Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(BBC)   Fark food thread: "The rise of kimchi." Share your recipies   (bbc.co.uk ) divider line
    More: Cool, Ministry Of Agriculture, national symbols, boosting  
•       •       •

3060 clicks; posted to Main » on 04 Feb 2014 at 11:51 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



208 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | » | Last | Show all
 
2014-02-04 12:54:28 PM  
Anyone who says "I like kimchi" or "I don't like kimchi" has never been to Korea!

I have had maybe 100 delicious kinds of kimchi, and adozen nasty ones.

It's like saying "I love kimbap" or "I hate kimbap"- since the name doesn't imply any specific ingredient or method of preparation, it's a bit like saying "I hate all foods". (And no, not all kimchi is fermented.)
 
2014-02-04 12:55:35 PM  

Trik: you guys should ask Ariel Tweto for her walrus flipper recipe


Oh, man alive, she's still around?

Not that I'm complaining. She's adorable. I'm just saying, Wipeout isn't really the place you expect someone to get discovered.
 
2014-02-04 01:01:01 PM  
scontent-b-dfw.xx.fbcdn.net
 
2014-02-04 01:02:38 PM  
May add a bit of wine to my braised cabbage dinner tonight, just to give it a little twang.
Can't go full Kimchi

Braised cabbage:
Slice the cabbage into wedges, arrange in 9x12 baking dish. Stick with a few toothpicks to hold together the wedges
Drizzle with olive oil.
Add One sliced sweet onion to dish
Add two or three chopped carrots
Salt and fresh ground pepper.
Add 1/3 to 1/2 cup veg or chicken broth. Use a bit of dry white wine as well if you want
Cover tightly, 375 for 45-60 min.
Uncover and turn wedges over (if you can) if no liquid left you can add a little more to cover the bottom and cook for another 20 minutes until lightly browned.

Serve warm or cooled.
 
2014-02-04 01:03:29 PM  

tripleseven: AverageAmericanGuy: My favorite recipe:

Name: Kimchi
Ingredients:
* One jar of kimchi

Steps:
1. Open jar of kimchi
2. Use a fork or chopsticks to pull kimchi out of jar. Place kimchi on plate
3. Close jar tightly

Enjoy!

Similar to mine, except:

Steps:
1. Open jar of kimchi
2. Use a fork or chopsticks to pull kimchi out of jar. Stand in front of open fridge, and stuff kimchi down face.
3. Close jar tightly


I see you found the special ingredient in my secret recipe.
 
2014-02-04 01:04:30 PM  
I have been eating kimchi long before some pretentious foodies turned it into a fad food.  Long before Doctor Oz turned it into a superfood that will prevent disease as it is filled with beneficial bacteria.  Then again, I'm Korean, so I pretty much have it every day.
In fact, I had some earlier today, as it was my dad's birthday.  Well, an early celebration as it is snowing right now and well, driving is not going to be a biatch tomorrow.
 
2014-02-04 01:06:15 PM  

Speef: Anyone who says "I like kimchi" or "I don't like kimchi" has never been to Korea!

I have had maybe 100 delicious kinds of kimchi, and adozen nasty ones.

It's like saying "I love kimbap" or "I hate kimbap"- since the name doesn't imply any specific ingredient or method of preparation, it's a bit like saying "I hate all foods". (And no, not all kimchi is fermented.)


In fairness, even here, kimchi (without adjective) is assumed to be cabbage kimchi.  Add a word to get all the other types.  Technically, you are correct.

/although kimbab just means rice roll
 
2014-02-04 01:06:48 PM  
i just get these at this asian market near me.  i just follow the directions on the back.  works well so far.

ecx.images-amazon.com
and these too, even though its just flavoring.

img.fark.net
 
2014-02-04 01:07:35 PM  
I make my own using this recipe from Fine Cooking.
Gives me an excuse to make bulgogi. Otherwise, when you get home late and you don't feel like making a whole meal, adding kimchi to a bowl of rice and topped with a poached egg makes me a happy boy.
Oh, and when the kimchi gets really old and stinky, chopping it up to make kimchi fried rice.
 
2014-02-04 01:07:43 PM  
Replace Kimchi chili powder with Old Bay seasoning. Serve with sardines in mustard sauce. Eat outside, so it doesn't stink up the house. Awesome.
 
2014-02-04 01:08:39 PM  
SansNeural:
I also miss late-night-after-drinking food truck fare.

