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(Chicago Sun-Times)   Employee at Whole Foods fired for calling off work because Chicago Public Schools called a snow day and she had to stay at home and take care of her special needs child. Shockingly, the uppity hipster outrage has yet to start   (suntimes.com) divider line 185
    More: Sick, CPS, whole foods, Rhiannon Broschat, River North, unexpected events, weather disasters, special needs, catastrophe theory  
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9105 clicks; posted to Main » on 05 Feb 2014 at 8:18 PM (23 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-02-05 08:55:38 PM
When you have kids, especially a special needs kid, you have a backup that can watch your kid and at least one more backup ready just in case.
 
2014-02-05 08:57:29 PM
Back in the late 80's, the company I worked for instituted a policy of "flexibility" for parents, in the name of supporting Working Families.  It quickly devolved into one massive excuse for parents to be absent at the drop of a hat and push all of their work off on the single and non-parent workers.  Within six months, there was a revolt by those of us being forced to pick up the slack as our 'family-minded' co-workers massively abused the system, and the whole thing was scrapped.

Yeah, sucks you have a kid who needs you.  But the terms of your job are not different because you're a parent.
 
2014-02-05 09:03:22 PM

ongbok: RyansPrivates: Cyclometh: BunkyBrewman: Those damn facts

Point of order- those are not  facts, they are assertions about the company's policy, and they specifically did  not comment on this woman's situation.

It is entirely possible that she was terminated for violating that policy, but there are no facts here, just what people are asserting to be true. It's also possible she was not in violation of the policy (although less likely in my opinion).

The question is, in my mind, why is this an unexcused absence if that was the case.  From the company's own statement of policy (relevant parts bolded):

...excused absences include illness (with a note from a medical provider), death in the family, jury duty, catastrophic events or city-wide weather disasters. Each team member is allowed up to five unexcused absences or 'points,' in a six-month period.

Why is this counted as an unexcused absence?

Because the state or the city didn't declare a state of emergency. Just because CPS calls a snow day doesn't mean it is a city wide weather disaster.

To tell you the truth, this sounds like she was somebody they wanted to get rid of for whatever reason, and her calling in put her to the point, per her employment contract with the company, that they could fire her.


Nah, in retail they just schedule you for so few hours that you quit.
 
2014-02-05 09:03:35 PM
Yeah, weather in Chicago has been horrible this year, and CPS has had two snow days.  But that doesn't mean it was a city-wide weather emergency, since everything was still open and public transit was still running normally.

Basically, it's pretty clear from their policy that she was making a habit of unexcused absences.  Can't say I blame her, since I've also been tempted to play hooky to avoid the trudge to work through the snow, but I also can't blame the company for replacing someone who leaves them understaffed with no warning once a month on average.  There's a line out the door of people looking for a job in the city who would be happy to show up when scheduled.  I don't believe for a minute, having worked retail, that other companies have been "more understanding" of calling in with no notice more than once or twice a year.

And she wants "back pay"...   how does that work?  Is she under the impression that she's salaried?

That said, hopefully she finds new work soon - perhaps with a better commute or a more flexible schedule.
 
2014-02-05 09:04:14 PM
And now  we know where the gender pay gap comes from.
 
2014-02-05 09:06:00 PM

FizixJunkee: gar1013: Where's the kid's father?

Maybe he couldn't get off work?


It mentioned she was a single mom, and no mention was made of attempting to see if the father could help out.
 
2014-02-05 09:07:01 PM

Nonrepeating Rotating Binary: Back in the late 80's, the company I worked for instituted a policy of "flexibility" for parents, in the name of supporting Working Families.  It quickly devolved into one massive excuse for parents to be absent at the drop of a hat and push all of their work off on the single and non-parent workers.  Within six months, there was a revolt by those of us being forced to pick up the slack as our 'family-minded' co-workers massively abused the system, and the whole thing was scrapped.

Yeah, sucks you have a kid who needs you.  But the terms of your job are not different because you're a parent.


