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(NASA)   Satellite imagery illustrates just how farked California is due to drought conditions   (earthobservatory.nasa.gov) divider line 145
    More: Scary, satellite imaging, western front, Cascade Range, snow pack, droughts  
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13427 clicks; posted to Main » on 05 Feb 2014 at 7:38 PM (37 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-02-05 06:22:43 PM  
Zoom in and check out Lake Shasta.  It is essentially empty, with no snow to refill it.  Fark.
 
2014-02-05 06:27:43 PM  
Damn.
 
2014-02-05 06:39:27 PM  
I expect that produce prices will be going through the roof shortly.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-02-05 06:43:10 PM  
 
2014-02-05 06:43:26 PM  

unyon: I expect that produce prices will be going through the roof shortly.


This.  The difference in snowpack catches the eye quicker, but the whole Central Valley looks like a desert.
 
2014-02-05 06:50:52 PM  
Well, that's horrifying.
 
2014-02-05 06:52:02 PM  
I honestly didn't notice the difference in snow cover at first, because it was just too severe so I thought it was clouds.
 
2014-02-05 07:20:53 PM  
Holy shiatballs
 
2014-02-05 07:25:10 PM  
It rained this weekend in SF. Not a lot though.
 
2014-02-05 07:28:13 PM  

DamnYankees: It rained this weekend in SF. Not a lot though.


True, there has been a storm roll through since this image was taken, but this time of year there is supposed to be a nearly constant line of storms.
 
2014-02-05 07:32:54 PM  
We're 3 months into the 5 month rainy season, and rain/snow has mostly be AWOL so far this year, other than the occasional sprinkle.
 
2014-02-05 07:35:31 PM  
Americans are farked, cause Cali grows a lot of food.
 
2014-02-05 07:41:06 PM  
An in the spring it will rain for 5 days straight and there will be massive landslides. CA can't catch a break.
 
2014-02-05 07:42:32 PM  
Wow, people are acting like it's strange to have a desert around San Francisco. Non-story.
 
2014-02-05 07:43:16 PM  
 Just remember. The people wrong on climate change are likely wrong on every single other important issue. Or should at least be assumed wrong until proven otherwise.
 
2014-02-05 07:44:24 PM  
Better call John Steinbeck.
 
2014-02-05 07:45:45 PM  

HypnozombieX: Just remember. The people wrong on climate change are likely wrong on every single other important issue. Or should at least be assumed wrong until proven otherwise.


Come now.

Each position should be evaluated on it's own merits and not the mental condition of the person advocating for them.
 
2014-02-05 07:46:10 PM  

meat0918: Americans are farked, cause Cali grows a lot of food.


More than half the nation's fruit, nuts, and vegetables come from here.
California is the nation's number one dairy state.
California's leading commodity is milk and cream. Grapes are second.
 Nationally, products exclusively grown (99% or more) in California include almonds, artichokes, dates, figs, kiwifruit, olives, persimmons, pistachios, prunes, raisins, clovers, and walnuts.
From 70 to 80% of all ripe olives are grown in California.
California is the nation's leading producer of strawberries, averaging 1.4 billion pounds of strawberries or 83% of the country's total fresh and frozen strawberry production.
California produces 25% of the nation's onions and 43% of the nation's green onions.
We currently produce more than 90 percent of the broccoli grown in the U.S
97 percent of plums, 95 percent of celery, 95 percent of garlic, 89 percent of cauliflower, 71 percent of spinach, and 69 percent of carrots
90% of plum tomatoes
Sources:
http://www.beachcalifornia.com/california-food-facts.html
http://westernfarmpress.com/tree-nuts/what-happens-if-us-loses-calif or nia-food-production
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tomato
 
2014-02-05 07:46:40 PM  

unyon: I expect that produce prices will be going through the roof shortly.


Yes and no. I would hope/expect that in emergency measures they'll be able to direct water usage somewhat. Not all agriculture in the valley is food. Cotton (yes, there's people who grow farking COTTON in this climate) should hopefully get diminished water before things like the orchards, and cotton literally consumes as much water as every one of the orchard crops combined.

I'd say the big one which you'll see a price spike in is almonds - CA produces 70% of the world's almonds.
 
2014-02-05 07:47:53 PM  

meat0918: Americans are farked, cause Cali grows a lot of food.


Eat locally and grow a garden.  Sucks to be you if you can't have a garden.  Dumbass city slickers
 
2014-02-05 07:48:07 PM  
It is not going to get better.  Bite the bullet and build some desalination plant NOW.

Yes, they are expensive and energy intensive, but you're smart... figure out how to do that WITHOUT fossil fuels.

Do not delay.  Do it now.
 
