to make the theory work, so they ran simulations that suggested it was possible a huge amount of coal was burnt.  It wasn't just gases, they needed a source for fly ash and the lava flows wouldn't have provided it on their own.
 
2014-02-05 09:50:33 PM
Great. Now whenever I complain about denialists linking to whole derpipedias of bogus bloviation, they'll have this nice, fresh turd from "the other side" to point back at.
 
2014-02-05 10:04:36 PM

Lsherm: JayCab: Only the headline and the opening line of that article actually say "it was from coal". The rest of the article (and I suspect the source) suggest more that it was a case of the Siberian eruptions releasing gases with the same chemical composition as that created by large-scale coal burning.

Read the link I posted. They needed coal to make the theory work, so they ran simulations that suggested it was possible a huge amount of coal was burnt.  It wasn't just gases, they needed a source for fly ash and the lava flows wouldn't have provided it on their own.


The theory may explain the fallout but fer farks sake the volcano went from the Urals to China and Tibet to the artic
 
2014-02-05 10:05:21 PM

MaxSupernova: Well that was a lot of over dramatic derp.


www.globoforce.com
 
2014-02-05 10:17:51 PM
Al Gore, sadly shakes his head, "I warned them, but, they wouldn't listen,,,,,wait.....when did this happen?  Well, I guess we're off the hook, this time.  But, some of those other extinctions, I'm looking at you Mr. McMansion!"
 
2014-02-05 10:30:43 PM

mjbok: ZAZ: What the EPA considers desirable for human exposure has nothing to do with what is safe for creatures of the late Permian.

In middle school we played with mercury (as part of a class) in amounts that would cause a school evacuation today.


Did that, too, and not as part of a class. Don't even mention the farking around with carbon tetrachloride.  I SAID DON'T MENTION IT!

/ They were much more innocent days, back then.  And goofier.
 
2014-02-05 10:31:26 PM

Saiga410: The theory may explain the fallout but fer farks sake the volcano went from the Urals to China and Tibet to the artic


Oh, the article was a pretty good example of herpa derpa doo, just from a geology professor.  Not only did it misrepresent the study as fact instead of a plausible theory borne out by a simulation, it shamelessly linked the study to burning coal in this day and age on a much, much lower scale than the study was suggesting happened 250 million years ago.

I'm not a climate change denier.  I'm not saying burning coal isn't one of the largest contributors towards modern climate change.  What I'm saying is that the professor's article was the equivalent of a five-year-old shoving a crayon drawing in your face and saying "LOOKIT!"  And he used some deliberate sleight of word to do it.  Note how he drops the bolded bombshell at the end of his histrionic description of the world after the sulfuric atmosphere killed everything:

 Imagine a world where the carbon dioxide pollution from that one-two punch of volcanic gas and combustion gas caused a rapid rise in temperature of at least 8 degrees centigrade. This exceeds by eight times what Earth has experienced since the Industrial Revolution, when the burning of fossil fuel began in earnest. It exceeds by a factor of four predictions for the peak warming to come later this century. Though this ancient warming came too late for the kill, it was abrupt enough to keep Earth's systems unstabilized.

Maybe he's trying to fit the very description of speaking out of both sides of your mouth, but he keeps it up:

The sequence is clear, based on recent investigations at Meishan, China, and precise dating by scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Strike one was acid rain. Strike two was toxic fallout. Strike three was extinction of an estimated 90 percent of all species. Though the presence of these three events and the warming that followed have long been known, getting them in the right order had to await the discovery of the right geological site.

He's trying to write an article about climate change, but the extinction he's referencing happened before the warming period began, and he knows this.  He's just hoping you won't notice he pointed it out.

It's a rare find, but this may well qualify as liberal professor herpderp.  At the very least it's a poorly written article by someone who should know better.
 
2014-02-05 10:35:25 PM

zimbomba63: / They were much more innocent days, back then.  And goofier.


My high school chemistry professor used to let us put pure Potassium in water during farking class.  And not a teeny sample, either.  These days we'd be charged with making a bomb.
 
