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(YouTube) Video Indian activist: What happens to "cloud" computing when it rains? Huh? Did you think of that, Google geniuses? (Skip to 2:08-2:46, although the whole interview is comedy gold.)   (youtube.com) divider line 16
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5780 clicks; posted to Video » on 05 Feb 2014 at 9:22 AM (29 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
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2014-02-05 10:01:49 AM
2 votes:

Richard C Stanford: Which kind of Indian? Red dot or whoo-whoo?


Call center, not casino.
2014-02-05 09:43:18 AM
2 votes:
It's the same thing that happens if one of the innertubes gets a flat.
2014-02-05 03:50:56 PM
1 votes:

fluffy2097: What happens to all your data on a cloud service should they go out of business, or are seized by the FBI or MPAA/RIAA?


People seem to be misunderstanding the concept of the "cloud" with big internet services.

The whole point behind the cloud is that your data is everywhere, accessible from anything, like the domain name lists that sites trade daily. Like a viral image, you can't get rid of something in the cloud. If a server goes down, there are backups upon backups on other servers, and they're all interchangeable. And all of that data still safe, secure, and privvy only to you. That is the true vision of the cloud.

Right now, as it stands, the cloud is just a theoretical framework. It doesn't truly exist in this state. What we have instead are big, monolithic entities offering "all eggs in one basket" services, which is the exact antithesis of what the Cloud is supposed to be. Because if they go down or they decide to cut you off or terminate business relations with you, you're farked. Because your data isn't anywhere else.

The Cloud is all about free people, free data and free information. We might not ever get to the radical concept of The Cloud, because corporations are carving out Internet niches like feudal fiefdoms and shutting each other out. That's technically not what the Cloud is.

So I try to interact with these companies and keep all my data local and offline as much as possible. Yes, even email (run my own mailserve). That's the only way to know someone won't arbitrarily take my stuff away from me.
2014-02-05 03:21:30 PM
1 votes:

Iplaybass: WTF is with the head bobbing from interviewer?


Outsourced was totally underrated.
2014-02-05 03:00:04 PM
1 votes:

balki1867: There needs to be some sort of debate set up between this guy and Senator Ted Stevens.

(For the uninitiated,  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6aFmib9NUoY )


That would truly be an impressive debate, since Ted died in a plane crash 3 1/2 years ago.
2014-02-05 02:04:49 PM
1 votes:
It's like watching a teabagger try to talk about the economy.
2014-02-05 01:27:06 PM
1 votes:

peasandcarrots: You can't really recover from that kind of eggs-in-a-basket thing. Fifty years from now there will be corporate CEOs in the entertainment and media business who will mistrust cloud computing because of "how they got burned back in 2013 when I was an intern."

When it rains, it pours, I guess...


IT technologies are just a pendulum.

The first systems were "Cloud" computing. You had a big set of centralized servers and storage and everyone accessed them remotely through relatively dumb devices.

This we deemed "bad", so we all moved to smart endpoints with local storage and computing.
This we deemed "bad" so we all moved to dumber endpoints with remote storage computing.

Lather, rinse, repeat.

If "Cloud" crashes and burns, it'll be back under a new name.
2014-02-05 01:05:20 PM
1 votes:

Vaneshi: fluffy2097: If you keep it metaphorical, it's a good question, ones we've already seen played out.

Indeed and I'm afraid it'll continue to play out over and over again as people fall for "To The Cloud: it can do EVERYTHING!" just like they fell for "Web2.0: It'll make you an Internet Hero!" in their droves.

I'm not saying the cloud doesn't have its uses, I use Dropbox for shunting files between my machines and syncing save games and sure, if I needed more MIPS right the hell now then it's brilliant.  But it isn't the panacea to all that ails your companies IT infrastructure.

All it takes to knock a data centre off-line is two idiots with an incorrect pipe map, JCB's at just the right locations and a faulty cutout.  Ask IBM, happened to them and USF2 in 07.  The cutout kept flipping between the battery packs (ohh this one is 99% flip, ohhh it's 98% and THIS one is 99% flip, etc.) and thus the generators never kicked in *poof* dead. 

/Suggested Johnson Controls cut the battery pack cables with a fire axe...
// Even the MD was for it just to get the bastard farm going again on the generators.
///Middle management, not so much.  Indecisive morons.


For a while, my company had a big boner for the Cloud, which isn't such a surprise for a media company - the idea of offsite storage and distribution (and canning the IT know-it-alls) sounded just delicious to them, so they spent millions on contracts with a system that was big in the industry for Cloud-computing.

This worked right up until the exact second that the data center for our entire network went kersplat due to the stupidity of the vendor. For a few days, a company whose job it was to circulate information was unable to circulate information except via the onsite remains of its decrepit backup system.

And, as furious as the suits were at this (expensive) development, we weren't the only media company using this vendor. HUNDREDS of media companies used the same firm to handle their offsite data. So sure, our company went off the idea of cloud computing overnight - but this one vendor might just have ruined the whole idea of cloud computing for an entire INDUSTRY.

You can't really recover from that kind of eggs-in-a-basket thing. Fifty years from now there will be corporate CEOs in the entertainment and media business who will mistrust cloud computing because of "how they got burned back in 2013 when I was an intern."

When it rains, it pours, I guess...
2014-02-05 11:09:55 AM
1 votes:
I never realized how much we rely on idioms...
www.slate.com
2014-02-05 10:54:10 AM
1 votes:
It still amuses me that India outsources their Visa services to a US company... I wanted so badly to call their tech support services just to hear some guy with a southern drawl say "Hi... This here is Ramesh... How may I help you?"
2014-02-05 10:51:48 AM
1 votes:
Recording conversations stored in the air? Somebody fell asleep watching Fringe, I think....

img2u.info

As for his Cloud arguments, reminds me of all the Steam haters.
2014-02-05 10:31:15 AM
1 votes:
Indian?

I thought that had been replaced by South Asian, and "Indian" was an old term that was now replaced by "First Nations".

At least here in Canada it has.
2014-02-05 10:23:21 AM
1 votes:
If you keep it metaphorical, it's a good question, ones we've already seen played out.

What happens to all your data on a cloud service should they go out of business, or are seized by the FBI or MPAA/RIAA?

What recompense do you have should your cloud service provider store all their data on RAID0, and didn't do backups?

What happens if a virus infiltrates their system and corrupts your data.

Password/personal information breaches.

All good questions. Asked by a person who doesn't have the language to articulate them.
2014-02-05 10:05:55 AM
1 votes:
Headline: Indian Man Yells at Cloud
2014-02-05 09:54:30 AM
1 votes:
Please do the needful
2014-02-05 09:43:39 AM
1 votes:
Wow, an Indian Alex Jones.
 
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