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(The Raw Story)   From the Dept. of Hold Still This Won't Hurt a Bit: New battlefield gunshot wound treatment was inspired by 'Fix-a-Flat' tire repair foam   (rawstory.com) divider line 82
    More: Cool, gunshot wound, military medicine, tire repair, repair foam, brigade combat team, repairs  
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7357 clicks; posted to Main » on 04 Feb 2014 at 2:38 PM (37 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-02-04 01:48:22 PM  
I'm sure drag queens were already doing this. And this too:

encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com
 
2014-02-04 02:15:53 PM  
I don't care if it was inspired by a "As Seen on TV" product. As long as it works.
 
2014-02-04 02:44:23 PM  
but wait!...It stops diarrhea as well.
 
2014-02-04 02:44:59 PM  
As far as painful alternative, this looks a lot better than the Quik-Clot gauze, imagine getting fingerfarked in a gunshot wound by a combat medic shoving fabric down the hole.

/so let's shove a tampon applicator in there
//at least it's not a dildo
///it looks like a good product, hope it turns out for them.
 
2014-02-04 02:45:25 PM  
It's great for making your ass look huge as well.
 
2014-02-04 02:46:09 PM  
Sources say they're still not sure how altoids breath mints will seal the wound, but clinical trials are underway...
 
2014-02-04 02:46:49 PM  
FTFA: "That's what we pictured as the perfect solution: something you could spray in, it would expand, and bleeding stops," Steinbaugh said. "But we found that blood pressure is so high, blood would wash the foam right out."

That's too bad, I remember reading good things about the foam like it was made of stuff the body uses to heal. Maybe someday.
 
2014-02-04 02:47:16 PM  
Developed for field dressing wounds in Viet Nam
i19.photobucket.com
 
2014-02-04 02:47:30 PM  

Somaticasual: Sources say they're still not sure how altoids breath mints will seal the wound, but clinical trials are underway...


At least they're not shoving Mentos down there and then sterilizing it with Coke or Pepsi.

WHOOO HOOOOO!
 
2014-02-04 02:47:38 PM  
I'm a doctor, not a tire repairman!
scifanatic.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com
 
2014-02-04 02:49:09 PM  

TheWarp: As far as painful alternative, this looks a lot better than the Quik-Clot gauze, imagine getting fingerfarked in a gunshot wound by a combat medic shoving fabric down the hole.

/so let's shove a tampon applicator in there
//at least it's not a dildo
///it looks like a good product, hope it turns out for them.


the powder versions of that stuff hurt just as bad, if not worse. holy shiat that stuff lights up every bloody nerve ending at max output.

i'm convinced the pain from plugging something with the gauze is NOT from the fabric.

but with something spray-foam based, i bet you they can work in a really strong topical anesthetic, like lidocaine, along with antibiotics.
 
2014-02-04 02:49:30 PM  
img2-2.timeinc.net
 
2014-02-04 02:49:43 PM  
Also effective against gorram reaver wounds
 
2014-02-04 02:49:56 PM  
CSB:

I met a guy that was a medic in Iraq. He came up with the idea of putting those sticky mouse trap pads over the wounds. He said because of the sand and sweat gauze was almost useless. He got the OK from the doctors and top brass to continue using them because they were highly effective.
 
2014-02-04 02:50:16 PM  
Why not like a little tampon with sponges and mesh, that you can, with little medical experience, jam in and squeeze expanding sealing foam into? Even directional?

/Very little medical knowledge, never seen combat gunshot wounds
//Sounds like it will save a lot of lives
 
2014-02-04 02:52:11 PM  
 
2014-02-04 02:52:20 PM  

Crewmannumber6: Developed for field dressing wounds in Viet Nam
[i19.photobucket.com image 526x700]


myth. originally developed as a substitute for glass in bombsights. stuck to the molds so they scrapped it. was released as a glue sometime in the 50s.

also not very healthy to use as an emergency suture. regular cyanoacrylate forms formeldehyde upon contact with blood.

vetbond on the other hand is great stuff, totally safe.
 