I haven't been to Korea in almost 20 years, and I still fantasize about the stuff from those fried-things pushcarts.  I think they put heroin in the breading.
 
2014-02-04 01:10:35 PM  

SansNeural: I also miss late-night-after-drinking food truck fare.


I remember stumbling out of a bar in Hongdae one night and getting street food from the guy who'd set up shop right in front of said bar, thinking, "This guy is a genius."
 
2014-02-04 01:10:41 PM  
Never had it, but always willing to try something new. I keep seeing people say they mix it with ramen. Would that be drained ramen noodles mixed with the kimchi, or mix it into the broth?
 
2014-02-04 01:11:19 PM  
I've tried using sriracha as a shortcut for homemade kimchi, since it's basically just chilies and garlic and fermentable sugars anyway.  Worked pretty well.

Would probably also work well with sambal oelek or any other prepared chili sauce.
 
2014-02-04 01:13:05 PM  
It's good stuff, and there are a lot of health benefits for probiotics and for eating cabbage and other veggies. However, don't eat a whole lot of it. There are very high rates of stomach and esophageal cancer in countries that eat a lot of fermented vegetables.

/make my own sauerkraut
 
2014-02-04 01:13:39 PM  

Speef: Anyone who says "I like kimchi" or "I don't like kimchi" has never been to Korea!

I have had maybe 100 delicious kinds of kimchi, and adozen nasty ones.

It's like saying "I love kimbap" or "I hate kimbap"- since the name doesn't imply any specific ingredient or method of preparation, it's a bit like saying "I hate all foods". (And no, not all kimchi is fermented.)


No, saying "I hate/love XXX type of food"  and "I hate/love all foods" are not the same at all.  I get your point but you made it poorly.
 
2014-02-04 01:16:53 PM  

BravadoGT: [i62.tinypic.com image 850x680]


I tried to post this but it said the file was too big....

/cornering the coleslaw market
 
2014-02-04 01:25:37 PM  
I cook a ton of Korean food. But when it comes to good old fashioned cabbage kimchi my recipe is the same all the time.

1) Pick up phone
2) Dial Mother in Law
3) Beg furiously for her to send me kimchi
D) Thank her and wait for the mail to arrive a couple days later

Gatdamn that woman makes the best kimchee!


Also Whoever upthread mentioned Kimchee Jigae you go to hell and go now! Now it is all I want for lunch and I get to have a salad from Wal MArt
 
2014-02-04 01:26:06 PM  
For those who tried it and hated it -- you very well may have eaten some that was made by a n00b and not an experienced kimchi chef.  Try it again, but on an Asian buffet...you will se the difference.

Kimchi, made properly, does NOT taste bad.  Yes, it's fermented but fermented does not need to taste bad if someone knows what they are doing.

ANYONE WANTING TO LOSE WEIGHT:  This stuff is a godsend!  It's very tasty, extremely low in calories, no fat, almost no carbs, and is a bowl of spicy, crunchy, awesomeness that you can eat all day and still lose weight.  As an experiment I tried it and had it for two meals a day -- eating all I wanted, and lost 25 pounds in about 4 months.  Now, I crave the stuff.

Mine I made at home was ok...but not stellar.  I made a deal with the owner of the Chinese Buffet in town and buy it a gallon at a time.   Nom, nom, nom,nom,nom.
 
2014-02-04 01:27:48 PM  
A food thread on a Tuesday?  And a theme I've never tried preparing?  Cool.  Bring on the recipes. Got the copy/paste fingers all loosened up.

Took the youngest to a Korean place in town and she wouldn't order anything she couldn't recognize.  She got the bulgogi and I had bibimbap with the extra hot kimchi.  She tasted out of my bowl and graciously decided I could go ahead and enjoy the rest of it.
 
2014-02-04 01:27:50 PM  

phlegmmo: What's a recipie?



It's kimchi baked into a flaky crust.
 
2014-02-04 01:30:29 PM  
I hate cabbage.  Vile weed.

However there is a type of non-cabbage kimchi I enjoy and that's the one made with white radish.
 
2014-02-04 01:31:03 PM  

missmez: Speef: No, saying "I hate/love XXX type of food"  and "I hate/love all foods" are not the same at all.  I get your point but you made it poorly.


 Obviously they're not the same. The difference arises from the fact that kimchi is not one type of food; it can contain anything and be made a jillion ways. Maybe an easier-to-understand analagy would be "I love/hate sandwiches", though that doesn't really work, since one might assume that the speaker likes/dislikes bread.
 
