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(WXOW La Crosse)   And now a reminder to keep your faucets running during cold Wisconsin nights...Keep your faucets running during the cold Wisconsin nights   (wxow.com) divider line 44
    More: PSA, WXOW  
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4727 clicks; posted to Main » on 03 Feb 2014 at 4:58 PM (46 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



44 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-02-03 04:39:37 PM  
Sounds like a country song. "Keep your faucets running...during those...cold...Wisconsin...niiiiights..."
 
2014-02-03 04:44:41 PM  
Is that the deep-cut Python reference I think it is? Well played, submitter
 
2014-02-03 05:08:24 PM  
Put on your cheese hat to avoid brain freeze.
 
2014-02-03 05:13:54 PM  
As a guy who just relocated to Wisconsin, I have to say: I'm freezing Menards off!
 
2014-02-03 05:13:58 PM  
Keep your faucets running during the cold Wisconsin nights.
 
2014-02-03 05:17:50 PM  

Private_Citizen: As a guy who just relocated to Wisconsin, I have to say: I'm freezing Menards off!


But at least you're saving big money!
 
2014-02-03 05:18:33 PM  
That's unbelievable. I'd understand the suggestion to leave taps running in Georgia or Texas, but... Wisconsin? Do they not bury their pipes deep enough (that sounded like innuendo, didn't it?)?
 
2014-02-03 05:19:40 PM  

Private_Citizen: As a guy who just relocated to Wisconsin, I have to say: I'm freezing Menards off!


From a lifelong Wisconsin resident to a newbie: well played, you sir won a free spotted cow of we ever get the chance to meet...
 
2014-02-03 05:19:44 PM  
i208.photobucket.com
 
2014-02-03 05:28:05 PM  

menschenfresser: That's unbelievable. I'd understand the suggestion to leave taps running in Georgia or Texas, but... Wisconsin? Do they not bury their pipes deep enough (that sounded like innuendo, didn't it?)?


Without actually researching it, I would expect that in the affected areas there is little snow cover.  The snow insulates quite well so the frost never gets too deep.  Combine low snow cover with unusually cold weather and the frost can go much deeper than normal.
 
2014-02-03 05:33:56 PM  
Are we talking:
Drip.....drip.....drip
Or
Drip, drip, drip
Or
Continuos very small stream?


/has lived in extremely cold weather
//the townhouse in the middle of the row FTW
 
2014-02-03 05:35:48 PM  

menschenfresser: That's unbelievable. I'd understand the suggestion to leave taps running in Georgia or Texas, but... Wisconsin? Do they not bury their pipes deep enough (that sounded like innuendo, didn't it?)?


Up here in Wisconsin, we bury our pipes EXTRA deep.

ahem... but with temperatures approaching absolute zero on some nights, even water mains buried six feet deep are freezing and breaking.
 
2014-02-03 05:42:20 PM  
Who doesn't know this?
 
2014-02-03 05:44:00 PM  

BigBooper: ahem... but with temperatures approaching absolute zero on some nights, even water mains buried six feet deep are freezing and breaking.


o_O
 
2014-02-03 05:50:36 PM  

gopher321: BigBooper: ahem... but with temperatures approaching absolute zero on some nights, even water mains buried six feet deep are freezing and breaking.

o_O


You should see it on the nights when it gets so cold that the atmosphere liquefies!
 
2014-02-03 05:51:01 PM  
I always wondered about the water freezing in the drain. Once the drain is plugged with ice, your residence will fill with water.

Its not like rivers and streams don't freeze...
 
2014-02-03 05:56:31 PM  

SoundOfOneHandWanking: I always wondered about the water freezing in the drain. Once the drain is plugged with ice, your residence will fill with water.

Its not like rivers and streams don't freeze...


Septic systems freeze up in Wisconsin too. I let the grass grow tall over mine for that reason.
 
2014-02-03 05:57:10 PM  

Mr. Eugenides: gopher321: BigBooper: ahem... but with temperatures approaching absolute zero on some nights, even water mains buried six feet deep are freezing and breaking.

o_O

You should see it on the nights when it gets so cold that the atmosphere liquefies!


Well not quite that bad, but you remember those scenes in The Day After Tomorrow where everything flash freezes? Yea, something like that; only it happens over a whole night.

/We should have listened!!!!!
 