2014-02-04 02:52:20 PM  
Fix a Flat is good shiat. Got my college car thru many a tight spot. By the time I graduated, the inside of one tire was probably 95% FaF, 5% air.
 
2014-02-04 02:52:38 PM  
That's pretty nifty.  Especially if they can include anesthetics and/or coagulants in the sponges.

I do wonder however what the plan becomes if that doesn't stop the bleeding.  fishing out individual sponges would potentially be worse than pulling out a contiguous strip of gauze.
 
2014-02-04 02:52:56 PM  

99.998er: CSB:

I met a guy that was a medic in Iraq. He came up with the idea of putting those sticky mouse trap pads over the wounds. He said because of the sand and sweat gauze was almost useless. He got the OK from the doctors and top brass to continue using them because they were highly effective.


And as an added bonus, it stopped mice from entering the wounds.
 
2014-02-04 02:56:29 PM  
images.moviepostershop.com
 
2014-02-04 02:57:19 PM  
As someone who changed thousands of tires at work as a teenager, I can tell you:

"Fix-a-flat" is not a "Foam".

It is a liquid, which swirls around in the tire.  It is also a horrific pain in the ass, not the least of which is the fact that it makes it impossible to properly balance a tire.  Leading to uncorrectable vibrations.

It also binds to any dirt or rubber dust inside the tire, leading to the creation of blacks spheres of more or less solid crud referred to as "tire turds".  Leading to mysterious noises that naive drivers end up paying large amounts of money to unscrupulous mechanics to "fix".  (The actual fix: deflate the tire, pop one bead off the rim, shake the turds out, reseat the tire and re-inflate. Ta-da.)

Then there's the fact that it simply doesn't work at its primary task of, you know, fixing flats.

Don't waste your money, folks.
 
2014-02-04 02:59:15 PM  

Somaticasual: Sources say they're still not sure how altoids breath mints will seal the wound, but clinical trials are underway...


Junior mints are great for fighting infections..

www.sweetcitycandy.com

And they're very refreshing.
 
2014-02-04 03:00:04 PM  
Walmart = %4.50 for pack of 4
Dept. of Defense = $120 for a single
1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2014-02-04 03:00:04 PM  

Deucednuisance: As someone who changed thousands of tires at work as a teenager, I can tell you:

"Fix-a-flat" is not a "Foam".

It is a liquid, which swirls around in the tire.  It is also a horrific pain in the ass, not the least of which is the fact that it makes it impossible to properly balance a tire.  Leading to uncorrectable vibrations.

It also binds to any dirt or rubber dust inside the tire, leading to the creation of blacks spheres of more or less solid crud referred to as "tire turds".  Leading to mysterious noises that naive drivers end up paying large amounts of money to unscrupulous mechanics to "fix".  (The actual fix: deflate the tire, pop one bead off the rim, shake the turds out, reseat the tire and re-inflate. Ta-da.)

Then there's the fact that it simply doesn't work at its primary task of, you know, fixing flats.

Don't waste your money, folks.


Slime is a different story.  Dries in a nice uniform film.  You don't get a tire full of "possum milk" when you unmount.

/18 months busting tires at Sears in college.
 
2014-02-04 03:00:19 PM  
img.fark.net
 
2014-02-04 03:00:24 PM  
www.games-workshop.com
 
2014-02-04 03:01:06 PM  

Deucednuisance: As someone who changed thousands of tires at work as a teenager, I can tell you:

"Fix-a-flat" is not a "Foam".

It is a liquid, which swirls around in the tire.  It is also a horrific pain in the ass, not the least of which is the fact that it makes it impossible to properly balance a tire.  Leading to uncorrectable vibrations.

It also binds to any dirt or rubber dust inside the tire, leading to the creation of blacks spheres of more or less solid crud referred to as "tire turds".  Leading to mysterious noises that naive drivers end up paying large amounts of money to unscrupulous mechanics to "fix".  (The actual fix: deflate the tire, pop one bead off the rim, shake the turds out, reseat the tire and re-inflate. Ta-da.)

Then there's the fact that it simply doesn't work at its primary task of, you know, fixing flats.