It's really a shiatty situation, and this woman need help - but her employer isn't a charity or welfare agency - they can't deal with this, they sell groceries. By the way - where's daddy? Is she raising this child alone, and if so, why?
But if she can't really work and care for her child properly, she has to accept that and move forward.
 
2014-02-05 09:07:52 PM

jst3p: And now  we know where the gender pay gap comes from.


And you think that men in retail work don't call off/miss work enough to get fired?

Oh right, men are always responsible workers and never use the family excuse when they call off for a day.  You should let the men in my office know, if you can catch them before they leave early because they "have to get home to their kids."

/both genders are full of assholes
 
2014-02-05 09:08:07 PM
Anyone who's ever managed large groups of hourly service employees will tell you there's always at least one that will take every single opportunity to show up late, leave early, or just not come in.  Some have kids they use as constant excuses, others have perpetual "car trouble", and so forth.  These people ALWAYS leave everyone else in a tight spot and even if they apologize they still keep doing it.

Not saying this person in tfa is like that, but I understand if she was and they just got tired of it.  If she really was an MVP type of employee and normally reliable they probably wouldn't have canned her.
 
2014-02-05 09:08:56 PM

jst3p: Nah, in retail they just schedule you for so few hours that you quit.


During college, I worked at a coffee shop.  The guy who owned it would do just that when he wanted to get rid of an employee: cut their hours so ridiculously---e.g., from full-time 40 hours/week down to less than 5 hours/week---that they had no choice but to quit.

Bonus: He didn't have to pay unemployment!

/guess which political party he aligned himself with
 
2014-02-05 09:10:11 PM

Freudian_slipknot: jst3p: And now  we know where the gender pay gap comes from.

And you think that men in retail work don't call off/miss work enough to get fired?

Oh right, men are always responsible workers and never use the family excuse when they call off for a day.  You should let the men in my office know, if you can catch them before they leave early because they "have to get home to their kids."

/both genders are full of assholes


No, the men abandon their responsibilities completely and leave women to be single moms.
 
2014-02-05 09:11:22 PM

FizixJunkee: jst3p: Nah, in retail they just schedule you for so few hours that you quit.

During college, I worked at a coffee shop.  The guy who owned it would do just that when he wanted to get rid of an employee: cut their hours so ridiculously---e.g., from full-time 40 hours/week down to less than 5 hours/week---that they had no choice but to quit.

Bonus: He didn't have to pay unemployment!

/guess which political party he aligned himself with


I worked at Radio Shack for six years. The only person I ever saw fired was for theft. The rest went out just as you described.
 
2014-02-05 09:11:46 PM
"Excused absences include illness (with a note from a medical provider)"

God that shiat pisses me right the fark off.  If you're too sick to go to work for a day or two, stay the fark home and get better.  Goddamn doctors will tell you the same thing.

If I'm too sick to go to work, the very last thing I want to do is go out to some doctor's office, fill out paperwork, then sit around and wait forever with other sick people only to be told I should go home and get some rest.  I would much rather go to work and pass my illness on to the farking retards that implement such a policy.

Thank farking god I don't have to do that stupid shiat where I work.

/ Oh, and TFA is a non-story
 
2014-02-05 09:11:47 PM

lordjupiter: others have perpetual "car trouble", and so forth.


Did you pay them enough to buy a good-quality reliable car and keep it well-maintained?
 
2014-02-05 09:12:45 PM

jso2897: Nonrepeating Rotating Binary: Back in the late 80's, the company I worked for instituted a policy of "flexibility" for parents, in the name of supporting Working Families.  It quickly devolved into one massive excuse for parents to be absent at the drop of a hat and push all of their work off on the single and non-parent workers.  Within six months, there was a revolt by those of us being forced to pick up the slack as our 'family-minded' co-workers massively abused the system, and the whole thing was scrapped.

Yeah, sucks you have a kid who needs you.  But the terms of your job are not different because you're a parent.

It's really a shiatty situation, and this woman need help - but her employer isn't a charity or welfare agency - they can't deal with this, they sell groceries. By the way - where's daddy? Is she raising this child alone, and if so, why?
But if she can't really work and care for her child properly, she has to accept that and move forward.