2014-02-03 05:57:35 PM  

SoundOfOneHandWanking: I always wondered about the water freezing in the drain. Once the drain is plugged with ice, your residence will fill with water.

Its not like rivers and streams don't freeze...


Drains tend to be a bit warmer due to some of the non-water stuff in there. And drain lines stand up to obstructions better... again, due to some of the non-water stuff that goes down there.
 
2014-02-03 06:12:39 PM  
I'm amazed that they are giving water credit for that.  A small waste comparatively to solve a lot of potential headaches.  Good on them!
 
2014-02-03 06:15:49 PM  

BigBooper: menschenfresser: That's unbelievable. I'd understand the suggestion to leave taps running in Georgia or Texas, but... Wisconsin? Do they not bury their pipes deep enough (that sounded like innuendo, didn't it?)?

Up here in Wisconsin, we bury our pipes EXTRA deep.

ahem... but with temperatures approaching absolute zero on some nights, even water mains buried six feet deep are freezing and breaking.


That's because your water mains are probably old and need replacing like Flint's water mains.

As for folks needing to run their taps, it has more to do with the pipes coming out of the ground to supply the house.  Not all house have their water pipes under ground, like trailers.  I had a pipe froze because a shower over hangs the foundation a couple feet and since having the over hanging floor space insulated from the basement, the insulation kept the pipe from being kept warm from the heat that used to escape.  So, I pulled the insulation back a little to purposely allow heat to escape and keep the water flowing.

It was weird watching the local news earlier.  They did a story on the CA drought that may affect food supply and just as they finished saying how terrible the drought is, they remind us to run the taps and the water company will issue credits.
 
2014-02-03 06:21:16 PM  

lack of warmth: It was weird watching the local news earlier.  They did a story on the CA drought that may affect food supply and just as they finished saying how terrible the drought is, they remind us to run the taps and the water company will issue credits.


Yeah, but you don't get your tap or irrigation water out of the Sierra Nevada snow pack.
Our drought is going to fark everyone up.
 
2014-02-03 06:21:35 PM  

BigBooper: Mr. Eugenides: gopher321: BigBooper: ahem... but with temperatures approaching absolute zero on some nights, even water mains buried six feet deep are freezing and breaking.

o_O

You should see it on the nights when it gets so cold that the atmosphere liquefies!

Well not quite that bad, but you remember those scenes in The Day After Tomorrow where everything flash freezes? Yea, something like that; only it happens over a whole night.

/We should have listened!!!!!


That's what I should do if snowed in Tuesday: a couple of Xanaax, a shot of NyQuil, and watch The Day After Tomorrow.

I always suspected that movie would be good with the right mix of drugs.

If I see a puddle of oxygen on the floor I'll know I took too much.
 
2014-02-03 06:24:25 PM  

seansimonson: Private_Citizen: As a guy who just relocated to Wisconsin, I have to say: I'm freezing Menards off!

From a lifelong Wisconsin resident to a newbie: well played, you sir won a free spotted cow of we ever get the chance to meet...


A spotted cow and a pint of bull semen from that fridge on the right near the entrance. You'll need both to start making cheese.
 
2014-02-03 06:26:58 PM  

seansimonson: Private_Citizen: As a guy who just relocated to Wisconsin, I have to say: I'm freezing Menards off!

From a lifelong Wisconsin resident to a newbie: well played, you sir won a free spotted cow of we ever get the chance to meet...


Having recently moved back to Minnesota, I must say that I cry; not being able to pop down to Casonova's in Hudson & full my Growler full of tasty, tasty Spotted Cow!
 
2014-02-03 06:34:23 PM  

crotchgrabber: lack of warmth: It was weird watching the local news earlier.  They did a story on the CA drought that may affect food supply and just as they finished saying how terrible the drought is, they remind us to run the taps and the water company will issue credits.

Yeah, but you don't get your tap or irrigation water out of the Sierra Nevada snow pack.
Our drought is going to fark everyone up.


You don't say.  You mean they don't pump the entire nations' water supply from the same pipe my water comes from?

/sarcasm
 
2014-02-03 06:49:05 PM  
Couple more suggestions for folks not used to this.

1. Use the tub tap if your drains are slow, less worry of accedental overflow, better yet a basement hose direct to sewer.

2. If it does freeze it is most likly frozen at the foundation - the ground may pull away from the foundation leaving some uninsated space. Some folks water and tamp, others lime, really depends on your soil.