2014-02-05 07:50:53 PM  
Also, it's worth noting: the article is from the 23rd. Northern CA got its first storm of note of the season last week. It didn't drop much, mind you - around a quarter inch in the Sacramento area, I think some of the ski resorts around Tahoe were reporting ~8" of snow - but it's a hell of a lot more than anything we'd had this season prior to that, so the images are basically the worst it's been so far.

Weather reports are showing another small storm tomorrow, and something a bit more substantial this weekend. If that keeps up it'll be a bad year, but hopefully not catastrophic.
 
2014-02-05 07:51:37 PM  

Smeggy Smurf: meat0918: Americans are farked, cause Cali grows a lot of food.

Eat locally and grow a garden.  Sucks to be you if you can't have a garden.  Dumbass city slickers


I do both, and am a city slicker.

Too bad I'm in Oregon, which is also experiencing lower than average rainfall and snowpack.

So get off your high horse
 
2014-02-05 07:51:59 PM  
Its mostly desert.  What do they expect to happen.
 
2014-02-05 07:52:29 PM  
Clearly it's not working


euro-med.dk
 
2014-02-05 07:52:43 PM  
I blame Evergreen going out of business. Evergreen isn't able to fly its fleet of modified Supertankers dropping weather modification chemtrails around the state.

/I am so incredibly kidding.
//Former Zoner
///Screw DMS
 
2014-02-05 07:53:09 PM  

Revek: Its mostly desert.  What do they expect to happen.


You're right. It's totally normal for the Sierra Nevada mountains to be devoid of snow in the wintertime. They are a desert, after all.
 
2014-02-05 07:55:21 PM  

Weidermeijer: It is not going to get better.  Bite the bullet and build some desalination plant NOW.

Yes, they are expensive and energy intensive, but you're smart... figure out how to do that WITHOUT fossil fuels.

Do not delay.  Do it now.


Nuclear power. Conventional DDGs produce so much fresh water they dump it overboard. An SSN powerplant could produce enough for a city.
 
2014-02-05 07:56:24 PM  

Revek: Its mostly desert.  What do they expect to happen.


Yeah, it's really not. The southern end is considered desert grassland, but the rest of the valley is plain old grassland/prairie.

And hell, if we're talking in a "natural, before human intervention" sense, before the levees and dams, the central valley was mostly marshland.

http://cepsym.info/Sympro2012/leclerc_prnfmt.pdf
 
2014-02-05 07:58:24 PM  

vygramul: Weidermeijer: It is not going to get better.  Bite the bullet and build some desalination plant NOW.

Yes, they are expensive and energy intensive, but you're smart... figure out how to do that WITHOUT fossil fuels.

Do not delay.  Do it now.

Nuclear power. Conventional DDGs produce so much fresh water they dump it overboard. An SSN powerplant could produce enough for a city.


Urban users only consume about 10% of the water.  Most goes to agriculture.  Even if we converted every city to desalinated water, it wouldn't make much of a dent.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_in_California
 
2014-02-05 07:59:19 PM  

meat0918: HypnozombieX: Just remember. The people wrong on climate change are likely wrong on every single other important issue. Or should at least be assumed wrong until proven otherwise.

Come now.

Each position should be evaluated on it's own merits and not the mental condition of the person advocating for them.


To be so very wrong on such an important issue for motives that seem to be driven by "rational self interest" ideology would certainly make me want to re-evaluate the other positions taken by the person, group, etc in question. I mean, what else are they willing to sell their fellow humans out for in order to make a profit or gain political power? Granted it's not a given but It should certainly be a red flag.
 
2014-02-05 08:00:56 PM  

ShawnDoc: vygramul: Weidermeijer: It is not going to get better.  Bite the bullet and build some desalination plant NOW.

Yes, they are expensive and energy intensive, but you're smart... figure out how to do that WITHOUT fossil fuels.

Do not delay.  Do it now.

Nuclear power. Conventional DDGs produce so much fresh water they dump it overboard. An SSN powerplant could produce enough for a city.

Urban users only consume about 10% of the water.  Most goes to agriculture.  Even if we converted every city to desalinated water, it wouldn't make much of a dent.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_in_California


Yes, but I imagine land-based power plants are substantially more capable than an SSN.
 
2014-02-05 08:03:08 PM  

Smeggy Smurf: meat0918: Americans are farked, cause Cali grows a lot of food.

Eat locally and grow a garden.  Sucks to be you if you can't have a garden.  Dumbass city slickers


Oh look - the dog came in and shiat on the rug.
 
2014-02-05 08:04:29 PM  
There is very little water left in the reservoirs. They were saying we needed heavy rain every other day for the rest of the normal wet season to make it back to any reasonable water reserve. That isn't happening.

They are already cutting back on water allocations. It's going to be a pretty bad year for crops, which will also break CA financially.