To expand on the thought: Requiring special accommodations for single parents would discourage employers from retaining single parents as employees.
 
2014-02-05 09:13:23 PM

jst3p: Freudian_slipknot: jst3p: And now  we know where the gender pay gap comes from.

And you think that men in retail work don't call off/miss work enough to get fired?

Oh right, men are always responsible workers and never use the family excuse when they call off for a day.  You should let the men in my office know, if you can catch them before they leave early because they "have to get home to their kids."

/both genders are full of assholes

No, the men abandon their responsibilities completely and leave women to be single moms.


How's little Norman doing, Ms. Bates?
 
2014-02-05 09:13:34 PM

FizixJunkee: lordjupiter: others have perpetual "car trouble", and so forth.

Did you pay them enough to buy a good-quality reliable car and keep it well-maintained?


Actually, yes.

Why do you think "car trouble" was in quotes, Mr. Nader?
 
2014-02-05 09:15:46 PM

FizixJunkee: jst3p: Nah, in retail they just schedule you for so few hours that you quit.

During college, I worked at a coffee shop.  The guy who owned it would do just that when he wanted to get rid of an employee: cut their hours so ridiculously---e.g., from full-time 40 hours/week down to less than 5 hours/week---that they had no choice but to quit.

Bonus: He didn't have to pay unemployment!

/guess which political party he aligned himself with


Whole Foods is unionized, so they probably have provisions against that.
 
2014-02-05 09:18:03 PM

JSam21: No... most places, one event can be up to 5 days without a doctor's note.


Yeah, exactly.  The Whole Food's policy sounds a lot like Walmart's - you can get up to five absences in a rolling six month period, the sixth one will result in termination.  But under Walmart's policy, three consecutive days counts as a single absence, so if, for example, you have the flu for a couple of days, it's only going to count against you once.  I'd be surprised if Whole Foods didn't have a similar setup.  And they don't just spring it on you - at Walmart, you get a "personal discussion" at three absences, you're officially disciplined at four and then again at five.  If you're in attendance trouble, you already know you're in trouble well before you get fired for it.  Most companies are pretty hardcore about documenting those conversations; I'd be surprised if Whole Foods isn't.

Here's another possibility - maybe she's one of those people who's late all the time.  That's another quirk to the Walmart policy.  Three unexcused "incomplete shifts" (arriving more than fifteen minutes late or leaving more than ten minutes early) count as one absence.  Given that Whole Foods has a "points" system, I would guess you can accumulate points in a similar way.  In my experience, the people who are most surprised to get in trouble for attendance violations are the ones who never miss work, but habitually show up late.

I've been a single mom to a special needs child for whom day care was not always a viable option.  It sucks.  I have sympathy for anyone in that situation; I don't think most people even realize how shiatty it is when your child care options are that limited.  I've also never been in attendance trouble at work.  Her sixth absence may have been for a legit reason, but I'd bet anything she was abusing the policy at some point before that.
 
2014-02-05 09:21:50 PM

Revek: Gecko Gingrich: "Everyone has personal reasons or unexpected events that occasionally cause us to be late or miss work; recognizing this, our attendance policy in the Midwest region of Whole Foods Market is designed to provide support for our team members when these things happen. This includes a combination of excused and unexcused absences to provide the most flexibility," Phelps said in a statement. "Excused absences include illness (with a note from a medical provider), death in the family, jury duty, catastrophic events or city-wide weather disasters. Each team member is allowed up to five unexcused absences or 'points,' in a six-month period. No singular attendance event would cause a team member to be separated, and excused absences are not included in the 'points' system. Team members approaching their limit of unexcused absences receive warnings and reminders, and those who exceed their limit are separated."

read: this was not her fist time...or second time...or third...fourth...well, let's just say she has a habit of calling out

Yeah because she has a kid who needs to be taken care of and probably not one daycare that will.  I always imagine someone like you at 80 alone and just wishing someone cared enough to end your life because your to much of a coward to do it yourself.


