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(The Newspaper)   ACLU and EFF sue LAPD over ALPR   (thenewspaper.com ) divider line
    More: Interesting, ACLU, LAPD, Electronic Freedom Foundation  
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3695 clicks; posted to Main » on 03 Feb 2014 at 2:34 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-02-03 03:48:11 PM  
2 votes:
"We have also argued... that the only way to have an informed public debate about appropriate limits on ALPRs is through greater transparency about how the technology is actually being used"

If the police are using a tool without supervision, you can safely assume they are abusing it in the worst ways possible.
2014-02-03 03:26:39 PM  
2 votes:

CruiserTwelve: So far the only use I've seen for license plate readers has been good.


Which TFA says is 0.0005 percent of the usage.

it's impossible for the cops to track a random person's movements unless they specifically sought to track their movements.

Hardly. The system tracks plates, times and locations and records them in a database. See a hot chick drive down the street? Just type in the plate and you can find a driving pattern. She usually drives to Five Guys for lunch on Wednesdays, etc. Perfect way to set up a "pat down for weapons."

Since there's no oversight and no accountability, there's nothing to keep that from happening.
2014-02-03 04:46:25 PM  
1 vote:

Taxcheat: CruiserTwelve: Why would a cop need to establish a driving pattern to engage in bad behavior?

How about we put every cop car's movements on a live Google map for everyone to watch? That way, you know, we can tell when an officer is goofing off.

After all, there's no expectation of privacy in public, especially in a vehicle paid for and maintained at public expense.


To quote the cops themselves, "If you're not doing anything wrong, what do you have to worry about?"
2014-02-03 04:32:41 PM  
1 vote:

CruiserTwelve: Why would a cop need to establish a driving pattern to engage in bad behavior?


How about we put every cop car's movements on a live Google map for everyone to watch? That way, you know, we can tell when an officer is goofing off.

After all, there's no expectation of privacy in public, especially in a vehicle paid for and maintained at public expense.
2014-02-03 04:10:52 PM  
1 vote:

CruiserTwelve: There are laws to prevent that from happening.


Are they anything like the laws that supposedly keep police from violating traffic laws when they're not on a call?  Because those work like a charm, let me tell you.
2014-02-03 03:42:36 PM  
1 vote:
I have no problem with them reading the plates and seeing if they are flagged for some reason - same thing cops on the street do every day.  I DO have a problem with them keeping all the data on all the plates they read for extended periods of time, especially if they refuse to reveal anything about what they do (or want to do) with that saved data.  No legitimate reason for the government to keep it for more than a few days.
2014-02-03 03:35:23 PM  
1 vote:

CruiserTwelve: something anyone standing on a street corner could do.


Yeah, except:
a) No one does.
b) And if someone did, how long do you think it would take before DHS got involved?

The difference is the police are doing it. It's not just "anyone."
2014-02-03 03:23:00 PM  
1 vote:

geekbikerskum: In before "But out in public, you have no right to privacy."

That's as may be, but I think we as a society need to rethink what that means.  It used to be that the primary risk from being "out in public" came from being unlucky and having someone see you emerging from a porno theater, or happening to observe your car parked outside your mistress's house, or something.  Or you had to already be the target of a police investigation for some reason.  If you weren't already under investigation or the victim of some bad luck, your movements were pretty well anonymous.

The ability to amass large amounts of data on the movements of ordinary citizens and sift through that data is unprecedented, and drastically reduces if not eliminates the notion of anonymity in public spaces.


"Reasonable expectation of privacy" would work just fine if dumbarse judges would actually think about what's reasonable. No one expects to not be occasionally photographed while out and about. But NO ONE would think someone tracking your every movement is reasonable. Just because you can occasionally be photographed in public doesn't make ALL photographing in public reasonable. It's incredibly stupid how one has been applied to the other.  You can prove it experimentally pretty easily. Go to a mall, pick out a random person and follow them around pointing a camera at them. I guaranteeyou that they will call the police at some point. No one thinks that's reasonable.
2014-02-03 03:00:27 PM  
1 vote:
Hey, LAPD, DIAF.
2014-02-03 02:48:35 PM  
1 vote:

geekbikerskum: The ability to amass large amounts of data on the movements of ordinary citizens and sift through that data is unprecedented, and drastically reduces if not eliminates the notion of anonymity in public spaces.


It's also government's wet dream.  It's herd management and we're the herd.  They're not going to stop.
2014-02-03 02:44:50 PM  
1 vote:
In before "But out in public, you have no right to privacy."

That's as may be, but I think we as a society need to rethink what that means.  It used to be that the primary risk from being "out in public" came from being unlucky and having someone see you emerging from a porno theater, or happening to observe your car parked outside your mistress's house, or something.  Or you had to already be the target of a police investigation for some reason.  If you weren't already under investigation or the victim of some bad luck, your movements were pretty well anonymous.

The ability to amass large amounts of data on the movements of ordinary citizens and sift through that data is unprecedented, and drastically reduces if not eliminates the notion of anonymity in public spaces.
 
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