2014-02-04 01:31:19 PM  
I like kimchi but not sauerkraut.  I think it's because the spiciness overpowers the texture.

Kimchi is another of those things like Cincinnati chili or Rush, in that there is absolutely NO middle ground.  You either really, really like it, or you really, REALLY, REALLY hate it.

/Seoul Garden in Cuyahoga Falls FTW
 
2014-02-04 01:33:23 PM  

sovietski: The Irresponsible Captain: I tried it... It was good, but then I love Sauerkraut. A vinegar slaw and fries on your sandwich is good as well.

I am also a fan of sauerkraut, alone and on brats. Smothered in spicy mustard.

I've yet to try kimchi. There seem to be 2 opinions of those I have polled who've tried it:
1) OMG TEH YUCK
2) OMG TEH YUM

I'll have to try it, methinks.

/German
//likes German food
///mmmmm red cabbage



Personally, I'm generally a fan of fermented foods but just haven't found a kimchi that I can stomach.
I'm willing to try it again but am in no hurry to do so.
 
2014-02-04 01:33:24 PM  

Kygz: fark kimchi, they serve that shiat even for breakfast


Yeah, it's good. My usual breakfast is a cup of black rice with two poached eggs and a cup of kimchee all mixed up. Quick and easy!
 
2014-02-04 01:33:36 PM  
I think "classic" kimchi is made with a paste of rice flour, but I almost never have that around.  This "quickie" kimchi is pretty good though:

Cut one head of napa cabbage into pieces so it will all fit into a big bowl.  Add water to cover the cabbage and add between 1/4 cup and 1/2 cup of salt.  Mix well and allow to soak for at least two hours.  Soak longer if you like it, I usually forget about it until much later.  Drain cabbage and rinse well.

Make paste from 1/4-1/2 cup korean red pepper flakes, 1/4 cup of fish sauce (or less), 1 tablespoon of sugar, and warm water until it is stirrable.  Add 3-4 sliced green onions, a handful of shredded carrot, and several good tablespoons of minced garlic.  You can add greens if you like, I have had good success with mustard greens and collard greens (shut up).  Mix the vegetables and the paste with the cabbage and mix until it's all coated.

Place the mixture into a sealable bowl, and press down to make sure the cabbage is all packed together as you add it.  Seal the top, and leave it at room temperature for 24 hours.  Taste after that.  If it tastes good, put it in the refrigerator and enjoy.  If it's not fermented enough for you, leave it out longer, and repeat the taste test.
 
2014-02-04 01:33:41 PM  

eyeq360: I have been eating kimchi long before some pretentious foodies turned it into a fad food.  Long before Doctor Oz turned it into a superfood that will prevent disease as it is filled with beneficial bacteria.  Then again, I'm Korean, so I pretty much have it every day.
In fact, I had some earlier today, as it was my dad's birthday.  Well, an early celebration as it is snowing right now and well, driving is not going to be a biatch tomorrow.


I'll be stopping by next time I go through your area.

Loucifer: Replace Kimchi chili powder with Old Bay seasoning. Serve with sardines in mustard sauce. Eat outside, so it doesn't stink up the house. Awesome.


Is that a joke? Because I actually think that sounds interesting.
 
2014-02-04 01:38:14 PM  

Huggermugger: It's good stuff, and there are a lot of health benefits for probiotics and for eating cabbage and other veggies. However, don't eat a whole lot of it. There are very high rates of stomach and esophageal cancer in countries that eat a lot of fermented vegetables.

/make my own sauerkraut


there's there is this on aldehydes produced in food fermentation...

http://oneradionetwork.com/latest/risks-and-benefits-of-fermented-foo d s-consumption-article/

I knew my love of fermented food would bite me in the ass...or stomach.

/I used to avoid aldehydes when I brewed ale at home
 
2014-02-04 01:38:21 PM  

mistrmind: CygnusDarius: Apparently vegan kimchi exists.

Vegan?  The black-sheep of eaters.


Well, what sauce goes well with mutton?.
 
2014-02-04 01:47:03 PM  

RexTalionis: Clemkadidlefark: First Rule of Kimchi: Don't

It's not significantly different or taste weirder than sauerkraut on hot dogs.


In fact, that's one of the best uses for it, besides eating straight.