Roe V Wade. She made a choice.
 
2014-02-05 09:22:35 PM

Atomic Spunk: fusillade762: I'd also like to know why "special needs" is in quotation marks.

Because the author doesn't really believe that the child is retarded.
[youshouldwriteaboutthat.files.wordpress.com image 480x360]


Green quarter?
 
2014-02-05 09:25:45 PM

jso2897: Nonrepeating Rotating Binary: Back in the late 80's, the company I worked for instituted a policy of "flexibility" for parents, in the name of supporting Working Families.  It quickly devolved into one massive excuse for parents to be absent at the drop of a hat and push all of their work off on the single and non-parent workers.  Within six months, there was a revolt by those of us being forced to pick up the slack as our 'family-minded' co-workers massively abused the system, and the whole thing was scrapped.

Yeah, sucks you have a kid who needs you.  But the terms of your job are not different because you're a parent.

It's really a shiatty situation, and this woman need help - but her employer isn't a charity or welfare agency - they can't deal with this, they sell groceries. By the way - where's daddy? Is she raising this child alone, and if so, why?
But if she can't really work and care for her child properly, she has to accept that and move forward.


Horseshiat.

We have high unemployment. Plenty of folks would take a part time average 20 hours jpb and accept being called in on her family days.

Where is daddy? Probably has a job too. But way to play the welfare stereotype...
 
2014-02-05 09:27:30 PM

Paintbox: Roe V Wade. She made a choice.


What if the father of the kid didn't want her to get an abortion?
 
2014-02-05 09:29:02 PM
You were fired for absence. Not just the last one you're talking about though. All of them. Lets go through and talk about all of them honey.
 
2014-02-05 09:32:27 PM
The Whole Foods in my area has beer tasting every Monday and wine tastings every Friday. Comes with a little plate of food that the employee serving the drink had made earlier that day. All of them seem very happy with their job and are some of the friendliest workers at any place I've ever seen. Plus it's only $5. If you have to leave work or take too many days off you have a child care problem. It's not the job of the business to take care of your kids.
 
2014-02-05 09:35:37 PM

fusillade762: gopher321: Gecko Gingrich: "Everyone has personal reasons or unexpected events that occasionally cause us to be late or miss work; recognizing this, our attendance policy in the Midwest region of Whole Foods Market is designed to provide support for our team members when these things happen. This includes a combination of excused and unexcused absences to provide the most flexibility," Phelps said in a statement. "Excused absences include illness (with a note from a medical provider), death in the family, jury duty, catastrophic events or city-wide weather disasters. Each team member is allowed up to five unexcused absences or 'points,' in a six-month period. No singular attendance event would cause a team member to be separated, and excused absences are not included in the 'points' system. Team members approaching their limit of unexcused absences receive warnings and reminders, and those who exceed their limit are separated."

read: this was not her fist time...or second time...or third...fourth...well, let's just say she has a habit of calling out

THIS

/non story

Seconded. I'd also like to know why "special needs" is in quotation marks.


He has gluten allergy and is piqued by Judge Wapner?
 
2014-02-05 09:36:53 PM

lordjupiter: Anyone who's ever managed large groups of hourly service employees will tell you there's always at least one that will take every single opportunity to show up late, leave early, or just not come in.  Some have kids they use as constant excuses, others have perpetual "car trouble", and so forth.  These people ALWAYS leave everyone else in a tight spot and even if they apologize they still keep doing it.


Used to work at a place where you didn't get any points until you were 10 minutes late.  Had a co-worker who was 5-9 minutes late every farking day.  Always some kind of excuse.  Alley was blocked, accident on the freeway, power went out, etc.  As I told him; "You're 5-9 minutes late every day.  Every Day.  That means you're making a choice not to be here on time.  Your excuses are bullshiat, and you need to set your alarm 15 minutes earlier."  Of course, about every 1-2 weeks something would happen to make him more than 10 minutes late and he accumulated points right up to a final notice, at which time he tried to play the "No one ever told me I could be fired for this!" card.  It didn't work.  Then he started to play the FLMA card, for vague 'medical issues', and being out for days and weeks at a time.  He still farked that up to the point of being fired.  (Even FLMA has it's limits)

In the mean time, I had moved on to a much better job.  He wanted in and I wouldn't give him a reference, but he managed to get an interview anyway.  He told them in the interview that he had been fired for absenteeism.  From pretty much every job he'd ever had.