3. Snow Cover - It's insulation, if your waterline runs under a new deck it may not be getting the same insulation it used too, good idea to insulate ...

4. Wet towels heated in an oven placed around the pipe entrance may help thaw in the early stages

5. Buy a DBH thawing machine and earn enough on the weekends to take the summers off.
 
2014-02-03 07:06:39 PM  

Greylight: Couple more suggestions for folks not used to this.

1. Use the tub tap if your drains are slow, less worry of accedental overflow, better yet a basement hose direct to sewer.

2. If it does freeze it is most likly frozen at the foundation - the ground may pull away from the foundation leaving some uninsated space. Some folks water and tamp, others lime, really depends on your soil.

3. Snow Cover - It's insulation, if your waterline runs under a new deck it may not be getting the same insulation it used too, good idea to insulate ...

4. Wet towels heated in an oven placed around the pipe entrance may help thaw in the early stages

5. Buy a DBH thawing machine and earn enough on the weekends to take the summers off.


No mention of the blow torch in the crawl space method?
 
2014-02-03 07:19:08 PM  

IRQ12: Greylight: Couple more suggestions for folks not used to this.

1. Use the tub tap if your drains are slow, less worry of accedental overflow, better yet a basement hose direct to sewer.

2. If it does freeze it is most likly frozen at the foundation - the ground may pull away from the foundation leaving some uninsated space. Some folks water and tamp, others lime, really depends on your soil.

3. Snow Cover - It's insulation, if your waterline runs under a new deck it may not be getting the same insulation it used too, good idea to insulate ...

4. Wet towels heated in an oven placed around the pipe entrance may help thaw in the early stages

5. Buy a DBH thawing machine and earn enough on the weekends to take the summers off.

No mention of the blow torch in the crawl space method?


Well ya, that will get the water running again but I was only working with the suggestions that had a good chance of leaving you with a house to enjoy the indoor plumbing.

/will not ever reference a tiger torch for frozen pipes. DBH all the way.
 
2014-02-03 07:45:54 PM  
And they vant to put the licence fee up?!
 
2014-02-03 08:44:22 PM  

BigBooper: menschenfresser: That's unbelievable. I'd understand the suggestion to leave taps running in Georgia or Texas, but... Wisconsin? Do they not bury their pipes deep enough (that sounded like innuendo, didn't it?)?

Up here in Wisconsin, we bury our pipes EXTRA deep.

ahem... but with temperatures approaching absolute zero on some nights, even water mains buried six feet deep are freezing and breaking.


Living in Canada, I have to say... I really don't understand why this is an issue in Wisconsin.  Sure, we get occasional pipe bursts during cold weather, but never have I ever heard of a directive like this.  Aren't water mains buried deep enough?  Are houses not properly insulated?  Are water lines not kept to internal walls and away from cold zones?  Are shutoff valves and meters not inside the heat envelope of the structure?

These are all pretty standard urban infrastructure and building practices for cold weather living.  It's mind boggling that you could live somewhere where it freezes regularly and still have widespread issues.
 
2014-02-03 08:48:57 PM  
Can't believe how many people in my town spend thousands to clean up after burst pipes... but never thought to attach the $2 styrofoam faucet domes on the outside taps in the fall..
 
2014-02-03 09:20:47 PM  

unyon: Living in Canada, I have to say... I really don't understand why this is an issue in Wisconsin.  Sure, we get occasional pipe bursts during cold weather, but never have I ever heard of a directive like this.  Aren't water mains buried deep enough?  Are houses not properly insulated?  Are water lines not kept to internal walls and away from cold zones?  Are shutoff valves and meters not inside the heat envelope of the structure?

These are all pretty standard urban infrastructure and building practices for cold weather living.  It's mind boggling that you could live somewhere where it freezes regularly and still have widespread issues.


Maybe it's a city thing, out in the boonies we'd put straw over the septic field but never left the water on.
 