Don't waste your money, folks.


my understanding was that it's intended use is to get you back driving long enough to get to a tire shop. it's in no way intended to be long-term(though i think that tire slime stuff is). i've used it for that, and so long as the hole is in the tread it's okay at it.

fun note about the tire turds. that's my new favorite phrase.
 
2014-02-04 03:04:31 PM  

NkThrasher: That's pretty nifty.  Especially if they can include anesthetics and/or coagulants in the sponges.

I do wonder however what the plan becomes if that doesn't stop the bleeding.  fishing out individual sponges would potentially be worse than pulling out a contiguous strip of gauze.


Maybe the sponges could be connected by monofilament (fishing line, essentially).  You just grab one, and they all come out en masse.  Although that has its drawbacks as well- you might not WANT all of them to come out.  But then again, you could pull out the ones you need, snip the line, and proceed as planned.  Use something strong yet bioabsorbable for the line.

I like the idea of anesthetics and coagulants in the sponges.  I'd suggest antibiotics and anti-shock medications as well, but there are too many allergies to the former and the latter needs careful monitoring.

The nice thing about this approach is that it's simple enough that you could teach it to your average grunt.  When I went through basic training, all they taught us was how to unwrap the pitifully ineffective gauze bandages and slap them on the wound.  For a simple wound, that's fine.  Anything more serious, and you might as well not have bothered.  I could see this idea put into a form factor that any one could learn to apply with no more than an afternoon's training.

If this pans out, I want a handful of these things for my wilderness first aid pack.
 
2014-02-04 03:04:56 PM  
Came for the "Damn it Jim" reference, leaving happy.

Hey, fix-a-flat is used for cosmetic butt procedures in some clinics.
 
2014-02-04 03:05:02 PM  
www.vintagepaperads.com
 
2014-02-04 03:05:28 PM  

tricycleracer: Slime is a different story.  Dries in a nice uniform film.  You don't get a tire full of "possum milk" when you unmount.


"Possum milk", tee-hee.  I don't think we had a name for it other than "aww, crap!"  I was working in the days before rubber monkeys wore latex gloves.  You opened up a fix-a-flat tire and got that shiate on your hands, well, you were going to have a bad day.
 
2014-02-04 03:05:45 PM  

Crewmannumber6: Developed for field dressing wounds in Viet Nam
[i19.photobucket.com image 526x700]


I work in printing and I'm forever getting cuts on my hands. I carry one or two tubes of Super Glue in my tool box and a spare in my lunch box.

I patched up a guy at work last week. He cut his thumb up pretty good and wasn't having much luck with bandages and tape so I glued his cut. Then I took a small bit of paper and glued it over the cut. Works like a champ.

He thought I was nuts at first, but he's a believer now.
 
2014-02-04 03:13:20 PM  

tricycleracer: Deucednuisance: As someone who changed thousands of tires at work as a teenager, I can tell you:

"Fix-a-flat" is not a "Foam".

It is a liquid, which swirls around in the tire.  It is also a horrific pain in the ass, not the least of which is the fact that it makes it impossible to properly balance a tire.  Leading to uncorrectable vibrations.

It also binds to any dirt or rubber dust inside the tire, leading to the creation of blacks spheres of more or less solid crud referred to as "tire turds".  Leading to mysterious noises that naive drivers end up paying large amounts of money to unscrupulous mechanics to "fix".  (The actual fix: deflate the tire, pop one bead off the rim, shake the turds out, reseat the tire and re-inflate. Ta-da.)

Then there's the fact that it simply doesn't work at its primary task of, you know, fixing flats.

Don't waste your money, folks.

Slime is a different story.  Dries in a nice uniform film.  You don't get a tire full of "possum milk" when you unmount.

/18 months busting tires at Sears in college.


yeah, basically it spreads out as the tire spins and creates a soft rubber layer filled with little fibers, and it's the resilient rubber and the fibers that actually seals the flat.

and how.

doesn't do dick for sidewall/edge of tread tho. maybe a little on edge of tread.
 