Then was shocked!  SHOCKED I TELL YOU! That they straight up told him they weren't interested.

www.fybertech.com
 
2014-02-05 09:38:51 PM
You mean " asswhole foods"  amirite?
 
2014-02-05 09:41:34 PM

RyansPrivates: Cyclometh: BunkyBrewman: Those damn facts

Point of order- those are not  facts, they are assertions about the company's policy, and they specifically did  not comment on this woman's situation.

It is entirely possible that she was terminated for violating that policy, but there are no facts here, just what people are asserting to be true. It's also possible she was not in violation of the policy (although less likely in my opinion).

The question is, in my mind, why is this an unexcused absence if that was the case.  From the company's own statement of policy (relevant parts bolded):

...excused absences include illness (with a note from a medical provider), death in the family, jury duty, catastrophic events or city-wide weather disasters. Each team member is allowed up to five unexcused absences or 'points,' in a six-month period.

Why is this counted as an unexcused absence?


Was the city closed? Did the city declare all streets/roads closed? That is a city-wide emergency.
 
2014-02-05 09:42:39 PM
This thread...

It's like every sexless  Aspergerkid that ever put a gun on his screen saver at my job, and tried to talk about women during lunch....


/comedy gold
 
2014-02-05 09:43:10 PM

Nonrepeating Rotating Binary: Back in the late 80's, the company I worked for instituted a policy of "flexibility" for parents, in the name of supporting Working Families.  It quickly devolved into one massive excuse for parents to be absent at the drop of a hat and push all of their work off on the single and non-parent workers.  Within six months, there was a revolt by those of us being forced to pick up the slack as our 'family-minded' co-workers massively abused the system, and the whole thing was scrapped.

Yeah, sucks you have a kid who needs you.  But the terms of your job are not different because you're a parent.


The single people are worse than the parents at my job. Every Monday, half of them are gone. One has called in crazy and been out on FMLA four out of five days for the last three weeks. Another one is fat and lazy, and catches every germ that goes around.
My anecdote is superior to your anecdote.


/neener
 
2014-02-05 09:45:27 PM

FizixJunkee: Paintbox: Roe V Wade. She made a choice.

What if the father of the kid didn't want her to get an abortion?


I'm no legal guru, just a drunk, with a vasectomy.
However, I don't believe the "father" has any input as to whether she carries the child full term.
 
2014-02-05 09:48:41 PM
I'm never on the right side of these. Ever. I should feel compassion but I keep wondering about the other absences. Does she expect to get more unexcused absences than those women who don't have special needs children? or single people with their own set of things to do?
 
2014-02-05 09:51:37 PM

FizixJunkee: jst3p: Nah, in retail they just schedule you for so few hours that you quit.

During college, I worked at a coffee shop.  The guy who owned it would do just that when he wanted to get rid of an employee: cut their hours so ridiculously---e.g., from full-time 40 hours/week down to less than 5 hours/week---that they had no choice but to quit.

Bonus: He didn't have to pay unemployment!

/guess which political party he aligned himself with


That's pretty common practice in food & beverage and retail. Anyone who works in those fields knows when that happens, the writing is on the wall and to start looking for a new job. Maybe you prefer firing people outright with no warning? At least you give people a chance to quit rather than explaining why they were fired. Unless you catch them doing something awful like stealing or showing up drunk, of course.
 
2014-02-05 09:51:42 PM

jayphat: RyansPrivates: Cyclometh: BunkyBrewman: Those damn facts

Point of order- those are not  facts, they are assertions about the company's policy, and they specifically did  not comment on this woman's situation.

It is entirely possible that she was terminated for violating that policy, but there are no facts here, just what people are asserting to be true. It's also possible she was not in violation of the policy (although less likely in my opinion).