This year is looking to be sort of a Waterworld except with dirt and sand. Kind of an Ishtar level disaster.
 
2014-02-05 08:06:39 PM  

Jragghen: Weather reports are showing another small storm tomorrow, and something a bit more substantial this weekend. If that keeps up it'll be a bad year, but hopefully not catastrophic


It's already catastrophic. The little bit we got the other day is a drop in a bucket. The next two storms aren't going to amount to much either in the grand scheme of things.

Fire season is going to suck.
 
2014-02-05 08:07:11 PM  
Man, Nevada's a barren wasteland.... sorry wrong takeaway. Man, Cali's in a world of hurt.
 
2014-02-05 08:08:47 PM  
If you drive along I-5 through "Middle California," you'll see a bunch of little signs bemoaning the "CONGRESS CREATED DUST BOWL" (sic).  I wonder if this imagery might sway those farmers' opinions.

/I doubt it.
//Go deep enough and you'll see full billboards cheering for Wisconsin Governor F*ckhead Scott Walker.
 
2014-02-05 08:09:49 PM  

Vitamin Pb: They are already cutting back on water allocations. It's going to be a pretty bad year for crops, which will also break CA financially.


Agriculture accounts for about 2% of California's GDP, give or take depending on the year.

That's not to downplay the misery that the state's agricultural sector will suffer this year as they receive basically nothing from the major water projects, but let's not overstate the economic importance of that sector, especially when it accounts for by far the biggest share of water consumption.
 
2014-02-05 08:12:30 PM  
I live in MN, and right now I have half a mind to start shoveling snow into trucks and sending it off to Cali (cali).

But, I know we're going to need that melt water to flow into the Mississip' and cause severe flooding this spring.

/I know, there's farms that need it down the way
//But seriously, we might could think about sparing some.
 
2014-02-05 08:12:30 PM  

Raging Whore Moans: If you drive along I-5 through "Middle California," you'll see a bunch of little signs bemoaning the "CONGRESS CREATED DUST BOWL" (sic).  I wonder if this imagery might sway those farmers' opinions.

/I doubt it.
//Go deep enough and you'll see full billboards cheering for Wisconsin Governor F*ckhead Scott Walker.


Boehner and his idiot cronies have already started flogging that "FISH OVER FARMERS HURRRR" business. I fully expect the "switch on the pumps" morans to filter into these threads once Hannity does his annual show from a fallow Monsanto field.
 
2014-02-05 08:13:27 PM  

Raging Whore Moans: If you drive along I-5 through "Middle California," you'll see a bunch of little signs bemoaning the "CONGRESS CREATED DUST BOWL" (sic). I wonder if this imagery might sway those farmers' opinions.

/I doubt it.
//Go deep enough and you'll see full billboards cheering for Wisconsin Governor F*ckhead Scott Walker.


Another problem we have is a lot of farmers are still irrigating using old technology.  Flood irrigation is still practiced and is enormously wasteful of water.  That's where they literally flood an orchard with several inches of standing water.  There are much more effective ways of irrigating those crops, but it requires investment by the farmer.  If the state was smart, they'd shift some of the money they spend subsidizing the price of water, and subsidize upgrading to drip and other methods of irrigation that save water.
 
2014-02-05 08:15:10 PM  

crotchgrabber: Jragghen: Weather reports are showing another small storm tomorrow, and something a bit more substantial this weekend. If that keeps up it'll be a bad year, but hopefully not catastrophic

It's already catastrophic. The little bit we got the other day is a drop in a bucket. The next two storms aren't going to amount to much either in the grand scheme of things.

Fire season is going to suck.


Well, by "keeps up" I meant more "rains like that for a solid month," but yeah.

Fire season is indeed going to suck.
 
2014-02-05 08:16:22 PM  

Smeggy Smurf: meat0918: Americans are farked, cause Cali grows a lot of food.

Eat locally and grow a garden.  Sucks to be you if you can't have a garden.  Dumbass city slickers


Absolute worst thing you can do. Large-scale cultivation is far more ecologically-friendly than everyone having their own little farm. It ain't 1314.
 
2014-02-05 08:20:23 PM  

Cagey B: Vitamin Pb: They are already cutting back on water allocations. It's going to be a pretty bad year for crops, which will also break CA financially.

Agriculture accounts for about 2% of California's GDP, give or take depending on the year.

That's not to downplay the misery that the state's agricultural sector will suffer this year as they receive basically nothing from the major water projects, but let's not overstate the economic importance of that sector, especially when it accounts for by far the biggest share of water consumption.


Um, that article says "According to the  , "California agriculture is nearly a $36.6 billion dollar industry that generates $100 billion in related economic activity."

