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(Extreme Tech)   Man, that's just cold   (extremetech.com) divider line 26
    More: Cool, International Space Station, Absolute Zero, universe, classical physics, gluons, boson, laser cools, quantum  
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4232 clicks; posted to Geek » on 05 Feb 2014 at 4:56 AM (37 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



26 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-02-05 02:07:07 AM  
I'm sure someone has an ex-wife joke to cover this scenario.
 
2014-02-05 03:20:30 AM  
Gotta love "we have no idea what's going to happen" physics experiments.
 
2014-02-05 05:15:32 AM  
Wasn't this in one of the Calahan's Crosstime Saloon as a cause of the end of the universe?
 
2014-02-05 05:52:22 AM  
Ok, that's very cool.   8)

Man, the tech used to do this...just awesome.


I'm waiting for the results...
 
2014-02-05 05:53:03 AM  

Triumph: Gotta love "we have no idea what's going to happen" physics experiments.


I should send this to the professor who was my thesis counsellor. I distinctly remember her disputing my claim about science by saying "Just doing something to see what happens isn't science". Maybe hearing that NASA (and a few million dollars) is on my side of the discussion will change her mind.
 
2014-02-05 05:58:50 AM  
This article is not helping me feel warmer at -13F tonight.

/took the trash out with no jacket or socks.
//I survived.
 
2014-02-05 06:02:41 AM  

Triumph: Gotta love "we have no idea what's going to happen" physics experiments.


It's almost at 'what's the worse that can happen' which is a few steps above the 'hold my beer and watch this' method of testing things
 
2014-02-05 06:48:29 AM  

DerAppie: Triumph: Gotta love "we have no idea what's going to happen" physics experiments.

I should send this to the professor who was my thesis counsellor. I distinctly remember her disputing my claim about science by saying "Just doing something to see what happens isn't science". Maybe hearing that NASA (and a few million dollars) is on my side of the discussion will change her mind.


Well, technically, she's correct. Science is analysis and observation. Provoking the event to analyze and observe is engineering, something which most scientists dabble in, these days. :)
 
2014-02-05 07:11:41 AM  

starsrift: DerAppie: Triumph: Gotta love "we have no idea what's going to happen" physics experiments.

I should send this to the professor who was my thesis counsellor. I distinctly remember her disputing my claim about science by saying "Just doing something to see what happens isn't science". Maybe hearing that NASA (and a few million dollars) is on my side of the discussion will change her mind.

Well, technically, she's correct. Science is analysis and observation. Provoking the event to analyze and observe is engineering, something which most scientists dabble in, these days. :)


Bah, splitting hairs. It is still analysis and observation if you cause the event. Scientists have done so since forever. Newton didn't sit around waiting for things to fall or start moving when trying to find his formulas describing motion. Madam Curie didn't wait for radioactive isotopes to spontaneously appear in a controlled setting. The formulas behind the field of fluid dynamics weren't discovered in a mountain stream. Ug the caveman certainly didn't look in the contemporary literature to see if it was worth the effort to investigate if he could actually warm his body with this "fire" thing he just found.

Besides, I was looking at random correlations in a data set for fun (Yeah, I know). Any discovery I could have made wouldn't be less valid because I didn't set out to find the connection before collecting the data, or because I didn't have the literature at hand to explain the connection. My view of science was more "Hmm, that's interesting" while her view was more "Yup, exactly as I predicted based on all the available literature".
 
2014-02-05 07:43:36 AM  

starsrift: DerAppie: Triumph: Gotta love "we have no idea what's going to happen" physics experiments.

I should send this to the professor who was my thesis counsellor. I distinctly remember her disputing my claim about science by saying "Just doing something to see what happens isn't science". Maybe hearing that NASA (and a few million dollars) is on my side of the discussion will change her mind.

Well, technically, she's correct. Science is analysis and observation. Provoking the event to analyze and observe is engineering, something which most scientists dabble in, these days. :)


Is the iterary process somehow excluded from "science" ??  (according to your Prof)

I think not. They are intimately entwined.

/ your "prof" should be sent packin
 
2014-02-05 07:49:12 AM  
No wind chill jokes?
 
2014-02-05 08:00:49 AM  
4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2014-02-05 08:15:45 AM  
static2.wikia.nocookie.net

"When this baby hits 88 picokelvin, you're going to see some seriously-frozen sh*t..."
 