The question is, in my mind, why is this an unexcused absence if that was the case.  From the company's own statement of policy (relevant parts bolded):

...excused absences include illness (with a note from a medical provider), death in the family, jury duty, catastrophic events or city-wide weather disasters. Each team member is allowed up to five unexcused absences or 'points,' in a six-month period.

Why is this counted as an unexcused absence?

Was the city closed? Did the city declare all streets/roads closed? That is a city-wide emergency.


How about if a business doesn't want two-working-parent families in its employ, it pay enough that a single parent can be devoted to the job while a stay at home one covers all these things?

I'm not upset at whole foods: it does what every other business does. And maybe this person was a chronic user of leave and deserved the firing. No article is going to have that info.

But a two worker family not having on-call day care for snow days is something employers should expect.

We cheer the way employers screw employees, call for lower welfare, then biatch about poor people making decisions they have to make? That is complete shiat.
 
2014-02-05 09:51:48 PM

El Dudereno: Nonrepeating Rotating Binary: Back in the late 80's, the company I worked for instituted a policy of "flexibility" for parents, in the name of supporting Working Families.  It quickly devolved into one massive excuse for parents to be absent at the drop of a hat and push all of their work off on the single and non-parent workers.  Within six months, there was a revolt by those of us being forced to pick up the slack as our 'family-minded' co-workers massively abused the system, and the whole thing was scrapped.

Yeah, sucks you have a kid who needs you.  But the terms of your job are not different because you're a parent.

The single people are worse than the parents at my job. Every Monday, half of them are gone. One has called in crazy and been out on FMLA four out of five days for the last three weeks. Another one is fat and lazy, and catches every germ that goes around.
My anecdote is superior to your anecdote.


/neener


The 20-something single guy who everyone knows is a party boy...we know you don't have some 24 hour stomach bug or food poisoning.  We weren't born yesterday, dude.  Get well from the Beer Flu.
 
2014-02-05 09:52:44 PM

El Dudereno: Nonrepeating Rotating Binary: Back in the late 80's, the company I worked for instituted a policy of "flexibility" for parents, in the name of supporting Working Families.  It quickly devolved into one massive excuse for parents to be absent at the drop of a hat and push all of their work off on the single and non-parent workers.  Within six months, there was a revolt by those of us being forced to pick up the slack as our 'family-minded' co-workers massively abused the system, and the whole thing was scrapped.

Yeah, sucks you have a kid who needs you.  But the terms of your job are not different because you're a parent.

The single people are worse than the parents at my job. Every Monday, half of them are gone. One has called in crazy and been out on FMLA four out of five days for the last three weeks. Another one is fat and lazy, and catches every germ that goes around.
My anecdote is superior to your anecdote.


/neener


Childless person here and I've picked up the slack for many a parent in my department before.  Also the occasional lazy fellow childless coworker.

Luckily I am compensated accordingly with good raises every year and some fat bonuses while the rest of my coworkers biatch about how their little 2% raise didn't even cover the increased cost of their health bennies.
 
2014-02-05 09:55:38 PM

HotIgneous Intruder: "Unexcused absence" WTF.
What is this, high school?
Does she need a note from her mommy as well?


It may surprise you to learn that many adults working in retail are unreliable, and are the reason these policies exist.
 
2014-02-05 09:58:02 PM
What I'm taking away from this thread is my decision to never have kids was one of the best life choices I've ever made.
 
2014-02-05 10:03:40 PM

BigOle8point: jst3p: Freudian_slipknot: jst3p: And now  we know where the gender pay gap comes from.

And you think that men in retail work don't call off/miss work enough to get fired?

Oh right, men are always responsible workers and never use the family excuse when they call off for a day.  You should let the men in my office know, if you can catch them before they leave early because they "have to get home to their kids."

/both genders are full of assholes

No, the men abandon their responsibilities completely and leave women to be single moms.

How's little Norman doing, Ms. Bates?


Mother is fine. Just fine.
 