Even better if one of these:

www.onlyfromhawaii.com
 
2014-02-04 01:52:19 PM  
The best I've had in Maryland is the kimchi made fresh in the H Mart Asian supermarkets.  Cucumber is best, but the cabbage is very good too.  Wouldn't think of buying canned any longer.
 
2014-02-04 01:53:45 PM  

flux: I had kielbasa on a roll with kimchi and red cabbage slaw for dinner last night.

Kimchi goes in my bloody mary, too, when I'm the one making them.


I never thought of Kimchi in bloddy mary. Now I have to try that!

People putting down kimchi sound like they are not aware of the differnt types of kimchi that exist. It's not all spicy or pungent, but the spicy pungent stuff is awesome. I made some water kimchi that turned out great and used the liquid to make dongchimi gooksu. Turned out amazing. Took recipe from a website.

I love how foodie is the go-to insult in fark food threads where hipster would be in fark music threads.
 
2014-02-04 01:53:55 PM  

whip-me-beat-me: Kimchi or can be spelled Kim-Chee, which is how its spelled where I live. Kim-Chee is not spelled Kimchi in any eating establishment or store bought Kim-Chee. Dumb Americans.


Ah, so you're trolling.

http://www.google.com/trends/explore#q=%2Fm%2F018dz_%2C%20kim-chi%2C %2 0kimchee%2C%20kim-chee&cmpt=q

noblepig.com
www.cestlavegan.com
steamykitchen.com
www.ramenplace.com
www.asianfoodgrocer.com

Shall I go on?
 
2014-02-04 01:56:37 PM  

BravadoGT: [i62.tinypic.com image 850x680]


Beat me to it
 
2014-02-04 01:58:21 PM  

rockradio1: Try it again, but on an Asian buffet...


...AND you've outed yourself. Nobody who knows anything about actual Asian food says the word buffet, except as an insult.
 
2014-02-04 01:59:42 PM  
Everybody makes fermented food. Why is there such a specific highlight on kimchi?

We have fermented cucumber and call them pickles (eat them with sandwiches). West Europe has sauerkraut (eat with everything). India has achars and chutneys (eat with everything). The middle east market has half an isle of fermented vegetables section (almost as big as the olives section).

Technically, yogurt and chocolate are also fermented foods.
 
2014-02-04 01:59:54 PM  

Gosling: Trik: you guys should ask Ariel Tweto for her walrus flipper recipe

Oh, man alive, she's still around?

Not that I'm complaining. She's adorable. I'm just saying, Wipeout isn't really the place you expect someone to get discovered.


Only place I've seen her is Craig Ferguson a few times and on Letterman once

And yes she is adorable in a chatterbox mini tsunami kinda way

She eats some questionable foods though
 
2014-02-04 02:01:24 PM  

gweilo8888: ...AND you've outed yourself. Nobody who knows anything about actual Asian food says the word buffet, except as an insult.


I don't know.   In Asia, you can get pretty damn good food at a buffet.  It's a pretty common upscale restaurant type in Korea, at least.
 
2014-02-04 02:01:35 PM  
Variants on pickled (i.e. preserved) cabbage and other veggies are universal.  (And by "universal," I only mean the galactic boundaries, as maintained by the Federation.)  Picked up a jar of a mustard/vinegar-based product with the "Slawsa" label in the grocery store recently that's pretty tasty.  Made in Tennessee.

/I think Tennessee is still within those boundaries maintained by Starship Command...
 
2014-02-04 02:02:12 PM  
My current:

3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2014-02-04 02:06:53 PM  

TheShavingofOccam123: Sure...


You'll note I never claimed it wasn't spelled that way. Really, I was only aiming to disprove this claim:

"Kim-Chee is not spelled Kimchi in any eating establishment or store bought Kim-Chee."

As I showed, plenty of store-bought kimchi (in fact, most, in my experience) is spelled kimchi. And the same is true of kimchi on a menu, although it's not typically listed on the menu in Korean restaurants because banchan are brought to the table without needing to be ordered in most establishments.)

As for "dumb-ass Americans", if anything, "kim-chee" is a backwards American spelling. I grew up in Asia, and have lived on three continents. I am aware there is no "correct" spelling of a transliterated word, but kimchi is far and away the most common spelling, and if there's anywhere that "kim-chee" seems particularly popular, it's America.
 
2014-02-04 02:10:31 PM  

redrumten: I never thought of Kimchi in bloddy mary. Now I have to try that!