2014-02-03 09:38:36 PM  
Cadillac (Michigan) issues run-water notice for entire city
By Rick Charmoli
CADILLAC - The Cadillac Utilities Department has issued a run-water notice for the entire city until further notice.
The department monitors frost levels in various manholes throughout the city, and at this time, it has determined that the  order is necessary due to the depth of the frost. As a result, officials with the department are requesting that a small, pencil lead-sized stream be allowed to run continuously. A rate of one gallon per 15 minutes is recommended.
Even though the outside temperature may rise above freezing, the frost that has been driven into the ground will still be there until spring. Residents should run their water until the city issues a stop notice.
The city will base billing on average usage in November and December.  Any water and sewer used above this average will be adjusted in the next billing cycle. If a customer's water runs at a rate of one gallon for every 15 minutes, the utility bill, which is a combination of water and sewer charges, it will increase a total of $14.12.
Because residents may run the water at a higher rate, the city will adjust the water bills by a maximum of $18.
For more information or to ask questions, contact the utility depart
 
2014-02-03 09:49:15 PM  
You can thaw those pipes, but you're still in Wisconsin....
 
2014-02-03 10:36:01 PM  

unyon: Living in Canada, I have to say... I really don't understand why this is an issue in Wisconsin.  Sure, we get occasional pipe bursts during cold weather, but never have I ever heard of a directive like this.  Aren't water mains buried deep enough?  Are houses not properly insulated?  Are water lines not kept to internal walls and away from cold zones?  Are shutoff valves and meters not inside the heat envelope of the structure?

These are all pretty standard urban infrastructure and building practices for cold weather living.  It's mind boggling that you could live somewhere where it freezes regularly and still have widespread issues.


Until your post I didn't really think about the depth of the frost line.  Our normal code for getting below the frost line is 42", and I think the building code in your area is deeper.  Being that we are getting temps that is usually north of most Canadians' dwellings, I would guess the frost line is dropping below our normal.  That could be the reason why water mains would be at risk.

To add, the pipe in a lot of homes has to climb above the frost line to get into the home, especially those with their own wells.  I'm lucky, my line comes in below my basement.  I just have to worry about the pipes in other parts of the house.
 
2014-02-03 10:41:38 PM  
BunkoSquad probably has it: Leave your television on during the night.
 
2014-02-04 02:08:25 AM  
But...but...but.... think of the poor salmon in California who won't have enough water to spawn this year!
 
2014-02-04 06:30:04 AM  
But...but...but.... think of the poor salmon in California who won't have enough water to spawn this year!

They should come to Wisconsin, then.
 
2014-02-04 09:10:20 AM  

lack of warmth: Until your post I didn't really think about the depth of the frost line.  Our normal code for getting below the frost line is 42", and I think the building code in your area is deeper.  Being that we are getting temps that is usually north of most Canadians' dwellings, I would guess the frost line is dropping below our normal.  That could be the reason why water mains would be at risk.


Incredible.  Here (Alberta) I believe code depth is in the neighbourhood of 2m (~6.5').  Water lines, including well lines, enter structures at the lowest point in basements, which is commonly that 2m below grade.  I was looking at a frost depth chart, and at the Canada/US border below Manitoba/SW corner of Ontario, the potential frost depth is measured at 2.5m.  So you guys should actually be putting your pipes deeper than we put ours.  Although, as you point out, the basement floor of a structure is about as low as one can reasonably go.

To add, the pipe in a lot of homes has to climb above the frost line to get into the home, especially those with their own wells.  I'm lucky, my line comes in below my basement.  I just have to worry about the pipes in other parts of the house.

Again, code here prevents water (or even sewer) from being run in outside walls, for just this reason.  It genuinely surprises me that it's not the same in your jurisdiction.

If I lived where you did, every pipe that had a chance at freezing would be wrapped with heat tape, just like they do with pipeline sections that come above ground.
 
2014-02-04 11:39:33 AM  

menschenfresser: That's unbelievable. I'd understand the suggestion to leave taps running in Georgia or Texas, but... Wisconsin? Do they not bury their pipes deep enough (that sounded like innuendo, didn't it?)?


You bet we do
 
2014-02-04 11:42:53 AM  

gopher321: BigBooper: ahem... but with temperatures approaching absolute zero on some nights, even water mains buried six feet deep are freezing and breaking.

o_O


in his defense, if the temp is going down you are "approaching" absolute zero.

In the same way that when I drive from Madison to Milwaukee I am approaching Boston.

ok that was a terrible defense :)
 
2014-02-04 11:45:45 AM  

girlygirlmpls: You can thaw those pipes, but you're still in Wisconsin....


True but at  least we know how to play Duck Duck goose properly :)
 
2014-02-04 02:24:55 PM  
I read this headline in the voice of John Cleese
 
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