2014-02-04 03:16:06 PM  

tillerman35: The nice thing about this approach is that it's simple enough that you could teach it to your average grunt.  When I went through basic training, all they taught us was how to unwrap the pitifully ineffective gauze bandages and slap them on the wound.  For a simple wound, that's fine.  Anything more serious, and you might as well not have bothered.  I could see this idea put into a form factor that any one could learn to apply with no more than an afternoon's training.


You didn't get the "pressure bandage" crevate training?

I ended up going through Combat Life Saver (AKA "you're now trained to force hydrate with an IV if ordered") which went a little farther than the standard bandage / pressure bandage / tourniquet training for puncture wounds.  But not to my memory as far as timelines of when to pull the gauze out, just that if it's obviously a puncture stick some in, then put a pressure bandage on over it.

I definitely agree though that this would be easy to train.  Stick this thing into the wound, push on this other thing until the wound is full, put a standard bandage / sticky mouse trap on over it.
 
2014-02-04 03:17:38 PM  

Abe Vigoda's Ghost: 99.998er: CSB:

I met a guy that was a medic in Iraq. He came up with the idea of putting those sticky mouse trap pads over the wounds. He said because of the sand and sweat gauze was almost useless. He got the OK from the doctors and top brass to continue using them because they were highly effective.

And as an added bonus, it stopped mice from entering the wounds.


*snert!*
 
2014-02-04 03:18:39 PM  
No mention of Quik-Clot?  Seems conspicuously absent from the article.  That would in my mind be the first course of action for a deep bleeder (rather than plain kerlix as the article implies).  Also, from what I've heard, tampons have been used as field-expedient "deep and narrow" wounds for quite some time now.

Still looks like a good product.

but with something spray-foam based, i bet you they can work in a really strong topical anesthetic, like lidocaine, along with antibiotics

Good idea in therory but then you may be putting lido in the blood stream, possibly causing arrythmia in somebody already losing blood.
 
2014-02-04 03:21:17 PM  
So, a precursor to omni-gel?
 
2014-02-04 03:29:44 PM  

admiral_neckbeard: No mention of Quik-Clot?  Seems conspicuously absent from the article.  That would in my mind be the first course of action for a deep bleeder (rather than plain kerlix as the article implies).  Also, from what I've heard, tampons have been used as field-expedient "deep and narrow" wounds for quite some time now.

Still looks like a good product.

but with something spray-foam based, i bet you they can work in a really strong topical anesthetic, like lidocaine, along with antibiotics

Good idea in therory but then you may be putting lido in the blood stream, possibly causing arrythmia in somebody already losing blood.


oo, point.

still, there's got to be something they could use, either as a local or general, that gets applied in safe levels.
 
2014-02-04 03:30:56 PM  
i.imgur.com

Read the article, they are injecting these into wounds.
 
2014-02-04 03:31:43 PM  

admiral_neckbeard: No mention of Quik-Clot?  Seems conspicuously absent from the article.  That would in my mind be the first course of action for a deep bleeder (rather than plain kerlix as the article implies).  Also, from what I've heard, tampons have been used as field-expedient "deep and narrow" wounds for quite some time now.

Still looks like a good product.

but with something spray-foam based, i bet you they can work in a really strong topical anesthetic, like lidocaine, along with antibiotics

Good idea in therory but then you may be putting lido in the blood stream, possibly causing arrythmia in somebody already losing blood.


So you watched Shooter yesterday too huh?
 
2014-02-04 03:36:39 PM  

Road Rash: Abe Vigoda's Ghost: 99.998er: CSB:

I met a guy that was a medic in Iraq. He came up with the idea of putting those sticky mouse trap pads over the wounds. He said because of the sand and sweat gauze was almost useless. He got the OK from the doctors and top brass to continue using them because they were highly effective.

And as an added bonus, it stopped mice from entering the wounds.

*snert!*


That seems kind of scary. Wouldn't you expect a mouse killing tool to be full of chemicals that might be bad for a living human's bloodstream? And how would they get the pad off? Yikes!
 
2014-02-04 03:39:05 PM  

Deucednuisance: As someone who changed thousands of tires at work as a teenager, I can tell you:

"Fix-a-flat" is not a "Foam".