I snagged it from Tasty n' Sons in Portland, OR, which has a hell of a mary menu. My go-to is the Lady Vengeance: old overholt rye, tomato, kimchi juice, lime and fish sauce with chili salt on the rim and a big skewer of kimchi on top of the glass. I usually make my bloody mary with gin, but I might start making them with rye to see if I can get the same results at home.
 
2014-02-04 02:11:51 PM  

Skleenar: I don't know.   In Asia, you can get pretty damn good food at a buffet.  It's a pretty common upscale restaurant type in Korea, at least.


They exist, sure, but I wouldn't call them "upscale". They can certainly be tastier than they are here, though.

/only great buffet I've ever had isn't what you'd call a buffet in the traditional sense of the word. It's a Korean BBQ place on Sai Yeung Choi St. in Hong Kong, where most of what's on the buffet is raw, kept properly cold, and in proper Korean BBQ style you cook it yourself.
//and the reason it works is because you cook it yourself
///buffets fail in general because the food is either luke-warm, dried-out, or both. You can't keep cooked food at a proper serving temperature for any length of time without ruining it, and buffets ruin cooked food.
 
2014-02-04 02:12:33 PM  
Mmmm.....Kimchi.  It was my favorite part about living in Korea.  So many different varieties.  My favorite is the radish Kimchi.  I like Kimchi that is slightly sweet also.  I had some delivered mail order once from Hmart and the neighbors called me saying there was a "something dead" smell coming from my house.
 
2014-02-04 02:21:55 PM  

gweilo8888: TheShavingofOccam123: Sure...

You'll note I never claimed it wasn't spelled that way. Really, I was only aiming to disprove this claim:

"Kim-Chee is not spelled Kimchi in any eating establishment or store bought Kim-Chee."

As I showed, plenty of store-bought kimchi (in fact, most, in my experience) is spelled kimchi. And the same is true of kimchi on a menu, although it's not typically listed on the menu in Korean restaurants because banchan are brought to the table without needing to be ordered in most establishments.)

As for "dumb-ass Americans", if anything, "kim-chee" is a backwards American spelling. I grew up in Asia, and have lived on three continents. I am aware there is no "correct" spelling of a transliterated word, but kimchi is far and away the most common spelling, and if there's anywhere that "kim-chee" seems particularly popular, it's America.


It's not just spelling we Americans fark up. We slaughter French. Forte, as an example.

/there was a native French speaker on Jeopardy who pronounced "Bastille" correctly. The judges had to stop tape and sort it out.
 
2014-02-04 02:22:40 PM  

Rosyna: mistrmind: And what is everyone's feelings on sauerkraut?   Really a European version of kimchi.

Except for the chili. And fish.

But other than that, yeah, it's exactly identical...


The chili and the fish are the good part.
 
2014-02-04 02:30:25 PM  
Not all kimchi has to be pickled this and that.

2 bags spinach leaves
sesame seeds
sesame oil
water
pot
strainer
paper towels
closed container (like Tupperware)

1. Boil water in pot.
2. Dump spinach into water.
3. Leave in pot until the water is boiling again.
4. As soon as the pot is boiling again, dump contents of pot into strainer (obviously over something that you can dump water into like a sink).
5. Take 4 paper towels (double if they're thin) and place spinach into 4 divided sections onto each towel (so 1/4 of contents per paper towel).
6. Fold paper towel over spinach.
7. Over sink again, press paper towel with hands on each side. Basically you are wringing the remaining water out of the spinach. Repeat for all 4.
8. Place all spinach into container.
9. Apply sesame oil (about a tsp. A little goes a long way).
10. Add sesame seeds.
11. Close container.
12. Shake.
13. Serve.

Can be served immediately or stored. Can be served at room temp. Also note the consistency of boiled spinach is nothing like the dry leaves that you started with. It'll be "stringy." Goes great on bulgogi with some gochujang.

/Still likes radish, cabbage and cucumber pickled kimchis.
//Yet hates regular dill pickles. Go figure.
 
2014-02-04 02:31:08 PM  
Straight from the jar. I also like pickled red cabbage, especially the stuff my mum used to make.
 
2014-02-04 02:34:48 PM  
I get kimchi at the local Korean supermarket. I found that the American-made kimchi in the organic section at the grocery is an abomination. Kimchi is great on a tuna salad sandwich.
 
Displayed 50 of 208 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter






In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report