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(Video Spew)   You probably wouldn't have gotten your car stuck in the snow if you'd had some bigger rims   (videospew.com ) divider line
    More: Stupid, Hips Don't Lie, snow  
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5031 clicks; posted to Video » on 04 Feb 2014 at 9:10 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



24 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2014-02-04 08:52:32 AM  
It doesn't have anything to do with the size of the rims, but the size of the rubber patch touching the ground for traction. If the rims make the tires skinnier, then yeah. But most of the rims I've seen have regular-width tires on them. And all bets are off when you're on ice. Even four-wheel drive trucks with big tires have trouble getting traction on it.
 
2014-02-04 09:19:13 AM  
All his friends told him to invest that money in retirement savings or make an extra payment on his split-level suburban home.
 
2014-02-04 09:22:59 AM  

SmackLT: It doesn't have anything to do with the size of the rims, but the size of the rubber patch touching the ground for traction. If the rims make the tires skinnier, then yeah. But most of the rims I've seen have regular-width tires on them. And all bets are off when you're on ice. Even four-wheel drive trucks with big tires have trouble getting traction on it.


I have a friend that drivers a new dodge dart. He was going on and on the other day about how he needed skinnier tires so he could get through the ice and snow better. I told him he wanted wider tires for more contact for better traction. Needless to say, we argued about who was right until both of us said fark it and it was not worth arguing about anymore. Never did look up any info on who was correct.
 
2014-02-04 09:26:00 AM  
Needs 22" Blizzak low profile studded snow and ice tires.  They do make them don't they ?
 
2014-02-04 09:34:26 AM  

wild9: SmackLT: It doesn't have anything to do with the size of the rims, but the size of the rubber patch touching the ground for traction. If the rims make the tires skinnier, then yeah. But most of the rims I've seen have regular-width tires on them. And all bets are off when you're on ice. Even four-wheel drive trucks with big tires have trouble getting traction on it.

I have a friend that drivers a new dodge dart. He was going on and on the other day about how he needed skinnier tires so he could get through the ice and snow better. I told him he wanted wider tires for more contact for better traction. Needless to say, we argued about who was right until both of us said fark it and it was not worth arguing about anymore. Never did look up any info on who was correct.


Your friend was correct.
 
Bf+
2014-02-04 09:36:32 AM  

SmackLT: It doesn't have anything to do with the size of the rims


This. Well... these rims anyway.  The tires accompanying such rims do tend to be low-profile, however, making it a little more difficult to drive on partially inflated tires (in order to increase the amount of rubber touching the road, increasing traction.

wild9: I have a friend that drivers a new dodge dart. He was going on and on the other day about how he needed skinnier tires so he could get through the ice and snow better.


Skinnier tires don't help on ice, but in snow (especially deep snow) they can help "cut through" the snow providing better steering and avoid "snowplaning".
 
2014-02-04 10:39:55 AM  
i drive a RWD car. it's a manual, but it still needs winter tires, so i have a set of nokian WRG2s on right now. brilliant tires.
 
2014-02-04 01:16:15 PM  

wild9: SmackLT: It doesn't have anything to do with the size of the rims, but the size of the rubber patch touching the ground for traction. If the rims make the tires skinnier, then yeah. But most of the rims I've seen have regular-width tires on them. And all bets are off when you're on ice. Even four-wheel drive trucks with big tires have trouble getting traction on it.

I have a friend that drivers a new dodge dart. He was going on and on the other day about how he needed skinnier tires so he could get through the ice and snow better. I told him he wanted wider tires for more contact for better traction. Needless to say, we argued about who was right until both of us said fark it and it was not worth arguing about anymore. Never did look up any info on who was correct.


He was right, skinnier is better in snow.
 
2014-02-04 01:50:58 PM  

mudpants: Needs 22" Blizzak low profile studded snow and ice tires.  They do make them don't they ?


Those were, like, 30s or something. I don't think they make a 255/0.6-30 in Blizzaks.
 
2014-02-04 01:55:17 PM  
This all boils down to the correct tires for the condition. I have a car that won't move a car length in 2 inches of snow with it's summer-only rubber, but it's nearly unstoppable in much deeper muck with dedicated snows.
 
2014-02-04 02:55:34 PM  
What weighs more, "normal" rims and normal tires, or those rims and those tires"

Because what would have helped in this case was the heaviest combination.

I wonder how Goodyear airless tires would have worked?
 
2014-02-04 06:48:43 PM  
Hit a pothole or curb with one of those rim/tire combos... done... gets expensive...
 
2014-02-04 07:14:48 PM  

wild9: SmackLT: It doesn't have anything to do with the size of the rims, but the size of the rubber patch touching the ground for traction. If the rims make the tires skinnier, then yeah. But most of the rims I've seen have regular-width tires on them. And all bets are off when you're on ice. Even four-wheel drive trucks with big tires have trouble getting traction on it.

I have a friend that drivers a new dodge dart. He was going on and on the other day about how he needed skinnier tires so he could get through the ice and snow better. I told him he wanted wider tires for more contact for better traction. Needless to say, we argued about who was right until both of us said fark it and it was not worth arguing about anymore. Never did look up any info on who was correct.


