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(Quartz)   In 2013, the ocean gained the heat equivalent to about 12 Hiroshima nuclear bombs per second   (qz.com ) divider line
    More: Scary, Hiroshima, nuclear weapons, Kevin Trenberth, global ocean, moving average, ocean temperature, climate change, oceans  
•       •       •

6393 clicks; posted to Main » on 04 Feb 2014 at 5:31 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-02-04 04:27:43 PM  
Does this mean I won't have to cook my seafood anymore?
 
2014-02-04 04:39:33 PM  
At this rate my grandchildren will equate corals, molluscs and oysters to dodo birds and carrier pigeons.
 
2014-02-04 04:40:14 PM  
How many Library of Congresses is that?


/climate change is a lie that's only supported by mountains of data
 
2014-02-04 04:42:30 PM  
To be fair, the ocean is pretty big.
 
2014-02-04 05:19:55 PM  
How much is that in Fukushimas?
 
2014-02-04 05:32:45 PM  
Heh, I need that converted into Rhode Islands.
 
2014-02-04 05:33:23 PM  
Does anybody know the conversion between that and Olympic sized swimming pools?
 
2014-02-04 05:34:49 PM  
if you stacked the water molecules to the moon how many would they take this year versus last year?
 
2014-02-04 05:35:08 PM  
i.ytimg.com
 
2014-02-04 05:36:06 PM  
This kind of shiat goes right into the...
1.bp.blogspot.com

Category.
 
2014-02-04 05:36:07 PM  

Mr. Fuzzypaws: To be fair, the ocean is pretty big.


oh yeah? well you can drown with a glass of water

so there
 
2014-02-04 05:36:17 PM  
Will this really peave off a certain squid-like deep ocean dweller?
 
2014-02-04 05:36:44 PM  
Enjoy your sushi while you can.
 
2014-02-04 05:37:41 PM  
That explains it all.
I've been freezing my ass off because the ocean sucked up all the heat?
 
2014-02-04 05:38:57 PM  

Voiceofreason01: Does anybody know the conversion between that and Olympic sized swimming pools?


That's like trying to convert between a light year and a month, or between a pound and a hogshead.

DOES NOT COMPUTE.
 
2014-02-04 05:39:32 PM  
In the 1970's, the common unit of measurement was the School Bus.
 
2014-02-04 05:39:33 PM  
Is that more or less than a metric buttload? I'm having a hard time with the conversions.
 
2014-02-04 05:39:39 PM  
That little? Wow, I figured it would be more.

Then again, using something on a scale that is scary to humans but is tiny on a planetary sizes to sensationalize articles is a great way to to get people to agree with you.
 
2014-02-04 05:40:13 PM  
Can we now mine heat from the Ocean as an energy source?
 
2014-02-04 05:40:15 PM  

Mr. Fuzzypaws: To be fair, the ocean is pretty big.


To be fair, the guys ass that these numbers were pulled out of is pretty big.
 
2014-02-04 05:40:52 PM  
I hate shock statistics. But that is shocking.
 
2014-02-04 05:41:37 PM  

Dinjiin: Voiceofreason01: Does anybody know the conversion between that and Olympic sized swimming pools?

That's like trying to convert between a light year and a month, or between a pound and a hogshead.

DOES NOT COMPUTE.


hey look, there goes the joke waaaaaaay over there:
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2014-02-04 05:41:55 PM  

Voiceofreason01: Does anybody know the conversion between that and Olympic sized swimming pools?


Less than one parsec.
 
2014-02-04 05:42:28 PM  

Dinjiin: Voiceofreason01: Does anybody know the conversion between that and Olympic sized swimming pools?

That's like trying to convert between a light year and a month, or between a pound and a hogshead.

DOES NOT COMPUTE.


Exactly how many desks is that?

Really, that's like trying to measure the number of thimbles of water there are in Lake Superior.
 
2014-02-04 05:43:23 PM  

zulius: Will this really peave off a certain squid-like deep ocean dweller?


Squidward?
 
2014-02-04 05:43:40 PM  

Brick-House: To be fair, the guys ass that these numbers were pulled out of is pretty big.


NODC Climate labratory is pretty big, but, I'd describe it more as an office and less of a brick-house.
 
2014-02-04 05:43:59 PM  
I was watching a Nova episode on the super typhoon that hit the Philippines a bit back and they said the water was 86 degrees DOWN TO 300 FEET.  And it was from like Palau to Mindanao.  Hundreds of miles of 300 feet thick 86 degree water.
Global warming will hit the oceans first and when they can't take the thermal brunt, it will come to the air.  I think we are going to find out very quickly how fast nature can change.
And we will be living our own version of "The Inner Light".