That's $100B/$2000B economy. That's 5%, not 2%. You also forget the increased spending on welfare for people who won't be working. That's going add up to probably another 2% swing. So about 7% of the states income goes away. Also, another 5% is tourism. That will go down in a drought due to reduced outdoor activities.

The state budget can't sustain that kind of loss.
 
2014-02-05 08:21:31 PM  

Revek: Its mostly desert.  What do they expect to happen.


The Beatings Will Continue Until Morale Improves: Wow, people are acting like it's strange to have a desert around San Francisco. Non-story.



California is not a "desert," nor even "mostly desert." Do you think the nation's #1 food and agricultural producer is a desert? Southern California, even, is not classified as a "desert" until you get way inland past Los Angeles to the San Bernardino and Palm Springs areas. The first explorers who arrived here did not find a sea of sand and cacti spread across the Los Angeles basin. It's just a popular misconception that Californians are forcing modern cities into otherwise uninhabitable land. That would be Las Vegas and Phoenix that they're thinking of.

98% of California is at abnormally dry levels right now. We are in a "once in 50 years" level drought, and it could get even worse. Considering that we produce half of the country's fruit, nuts, and vegetables, I'd say it's anything but a "non-story."
 
2014-02-05 08:21:43 PM  
Absolutely wrong time for a big earthquake, the results of which would be total disruption of limited water supply to fight fires from broken gas mains and damaged industrial petro-refining equipment.

/Sorry, not trying to add to the gloom and doom, but I just finished reading this:

http://www.amazon.com/Dangerous-Place-Californias-Unsettling-Fate/dp/ 0 142003832

Also: http://www.salon.com/2003/03/05/reisner/ From the Salon review:

"In his final work, he links the prospect of the Big One hitting the Bay Area or L.A. to the staggering network of dams and levees that bring water hundreds of miles to California's sprawling urban centers (and also keep water from flooding the Central Valley's rich farmlands). When the plates of the earth shift, so does all that water, and that great sucking sound you heard is the echoing of this well-worn truth - nature abhors a vacuum.
In a 7.2 quake, Reisner fears not only for the thousands of lives likely to be lost in the collapse of bridges, unreinforced masonry buildings and cheaply built retail stores. He's worried about the state's whole way of life, which is balanced precariously on its improbable water supply. "If the contrived flow of water should somehow just stop, California's economy, which was worth about a trillion dollars as the new millennium dawned, would implode like a neutron star," he writes."
 
2014-02-05 08:22:15 PM  

Jragghen: crotchgrabber: Jragghen: Weather reports are showing another small storm tomorrow, and something a bit more substantial this weekend. If that keeps up it'll be a bad year, but hopefully not catastrophic

It's already catastrophic. The little bit we got the other day is a drop in a bucket. The next two storms aren't going to amount to much either in the grand scheme of things.

Fire season is going to suck.

Well, by "keeps up" I meant more "rains like that for a solid month," but yeah.

Fire season is indeed going to suck.


Nah, fire season is only going to last 2-3 days this year. After that, everything will be ash and won't burn any more.
 
2014-02-05 08:22:25 PM  
If only there was a way to get fresh water from the ocean.
 
2014-02-05 08:25:47 PM  

Deep Contact: If only there was a way to get fresh water from the ocean.


Sure you can run desalination plants. But you need a way to move large quantities of that water inland over and into mountains. There aren't pumps pointing in the right direction so you would have to do 10 years of ecological impact studies and 20 years of NIMBY to start construction of the piping systems you would need.
 
2014-02-05 08:26:29 PM  

Top Geezer: Absolutely wrong time for a big earthquake, the results of which would be total disruption of limited water supply to fight fires from broken gas mains and damaged industrial petro-refining equipment.

/Sorry, not trying to add to the gloom and doom, but I just finished reading this:

http://www.amazon.com/Dangerous-Place-Californias-Unsettling-Fate/dp/ 0 142003832

Also: http://www.salon.com/2003/03/05/reisner/ From the Salon review:

"In his final work, he links the prospect of the Big One hitting the Bay Area or L.A. to the staggering network of dams and levees that bring water hundreds of miles to California's sprawling urban centers (and also keep water from flooding the Central Valley's rich farmlands). When the plates of the earth shift, so does all that water, and that great sucking sound you heard is the echoing of this well-worn truth - nature abhors a vacuum.
In a 7.2 quake, Reisner fears not only for the thousands of lives likely to be lost in the collapse of bridges, unreinforced masonry buildings and cheaply built retail stores. He's worried about the state's whole way of life, which is balanced precariously on its improbable water supply. "If the contrived flow of water should somehow just stop, California's economy, which was worth about a trillion dollars as the new millennium dawned, would implode like a neutron star," he writes."


Isn't this true for any highly urbanized area? Every urban area is completely dependent on importing food and water.
 
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