2014-02-05 10:22:08 AM  
So they can safely rule out that the supercooled condensate will cause a massive explosion or worse?  (Since they "don't know WHAT it will do" .)  What are the parameters by which scientists judge the potential safety of things like this and the supercolliders?

Or is the article just exaggerating and the scientists already have a good idea of possible outcomes for the experiment?

See ya in the wormhole, folks.  Hawking already called dibs on the shotgun seat.
 
2014-02-05 10:53:08 AM  

Far Cough: So they can safely rule out that the supercooled condensate will cause a massive explosion or worse?


Seems unlikely, since cooling is effectively the removal of energy from a system.

starsrift: Well, technically, she's correct. Science is analysis and observation. Provoking the event to analyze and observe is engineering, something which most scientists dabble in, these days. :)


She's just as technically incorrect. An experiment isn't as such if you know what is going to happen when you run it. If we knew what would happen when this thing gets switched on, why would we build and use it?
 
2014-02-05 11:12:07 AM  
"The crazy thing is, though, no one even knows what this Bose-Einstein condensate will actually do once we cool it down to 100 picokelvin. No one's ever done it before, and no one knows where it will lead. How exciting!"


I've seen this movie, the black guy dies first.
 
2014-02-05 01:09:33 PM  

starsrift: DerAppie: Triumph: Gotta love "we have no idea what's going to happen" physics experiments.

I should send this to the professor who was my thesis counsellor. I distinctly remember her disputing my claim about science by saying "Just doing something to see what happens isn't science". Maybe hearing that NASA (and a few million dollars) is on my side of the discussion will change her mind.

Well, technically, she's correct. Science is analysis and observation. Provoking the event to analyze and observe is engineering, something which most scientists dabble in, these days. :)


I go with a simple division which is that engineering is the practical application of science. The experiment in the article clearly is not at the practical application stage. So it's a science experiment.

I suppose one could argue that it is not "rigorous formal scientific method"(TM). But then that is exactly the sort of complaint that I would expect from a bookish person who became a teacher instead of ever actually doing anything. If it was up to such people we would still be writing our theories on cave walls with ochre mixed with animal blood.

If we declare that trial and error is not science then that leaves out most of the medical fields. If we say that passive observation isn't science then astronomers get left out. In the end, I think if you go by a strict interpretation of "the scientific method" as writ in stone in academia, then there are only maybe three scientists in the world today.
 
2014-02-05 01:13:46 PM  
Greg Bear wrote a short story about this. I don't think it went too well for the protagonist.

I think it's in the same short story collection as Hardfought (which is an excellent read). Scent of a Burning Woman?
 
2014-02-05 02:17:24 PM  
"The crazy thing is, though, no one even knows what this Bose-Einstein condensate will actually do once we cool it down to 100 picokelvin. "

Last time a guy started messing with stuff like this, we got Headcrabs.

static2.wikia.nocookie.net


/Just say "NO" to Resonance Cascades.
 
2014-02-05 04:04:02 PM  

washington-babylon: /Just say "NO" to Resonance Cascades.


I've heard of Resonance Cascades, but I never thought I'd be a part of one.

/They're waiting for you, Gordon. In the Test Chamber.
 
2014-02-05 07:51:38 PM  
scm-l3.technorati.com
 
2014-02-05 08:23:00 PM  
We don't need condensates where we're going.
 
2014-02-06 02:01:40 AM  
After reading this, I am confused. Space is already -450F. They are just trying to get to -459?
 
2014-02-06 07:47:01 AM  

bank7883: After reading this, I am confused. Space is already -450F. They are just trying to get to -459?


I'm gonna throw out a guess and say you probably need more than your normal refrigeration type unit for those 9 degrees. I also think the -450 gives them a good head start so why not take advantage?
 
2014-02-06 11:19:24 AM  

Strik3r: bank7883: After reading this, I am confused. Space is already -450F. They are just trying to get to -459?

I'm gonna throw out a guess and say you probably need more than your normal refrigeration type unit for those 9 degrees. I also think the -450 gives them a good head start so why not take advantage?


Yeah, I thought the article made clear that every new tenth of a degree below that 1 Degree Kelvin becomes increasingly difficult to achieve.  Which makes a little intuitive sense at least.
 
2014-02-06 11:25:13 AM  
Obligatory.

www.baen.com

/if she really looked like that I think they would have found another way
/huh, Wikipedia says the story was plagiarized
 
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