2014-02-05 10:04:40 PM

Nonrepeating Rotating Binary: lordjupiter: Anyone who's ever managed large groups of hourly service employees will tell you there's always at least one that will take every single opportunity to show up late, leave early, or just not come in.  Some have kids they use as constant excuses, others have perpetual "car trouble", and so forth.  These people ALWAYS leave everyone else in a tight spot and even if they apologize they still keep doing it.

Used to work at a place where you didn't get any points until you were 10 minutes late.  Had a co-worker who was 5-9 minutes late every farking day.  Always some kind of excuse.  Alley was blocked, accident on the freeway, power went out, etc.  As I told him; "You're 5-9 minutes late every day.  Every Day.  That means you're making a choice not to be here on time.  Your excuses are bullshiat, and you need to set your alarm 15 minutes earlier."  Of course, about every 1-2 weeks something would happen to make him more than 10 minutes late and he accumulated points right up to a final notice, at which time he tried to play the "No one ever told me I could be fired for this!" card.  It didn't work.  Then he started to play the FLMA card, for vague 'medical issues', and being out for days and weeks at a time.  He still farked that up to the point of being fired.  (Even FLMA has it's limits)

In the mean time, I had moved on to a much better job.  He wanted in and I wouldn't give him a reference, but he managed to get an interview anyway.  He told them in the interview that he had been fired for absenteeism.  From pretty much every job he'd ever had.

Then was shocked!  SHOCKED I TELL YOU! That they straight up told him they weren't interested.


Yeah our time clock software rounds up the last 7 minutes of the hour. I came across several people who clocked out at 4:53 every day just because "hey free 7 minutes". Seems like such a stupid risk to take when the reviewers see the actual time even though the payroll software counts 4:53 as 5:00
 
2014-02-05 10:05:54 PM

Nabb1: FizixJunkee: jst3p: Nah, in retail they just schedule you for so few hours that you quit.

During college, I worked at a coffee shop.  The guy who owned it would do just that when he wanted to get rid of an employee: cut their hours so ridiculously---e.g., from full-time 40 hours/week down to less than 5 hours/week---that they had no choice but to quit.

Bonus: He didn't have to pay unemployment!

/guess which political party he aligned himself with

That's pretty common practice in food & beverage and retail. Anyone who works in those fields knows when that happens, the writing is on the wall and to start looking for a new job. Maybe you prefer firing people outright with no warning? At least you give people a chance to quit rather than explaining why they were fired. Unless you catch them doing something awful like stealing or showing up drunk, of course.


I would rather be fired and get umemployment while finding another job.

My last restaurant job played all those games. I took a week off with months of advance notice and they cut my hours after, from 40 to 25ish. Which meant 35after I picked up shifts for the folks my boss shifted my hours to.

This occurred every year after 4th of july when my extended family all hits the lake. To add insult to injury, that was a bad week for business anyways. I mean like work open to close on the 4th and get 40 bucks slow.
 
2014-02-05 10:06:02 PM
Single moms do deserve *some* leniency but not to the point that it's a continuous burden to the company and the employees who have to cover for them. Your snowflake shouldn't be your employer's problem.
 
2014-02-05 10:10:48 PM
Illinois is full of prices. I don't know why, I had to leave.
 
2014-02-05 10:10:51 PM

moike: What I'm taking away from this thread is my decision to never have kids was one of the best life choices I've ever made.


Same here.
 
2014-02-05 10:12:00 PM

bigdog1960: Illinois is full of prices. I don't know why, I had to leave.


Pricks damn auto correct
 
2014-02-05 10:12:12 PM

baorao: Nonrepeating Rotating Binary: lordjupiter: Anyone who's ever managed large groups of hourly service employees will tell you there's always at least one that will take every single opportunity to show up late, leave early, or just not come in.  Some have kids they use as constant excuses, others have perpetual "car trouble", and so forth.  These people ALWAYS leave everyone else in a tight spot and even if they apologize they still keep doing it.