/Our planet is being destroyed so the rich can stay rich.  Really.  That's the whole reason.
 
2014-02-04 05:44:07 PM  

washington-babylon: Can we now mine heat from the Ocean as an energy source?


Technically we have always done that. Coastal cities stay warmer in the winter.
 
2014-02-04 05:44:31 PM  
Doing the math, that's only 378,432,000 h-bombs.
 
2014-02-04 05:46:40 PM  

Dinjiin: Voiceofreason01: Does anybody know the conversion between that and Olympic sized swimming pools?

That's like trying to convert between a light year and a month, or between a pound and a hogshead.

DOES NOT COMPUTE.


Volume of the ocean: 1,347,000,000 cu km
Volume of an Olympic size swimming pool: 1000 cu m

So 1.347 trillion Olympic swimming pools.
 
2014-02-04 05:47:09 PM  
I got 0.0047 degrees C?  Can anyone double-check my math?
 
2014-02-04 05:47:52 PM  
365 days per year
24 hours per dYt
60 minutes per hour
60 seconds per minute
12 times per sec
 
2014-02-04 05:47:53 PM  
Thanks Obama.
 
2014-02-04 05:49:47 PM  

Mr. Fuzzypaws: To be fair, the ocean is pretty big.


O Ocean! Ooh, you are so big! So absolutely huge. Gosh, we're all really impressed down here, I can tell you.
 
2014-02-04 05:50:06 PM  

washington-babylon: Can we now mine heat from the Ocean as an energy source?


Theoretically yes, although there are a lot of practical problems to overcome.
 
2014-02-04 05:50:26 PM  
yeah right libs
 
2014-02-04 05:51:41 PM  

dougermouse: I was watching a Nova episode on the super typhoon that hit the Philippines a bit back and they said the water was 86 degrees DOWN TO 300 FEET.  And it was from like Palau to Mindanao.  Hundreds of miles of 300 feet thick 86 degree water.
Global warming will hit the oceans first and when they can't take the thermal brunt, it will come to the air.  I think we are going to find out very quickly how fast nature can change.
And we will be living our own version of "The Inner Light".

/Our planet is being destroyed so the rich can stay rich.  Really.  That's the whole reason.


Uhh, didn't you jump over something in that train of though? What if it's been that way for a long, long time. Such as before humans long. Just because it's that temp now doesn't mean it hasn't always been. The total amounts of water heating are very small. As in 1 degree F over the last century. That means 100 years ago it was hundreds of miles of 300 foot deep 85 degree water. This is a generalization, but it's also some perspective.

Yes, this is a major change, yes we need to work on it and very quickly. But you're really going from 0 to potato pretty quick there and not helping your cause. You're taking something fairly normal and attributing it to something that has very little bearing.
 
2014-02-04 05:52:03 PM  

MadMattressMack: That little? Wow, I figured it would be more.

Then again, using something on a scale that is scary to humans but is tiny on a planetary sizes to sensationalize articles is a great way to to get people to agree with you.



So are mass extinctions.
 
2014-02-04 05:53:14 PM  
Wake me when Godzilla comes.
 
2014-02-04 05:54:27 PM  
Their food is shiat.... except the toothpaste tube stuff.
 
2014-02-04 05:55:08 PM  
static.guim.co.uk
 
2014-02-04 05:55:25 PM  

Brick-House: Doing the math, that's only 378,432,000 h-bombs.


No, it's more like 756864 h-bombs.  If they were LARGE-yield h-bombs, it'd be down to 378,432.


Moral of the story: The Hiroshima bomb was not an H-bomb.
 
2014-02-04 05:55:33 PM  

amazing_live_seamonkeys: Their food is shiat.... except the toothpaste tube stuff.


This would have been slightly more pertinent in the Ikea thread.
 
2014-02-04 05:56:15 PM  

Ivo Shandor: washington-babylon: Can we now mine heat from the Ocean as an energy source?

Theoretically yes, although there are a lot of practical problems to overcome.


I read the wiki, and there is an operational plant in japan. Doesn't sound like there are any problems other than shelling out the cash to build a crapload of these plants.
 