2014-02-05 10:35:48 PM

zimbomba63: mjbok: ZAZ: What the EPA considers desirable for human exposure has nothing to do with what is safe for creatures of the late Permian.

In middle school we played with mercury (as part of a class) in amounts that would cause a school evacuation today.

Did that, too, and not as part of a class. Don't even mention the farking around with carbon tetrachloride.  I SAID DON'T MENTION IT!

/ They were much more innocent days, back then.  And goofier.


Well this explains a lot about the older generations.

Jesus Farking Christ, how do you all not have lymphoma or leukemia? The rampant brain damage and diabetes are obvious.
 
2014-02-06 04:17:31 AM
The greatest extinction event on Earth was caused by waste oxygen released into the air. It killed almost everything, but a few creatures evolved into monsters that could actually thrive in an oxygen-rich environment. Does this mean that atmospheric oxygen is OK now?
 
2014-02-06 06:58:12 AM

This About That: The greatest extinction event on Earth was caused by waste oxygen released into the air. It killed almost everything, but a few creatures evolved into monsters that could actually thrive in an oxygen-rich environment. Does this mean that atmospheric oxygen is OK now?


We should ban that pollutant...
 
2014-02-06 07:02:11 AM

Lsherm: Saiga410: The theory may explain the fallout but fer farks sake the volcano went from the Urals to China and Tibet to the artic

Oh, the article was a pretty good example of herpa derpa doo, just from a geology professor.  Not only did it misrepresent the study as fact instead of a plausible theory borne out by a simulation, it shamelessly linked the study to burning coal in this day and age on a much, much lower scale than the study was suggesting happened 250 million years ago.

I'm not a climate change denier.  I'm not saying burning coal isn't one of the largest contributors towards modern climate change.  What I'm saying is that the professor's article was the equivalent of a five-year-old shoving a crayon drawing in your face and saying "LOOKIT!"  And he used some deliberate sleight of word to do it.  Note how he drops the bolded bombshell at the end of his histrionic description of the world after the sulfuric atmosphere killed everything:

 Imagine a world where the carbon dioxide pollution from that one-two punch of volcanic gas and combustion gas caused a rapid rise in temperature of at least 8 degrees centigrade. This exceeds by eight times what Earth has experienced since the Industrial Revolution, when the burning of fossil fuel began in earnest. It exceeds by a factor of four predictions for the peak warming to come later this century. Though this ancient warming came too late for the kill, it was abrupt enough to keep Earth's systems unstabilized.

Maybe he's trying to fit the very description of speaking out of both sides of your mouth, but he keeps it up:

The sequence is clear, based on recent investigations at Meishan, China, and precise dating by scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Strike one was acid rain. Strike two was toxic fallout. Strike three was extinction of an estimated 90 percent of all species. Though the presence of these three events and the warming that followed have long been known, getting them in the right o ...


It`s exactly this sort of hyperbole and fear mongering (TFA, not your post)  that gives ammunition to the other side. If the climate change movement wants to be taken seriously it has to stop with all this crap.
 
2014-02-06 08:24:42 AM
Not to mention the fracking concern put together by Atouk and Lar.
 
2014-02-06 08:31:42 AM

mjbok: ZAZ: What the EPA considers desirable for human exposure has nothing to do with what is safe for creatures of the late Permian.

In middle school we played with mercury (as part of a class) in amounts that would cause a school evacuation today.


Every time I got sick my mother would put a stick of mercury in my mouth...
 
2014-02-06 10:05:19 AM

This About That: The greatest extinction event on Earth was caused by waste oxygen released into the air. It killed almost everything, but a few creatures evolved into monsters that could actually thrive in an oxygen-rich environment. Does this mean that atmospheric oxygen is OK now?


Depends who you're asking -- the oxy-monsters themselves, or the few tattered remnants of the once-glorious anoxic biosphere who eke out a tortured existence in protected niches, staging the occasional uprising in an ill-perfused limb of one or another of their oppressors.
 
Displayed 28 of 28 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report