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(Popular Science)   Turns out the cure for cancer may have been right above our heads all along. Way, waaaaaaay above our heads   (popsci.com) divider line 18
    More: Interesting, cure for cancer, cancers, Federation of American Scientists, magnification, The FASEB Journal  
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5785 clicks; posted to Geek » on 03 Feb 2014 at 9:59 AM (51 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



18 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-02-03 09:45:30 AM  
Oh god that was a terrible movie. The aliens are your father and you recorded days of static. WTF.
 
2014-02-03 10:06:53 AM  
Alas, as much fun as it would be to needle a person about this development, they have left fark altogether.

Also, damnit headlinemitter, this is not a cure for cancer. This is a clue for another potential treatment. Please stop embodying this SMBC comic:

www.smbc-comics.com
 
2014-02-03 10:21:00 AM  
Approves.

i1.ytimg.com


/too obscure?
 
2014-02-03 10:49:59 AM  
I don't understand. What are the practical implications to this?
 
2014-02-03 10:51:59 AM  
You mean up there with all the radiation that's blocked by the magnetosphere and atmosphere down here?

The comic about sums it up.
 
2014-02-03 10:54:03 AM  

peterquince: I don't understand. What are the practical implications to this?


Anytime environmental change effects the life/health/ability to grow and divide of a cell it means it is altering the expression of various genes in the cell, triggering specific molecular pathways and so on. When we see different outcomes between cancer cells and non-cancer cells we can look and see how exactly they are responding differently, and try and figure out why. That tells us something about specific molecular pathways being activated/shut off in the cancerous versus non-cancerous cells. Now it may very well be that those are already pathways and genes we already know about, and already have lots of drugs that we use to target them in therapy. But it may also give us an indication about new possible targets that we can design or find drugs to specifically target.
 
2014-02-03 10:58:15 AM  

Jodeo: Approves.




/too obscure?


On Fark? No.

They should've sent a poet.
 
2014-02-03 11:00:44 AM  

entropic_existence: peterquince: I don't understand. What are the practical implications to this?

Anytime environmental change effects the life/health/ability to grow and divide of a cell it means it is altering the expression of various genes in the cell, triggering specific molecular pathways and so on. When we see different outcomes between cancer cells and non-cancer cells we can look and see how exactly they are responding differently, and try and figure out why. That tells us something about specific molecular pathways being activated/shut off in the cancerous versus non-cancerous cells. Now it may very well be that those are already pathways and genes we already know about, and already have lots of drugs that we use to target them in therapy. But it may also give us an indication about new possible targets that we can design or find drugs to specifically target.


So did this kind of start of as "hey I wonder what would happen if...."? Not shiatting on that, mind you. But I guess I always assumed that science was more.....quantum.....and "based on the last three experiments we did, we expect to see XYZ."
 
2014-02-03 11:03:10 AM  
www.themoviescene.co.uk
The ants are the cure.
 
2014-02-03 11:19:16 AM  
If you want to live forever, go to space...
 
2014-02-03 11:24:35 AM  

peterquince: entropic_existence: peterquince: I don't understand. What are the practical implications to this?

Anytime environmental change effects the life/health/ability to grow and divide of a cell it means it is altering the expression of various genes in the cell, triggering specific molecular pathways and so on. When we see different outcomes between cancer cells and non-cancer cells we can look and see how exactly they are responding differently, and try and figure out why. That tells us something about specific molecular pathways being activated/shut off in the cancerous versus non-cancerous cells. Now it may very well be that those are already pathways and genes we already know about, and already have lots of drugs that we use to target them in therapy. But it may also give us an indication about new possible targets that we can design or find drugs to specifically target.

So did this kind of start of as "hey I wonder what would happen if...."? Not shiatting on that, mind you. But I guess I always assumed that science was more.....quantum.....and "based on the last three experiments we did, we expect to see XYZ."


Oh hell no. A large portion of science, mind, IS like the later thing you described-but a lot is like the former, too. Graphene, for instance.

And then there's a surprising amount of discoveries that come about because someone *screwed up*, then realized they were seeing something interesting in their farkup and pursued it. (I'm actually in the process of doing one of those right now, and my advisor is actually rather pleased/excited. I finally feel like a REAL SCIENTIST).
 
2014-02-03 11:26:37 AM  

peterquince: So did this kind of start of as "hey I wonder what would happen if...."? Not shiatting on that, mind you. But I guess I always assumed that science was more.....quantum.....and "based on the last three experiments we did, we expect to see XYZ."


Also, sorry, that sounded snarkier than I intended it to be.

Basically: Some science is like what you described, some really is "Hey let's see what happens if we X!" For instance: A lot of high temp superconductor research is almost a guessing game (And by high temperature, I mean "Liquid Nitrogen", which IS high temperature for a superconductor.) . There is currently, if I remember correctly, no theory that explains/predicts high temperature ceramic superconductors.
 
2014-02-03 12:18:08 PM  

peterquince: So did this kind of start of as "hey I wonder what would happen if...."? Not shiatting on that, mind you. But I guess I always assumed that science was more.....quantum.....and "based on the last three experiments we did, we expect to see XYZ."


Sometimes you do experiments of the latter kind, more often you do exploratory work like the former. It's a mixed bag really. In this case it is really a mix of the two. There is a lot of background knowledge that goes into the "hmm... I wonder what happens then if we do this..." type experiments.
 
2014-02-03 12:50:46 PM  

Felgraf: (I'm actually in the process of doing one of those right now, and my advisor is actually rather pleased/excited. I finally feel like a REAL SCIENTIST).


Plus, you get to come to Fark and state, truthfully, that you need green lights for your research.
 
2014-02-03 01:19:55 PM  
Funny coincidence,

That's exactly the cancer I have, and going under the knife in a few weeks for.

*sigh* to think that going into outer space might fix this....
 
2014-02-03 01:25:50 PM  

imfallen_angel: Funny coincidence,

That's exactly the cancer I have, and going under the knife in a few weeks for.

*sigh* to think that going into outer space might fix this....


Good luck.
 
2014-02-03 02:33:13 PM  

Jodeo: Approves.

[i1.ytimg.com image 480x360]


/too obscure?


Nope, Contact was the first thing I thought of too. You just got to it first. *shakes tiny fist*
 
2014-02-03 06:09:51 PM  
I'm kind of sad QA isn't here to see this. It would have been glorious.
 
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