Used to work at a place where you didn't get any points until you were 10 minutes late.  Had a co-worker who was 5-9 minutes late every farking day.  Always some kind of excuse.  Alley was blocked, accident on the freeway, power went out, etc.  As I told him; "You're 5-9 minutes late every day.  Every Day.  That means you're making a choice not to be here on time.  Your excuses are bullshiat, and you need to set your alarm 15 minutes earlier."  Of course, about every 1-2 weeks something would happen to make him more than 10 minutes late and he accumulated points right up to a final notice, at which time he tried to play the "No one ever told me I could be fired for this!" card.  It didn't work.  Then he started to play the FLMA card, for vague 'medical issues', and being out for days and weeks at a time.  He still farked that up to the point of being fired.  (Even FLMA has it's limits)

In the mean time, I had moved on to a much better job.  He wanted in and I wouldn't give him a reference, but he managed to get an interview anyway.  He told them in the interview that he had been fired for absenteeism.  From pretty much every job he'd ever had.

Then was shocked!  SHOCKED I TELL YOU! That they straight up told him they weren't interested.

Yeah our time clock software rounds up the last 7 minutes of the hour. I came across several people who clocked out at 4:53 every day just because "hey free 7 minutes". Seems like such a stupid risk to take when the reviewers see the actual time even though the payroll software counts 4:5 ...


This is more common than you might think.  I've seen guys doing that on both ends, and when you round to 15 minute blocks that adds up to a free half hour per day, which can really screw up your budget and put guys into overtime if you don't catch it.

The other option, of course, is to not consider the shift to have started or ended except at the SCHEDULED time, and punching the clock is no different than signing in or signing out to prove you were there.  For example you can punch at 7:55am to show you're "in" but your shift starts at 8am and that's when you're expected to begin work, and start getting paid.  This requires a lot of oversight and manual review/entry.

A timeclock is not a legal document or proof of work.  Especially if someone is punching for a friend (which also happens).
 
2014-02-05 10:15:43 PM

Smackledorfer: Nabb1: FizixJunkee: jst3p: Nah, in retail they just schedule you for so few hours that you quit.

During college, I worked at a coffee shop.  The guy who owned it would do just that when he wanted to get rid of an employee: cut their hours so ridiculously---e.g., from full-time 40 hours/week down to less than 5 hours/week---that they had no choice but to quit.

Bonus: He didn't have to pay unemployment!

/guess which political party he aligned himself with

That's pretty common practice in food & beverage and retail. Anyone who works in those fields knows when that happens, the writing is on the wall and to start looking for a new job. Maybe you prefer firing people outright with no warning? At least you give people a chance to quit rather than explaining why they were fired. Unless you catch them doing something awful like stealing or showing up drunk, of course.

I would rather be fired and get umemployment while finding another job.

My last restaurant job played all those games. I took a week off with months of advance notice and they cut my hours after, from 40 to 25ish. Which meant 35after I picked up shifts for the folks my boss shifted my hours to.

This occurred every year after 4th of july when my extended family all hits the lake. To add insult to injury, that was a bad week for business anyways. I mean like work open to close on the 4th and get 40 bucks slow.


If it really is a slow day and they didn't need the extra help then you're definitely just getting cut because someone's pissed they or their friends had to work the holiday when you didn't.  But on the flip side, some guys do this ever year for nearly every  holiday, and think they get "dibs" by putting in months early.  Newp.  All requests subject to review, holiday work was part of the job when you were hired, etc.  (not saying your job was like that, but many are).
 
2014-02-05 10:16:13 PM

AutumnWind: moike: What I'm taking away from this thread is my decision to never have kids was one of the best life choices I've ever made.

Same here.


They are a lot of fun if you can afford them. My girlfriend and I are both in pretty good tax brackets, we don't face problems like this.
 
2014-02-05 10:17:39 PM

Atomic Spunk: fusillade762: I'd also like to know why "special needs" is in quotation marks.

Because the author doesn't really believe that the child is retarded.
[youshouldwriteaboutthat.files.wordpress.com image 480x360]


Chicken pot, chicken pot, chicken pot pie?

/What are those, D-cups?
 
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