It is a liquid, which swirls around in the tire.  It is also a horrific pain in the ass, not the least of which is the fact that it makes it impossible to properly balance a tire.  Leading to uncorrectable vibrations.

It also binds to any dirt or rubber dust inside the tire, leading to the creation of blacks spheres of more or less solid crud referred to as "tire turds".  Leading to mysterious noises that naive drivers end up paying large amounts of money to unscrupulous mechanics to "fix".  (The actual fix: deflate the tire, pop one bead off the rim, shake the turds out, reseat the tire and re-inflate. Ta-da.)

Then there's the fact that it simply doesn't work at its primary task of, you know, fixing flats.

Don't waste your money, folks.


Also if your car is newer with Tire Pressure Monitors, you just made the bill so much higher when you replace the tire. TPM systems hate Fix-a-flat.
 
2014-02-04 03:47:14 PM  

tricycleracer: Deucednuisance: As someone who changed thousands of tires at work as a teenager, I can tell you:

"Fix-a-flat" is not a "Foam".

It is a liquid, which swirls around in the tire.  It is also a horrific pain in the ass, not the least of which is the fact that it makes it impossible to properly balance a tire.  Leading to uncorrectable vibrations.

It also binds to any dirt or rubber dust inside the tire, leading to the creation of blacks spheres of more or less solid crud referred to as "tire turds".  Leading to mysterious noises that naive drivers end up paying large amounts of money to unscrupulous mechanics to "fix".  (The actual fix: deflate the tire, pop one bead off the rim, shake the turds out, reseat the tire and re-inflate. Ta-da.)

Then there's the fact that it simply doesn't work at its primary task of, you know, fixing flats.

Don't waste your money, folks.

Slime is a different story.  Dries in a nice uniform film.  You don't get a tire full of "possum milk" when you unmount.

/18 months busting tires at Sears in college.


Plug kit costs about the same as a can of fix a flat,will repair said flat more reliably,and doesn't have possum milk or tire turds
 
2014-02-04 03:55:13 PM  

Jument: Road Rash: Abe Vigoda's Ghost: 99.998er: CSB:

I met a guy that was a medic in Iraq. He came up with the idea of putting those sticky mouse trap pads over the wounds. He said because of the sand and sweat gauze was almost useless. He got the OK from the doctors and top brass to continue using them because they were highly effective.

And as an added bonus, it stopped mice from entering the wounds.

*snert!*

That seems kind of scary. Wouldn't you expect a mouse killing tool to be full of chemicals that might be bad for a living human's bloodstream? And how would they get the pad off? Yikes!


"TRAPPER Glue Boards capture rats and mice without poison. - See more at: http://www.domyownpestcontrol.com/trapper-mouse-glue-board-traps-p-76 . html#.dpuf "
 
2014-02-04 03:58:34 PM  

Jument: Road Rash: Abe Vigoda's Ghost: 99.998er: CSB:

I met a guy that was a medic in Iraq. He came up with the idea of putting those sticky mouse trap pads over the wounds. He said because of the sand and sweat gauze was almost useless. He got the OK from the doctors and top brass to continue using them because they were highly effective.

And as an added bonus, it stopped mice from entering the wounds.

*snert!*

That seems kind of scary. Wouldn't you expect a mouse killing tool to be full of chemicals that might be bad for a living human's bloodstream? And how would they get the pad off? Yikes!


Most glue traps are made of food grade ingredients. That's what we use at our egg processing plants for mouse control.
 
2014-02-04 03:58:46 PM  
I could use this every summer for music festival season... would help with the runs.
 
2014-02-04 04:04:50 PM  
Tampons also work great for controlling the bleeding of a gunshot round.  That's not a joke, they work.  Plus, they are sterile in the package.
 
2014-02-04 04:05:00 PM  
3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2014-02-04 04:06:29 PM  

Some Coke Drinking Guy: Tampons also work great for controlling the bleeding of a gunshot round.  That's not a joke, they work.  Plus, they are sterile in the package.


Yep. And the ends of them are great for nose bleeds if you have to.
 
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