2014-02-04 05:56:47 PM  

dougermouse: I was watching a Nova episode on the super typhoon that hit the Philippines a bit back and they said the water was 86 degrees DOWN TO 300 FEET.  And it was from like Palau to Mindanao.  Hundreds of miles of 300 feet thick 86 degree water.
Global warming will hit the oceans first and when they can't take the thermal brunt, it will come to the air.  I think we are going to find out very quickly how fast nature can change.
And we will be living our own version of "The Inner Light".

/Our planet is being destroyed so the rich can stay rich.  Really.  That's the whole reason.


saw the same episode, thought the same thing.  shiat's happening now, and gonna get much worse, very fast.  a lot faster than all the models predict, anyway.
 
2014-02-04 05:57:18 PM  

GhostFish: MadMattressMack: That little? Wow, I figured it would be more.

Then again, using something on a scale that is scary to humans but is tiny on a planetary sizes to sensationalize articles is a great way to to get people to agree with you.

It's a no win scenario. You can put it on a scale that's easy for a human to understand but you'll get accused of sensationalism. You can put it on a global scale to counter that, but then people ignore you for fretting over what looks to them like a negligible change. Even though it's not.


Very true.
 
2014-02-04 05:57:55 PM  
generallyso: MadMattressMack: That little? Wow, I figured it would be more.

Then again, using something on a scale that is scary to humans but is tiny on a planetary sizes to sensationalize articles is a great way to to get people to agree with you.


So are mass extinctions.

>> don't worry, there are always a few humans who survive and start the whole bullshiat all over again. Another 6000 years and we'll be back to thinking we're the most technological civilization that ever existed.
 
2014-02-04 05:59:45 PM  

washington-babylon: Can we now mine heat from the Ocean as an energy source?


That's actually an interesting question from someone I have shaded as a big troll. I will knock you down a notch on my asshole scale for that. Not really sure how to answer it though, I would guess that 85 degree water ain't gonna do much for power generation but it will devoid most of the life in the ocean if left unchecked, and cause more massive storms and weather patterns, so it's a lose/lose situation. If anyone can think of a better way we could harness that energy feel free to chime in.

/no i don't know what you said to become dark orange but I'm pretty consistent with my troll ratings, good on you for adding to the discussion today
//at least you weren't pants on head retarded red, so you got that going for you
///slashies say thanks
 
2014-02-04 06:00:24 PM  
MadMattressMack:

Uhh, didn't you jump over something in that train of though? What if it's been that way for a long, long time. Such as before humans long. Just because it's that temp now doesn't mean it hasn't always been. The total amounts of water heating are very small. As in 1 degree F over the last century. That means 100 years ago it was hundreds of miles of 300 foot deep 85 degree water. This is a generalization, but it's also some perspective.

Yes, this is a major change, yes we need to work on it and very quickly. But you're really going from 0 to potato pretty quick there and not helping your cause. You're taking something fairly normal and attributing it to something that has very little bearing.


I'm not going from 0 to potato.  I'm countering the FUD put out by the people that have the most to loose if we solve this problem.  It wasn't 85 last year, or the Typhoon over that area would have been just as bad.

What it comes down to is money.
The solution to climate change is to significantly modify our economic structures.  The world will die around us so that some very few can continue to make obscene amounts of money. Climate change won't effect the truly wealthy, they have the money to move, pay stupid amounts of money for food, etc. The rest of us, however, will be screwed. The only way to really "hurt" the wealthy is to change the economic game, thus they start proxy battles to keep the status quo. To keep their power.
Except unlike most other of their proxy wars, this one can end human civilization beyond their ability to buy a happy ending for themselves.  By the time the rich really appreciate the end game, it will be too late.  Their money will buy them more time, but how many rich people can live on Earth when it's more like Venus?

So you pick a side in the proxy war, fighting for the side that only cares for themselves.  What's the worst that happens if we correct this?  The Koch brothers might have to retire?

How bad must it get before we will take action?
 
2014-02-04 06:01:06 PM  

stir22: dougermouse: I was watching a Nova episode on the super typhoon that hit the Philippines a bit back and they said the water was 86 degrees DOWN TO 300 FEET.  And it was from like Palau to Mindanao.  Hundreds of miles of 300 feet thick 86 degree water.
Global warming will hit the oceans first and when they can't take the thermal brunt, it will come to the air.  I think we are going to find out very quickly how fast nature can change.
And we will be living our own version of "The Inner Light".

/Our planet is being destroyed so the rich can stay rich.  Really.  That's the whole reason.

saw the same episode, thought the same thing.  shiat's happening now, and gonna get much worse, very fast.  a lot faster than all the models predict, anyway.


[citationneeded.jpg]
 
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