I know this was already covered, but:

i.imgur.com
 
2014-02-04 08:08:45 PM  

Gleeman: wild9: SmackLT: It doesn't have anything to do with the size of the rims, but the size of the rubber patch touching the ground for traction. If the rims make the tires skinnier, then yeah. But most of the rims I've seen have regular-width tires on them. And all bets are off when you're on ice. Even four-wheel drive trucks with big tires have trouble getting traction on it.

I have a friend that drivers a new dodge dart. He was going on and on the other day about how he needed skinnier tires so he could get through the ice and snow better. I told him he wanted wider tires for more contact for better traction. Needless to say, we argued about who was right until both of us said fark it and it was not worth arguing about anymore. Never did look up any info on who was correct.

I know this was already covered, but:

[i.imgur.com image 640x480]

farm5.staticflickr.com
Would like a word with you.
 
2014-02-04 08:20:55 PM  
Bet that Jeep would keep going when that behemoth bogs down in the muck due to it's weight. Military Hummers don't run around on huge tires (still relatively narrow for the size of a hummer) for a good reason. Of course both would be screwed on ice like in the article.
 
2014-02-04 09:38:11 PM  

Gleeman: Bet that Jeep would keep going when that behemoth bogs down in the muck due to it's weight. Military Hummers don't run around on huge tires (still relatively narrow for the size of a hummer) for a good reason. Of course both would be screwed on ice like in the article.


Behemoth sticks the Jeep in its bed and then, weighted down, both cross the ice safely.
 
2014-02-04 10:10:29 PM  
The only thing that matters a lot on snow/ice is the type of rubber compound and tread on your tires. No all-season tires - no go on snow.
 
2014-02-04 10:36:59 PM  

RoyBatty: Gleeman: Bet that Jeep would keep going when that behemoth bogs down in the muck due to it's weight. Military Hummers don't run around on huge tires (still relatively narrow for the size of a hummer) for a good reason. Of course both would be screwed on ice like in the article.

Behemoth sticks the Jeep in its bed and then, weighted down, both cross the ice safely.


Should've showed him the pic of the world's tallest monster truck.  Those 10' wheels were built for driving in the arctic, they were later put on Bigfoot.
 
2014-02-04 10:47:19 PM  

Stepqhen: Gleeman: wild9: SmackLT: It doesn't have anything to do with the size of the rims, but the size of the rubber patch touching the ground for traction. If the rims make the tires skinnier, then yeah. But most of the rims I've seen have regular-width tires on them. And all bets are off when you're on ice. Even four-wheel drive trucks with big tires have trouble getting traction on it.

I have a friend that drivers a new dodge dart. He was going on and on the other day about how he needed skinnier tires so he could get through the ice and snow better. I told him he wanted wider tires for more contact for better traction. Needless to say, we argued about who was right until both of us said fark it and it was not worth arguing about anymore. Never did look up any info on who was correct.

I know this was already covered, but:

[i.imgur.com image 640x480]
[farm5.staticflickr.com image 850x637]
Would like a word with you.


Don't forget, Top Gear UK would also have something to say about skinny tires in snow.

image.trucktrend.com

/It's all relative. How much snow? How knobby are the tires?
 
2014-02-05 12:00:07 AM  
A rim is an outer portion of a wheel. Would you call your steering wheel a steering rim?
 
2014-02-05 01:33:27 AM  

FlashHarry: i drive a RWD car. it's a manual, but it still needs winter tires, so i have a set of nokian WRG2s on right now. brilliant tires.


Yeah, I think that RWD might have killed him more than anything. We don't get much snow in town here, too low, but the last big snow we had I saw RWD car spinning it's tires in a parking lot. Chains on the front. I kid you not.
 
2014-02-05 04:20:34 AM  
It all relative. I snow that is shallow enough to reach the bottom without floating the car/truck you want skinny snow/ice tires. Studs really help a ton on ice by actually digging in, but aren't going to last long when you clear the ice. If the snow is really deep that's when you want big wide tires so you can try to stay on top of everything.
 
2014-02-05 06:16:31 AM  

NBSV: It all relative. I snow that is shallow enough to reach the bottom without floating the car/truck you want skinny snow/ice tires. Studs really help a ton on ice by actually digging in, but aren't going to last long when you clear the ice. If the snow is really deep that's when you want big wide tires so you can try to stay on top of everything.


This. When it comes to ice, all that matters is biting surfaces on the tire - in particular the outside edges. This is why dual-tired pickups and semis have a small advantage on ice (although often the extra weight of those vehicles causes problems when it come to stopping that easily offset the small gain). Studs are the best you can do - they last much longer than chains do (although chains are the bomb offroad), are much cheaper to boot - especially in northern areas where they are common and popular.

For snow, it really depends on the conditions - shallow and/or powder are attacked better with narrow tires. For really deep and hard pack snow, wide flotation tires work better, just as they do in sand, provided you have the horses to turn them.

@Gleeman, you may want to consider this:

lh6.googleusercontent.com

// 4wheeling -offroad- in snow and ice for over 30 years
 
2014-02-05 06:44:52 PM  
At least he didn't do that to a relatively nice car.

img.fark.net
 
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