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(CBC)   Free range dementia patient hit by train   (cbc.ca) divider line 50
    More: Sad, dementia patients, Burlington Northern Santa Fe, railroad engineers, patient hit, trains, dementia  
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3270 clicks; posted to Main » on 03 Feb 2014 at 10:42 AM (22 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



50 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-02-03 09:40:37 AM
Ethically razed.
 
2014-02-03 10:43:38 AM
laughed at headline *facepalm*
 
2014-02-03 10:45:06 AM
I was expecting this to be about a homeless person.
 
2014-02-03 10:47:50 AM
People say you cant taste the difference between the caged dementia patients and the free range ones but I know I can.
 
2014-02-03 10:48:24 AM

orclover: People say you cant taste the difference between the caged dementia patients and the free range ones but I know I can.


Well at least now he's tenderized. Them's good eating.
 
2014-02-03 10:51:01 AM
Sad indeed, but sounds as if luckily not fatal. Dementia patients may need wear some sort of GPS device, but then would need monitored more closely. Mayhap not truly practical, calls for more staff, but necessary for their safety.
 
2014-02-03 10:58:20 AM
The CIA did it, at the orders of Patrick Stewart.
 
2014-02-03 11:01:45 AM

laulaja: Sad indeed, but sounds as if luckily not fatal. Dementia patients may need wear some sort of GPS device, but then would need monitored more closely. Mayhap not truly practical, calls for more staff, but necessary for their safety.


Luckily?

Inigomontoya.jpg
 
2014-02-03 11:01:52 AM
I was having dinner at a restaurant right where this happened (WAG - overlooking the scene) and was wondering what all the hubub was.  There were a ton of firetrucks and ambulances considering that it was one person.  I thought a bunch of teens had drunk themselves to death down at the beach.

/ east beach is where we all went to party when I was in high school.
// ... about 25 years ago
 
2014-02-03 11:04:29 AM

laulaja: Dementia patients may need wear some sort of GPS device, but then would need monitored more closely. Mayhap not truly practical, calls for more staff, but necessary for their safety.


My Mom suffered a subarachnoid (brain) aneurysm in 2003.  Lucky to survive.  After the eight-hour surgery, it's fair to say she was pretty loopy.  She could speak English, but she did a lot of things that didn't make sense in the weeks afterwards - board game sandwich in the microwave was one of the funnier ones.

The one thing she did know was that she hated the hospital and wanted to go home. We had to physically hold her back from the elevator a few times. One time, apparently, they didn't see her sneak on. Luckily, one of her nurses had just gotten off her shift and saw her walking around the parking lot "looking for her car" (which was obviously at home).

GPS tech hadn't gotten to where it is now at that point where there's something in every phone.  If there was, I would have definitely told them to put something on her.
 
2014-02-03 11:06:56 AM

orclover: People say you cant taste the difference between the caged dementia patients and the free range ones but I know I can.


especially if you slow cook or crock pot them. The caged ones really stink up the house, but the all natural, grass fed free range dementias don't have that strong odor...
just sayin
 
2014-02-03 11:09:26 AM
I have to admit that I laughed at the headline...
 
2014-02-03 11:15:03 AM
Pfighting Polish: board game sandwich in the microwave

My new cover band name.
 
2014-02-03 11:21:48 AM
FTA:   Police said the train engineer sounded the warning horn, but the man continued to walk toward the train.

Why didn't the engineer stop the train or just swerve to avoid the guy?
 
2014-02-03 11:25:29 AM

WhoIsNotInMyKitchen: I was having dinner at a restaurant right where this happened (WAG - overlooking the scene) and was wondering what all the hubub was.  There were a ton of firetrucks and ambulances considering that it was one person.  I thought a bunch of teens had drunk themselves to death down at the beach.

/ east beach is where we all went to party when I was in high school.
// ... about 25 years ago


encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com

And everyone went right back to eating.
 
2014-02-03 11:27:00 AM
Dear in the headlights?
 
2014-02-03 11:33:05 AM

laulaja: Sad indeed, but sounds as if luckily not fatal. Dementia patients may need wear some sort of GPS device, but then would need monitored more closely. Mayhap not truly practical, calls for more staff, but necessary for their safety.


They have stuff like that already. They are bracelets the dementia patients wear that are locked in place that keep doors from opening they aren't supposed to go through and if they make it through a door or sneak outside a siren goes off. It's actually pretty neat technology and standard in most good long term care homes but not much good for people that are being looked after at home.
 
2014-02-03 11:51:30 AM

Tr0mBoNe: Ethically razed.


You magnificent and evil bastard... lol
 
2014-02-03 11:55:52 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IJNR2EpS0jw

Reminds me of Dumb Ways to Die (an Android game about Train Safety)
 
2014-02-03 11:56:34 AM
Not a good time to be old and Canadian.
 
2014-02-03 11:57:51 AM
 
2014-02-03 12:00:11 PM
In his 70s, already has his brain rotting out of his head... seems like an awful lot of effort being put into trying to save a guy that if he was capable of the choice would probably want to be dead.
 
2014-02-03 12:00:34 PM
Some years ago I was the maintenance supt. at a local nursing home that had a steep hill behind it. Wireless fences (for dogs) were becoming quite popular and I did suggest to the management that we put something  like that at the building perimeter to keep the demented from wandering out and getting hurt. After the district manager finished laughing he told me that if I ever suggested something like that again I would be seeking employment elsewhere.

/Shock collars for the win. The infirm. The elderly.
//Doubleplus good headline subby! Would LOL again.
 
2014-02-03 12:01:10 PM
Just need to allow myself one more snicker at a headline and I'll get access to the Handbasket Club while I'm waiting to catch my train to hell.
 
2014-02-03 12:05:13 PM
If this guy doesn't have enough sense to avoid an oncoming train, how much of the original "person" is really left in there?  One has to wonder...
 
2014-02-03 12:08:46 PM
HOTY material right there going-to-hell-mitter
 
2014-02-03 12:11:18 PM

Smeggy Smurf: HOTY material right there going-to-hell-mitter


Well my wife and realized we had 4 left over seats on the charter bus to Hades we're reserving, so I thought why not snag in a few additional Farkers?
 
2014-02-03 12:11:58 PM

jshine: If this guy doesn't have enough sense to avoid an oncoming train, how much of the original "person" is really left in there?  One has to wonder...


Enough to try to put an end to the suffering.
 
2014-02-03 12:20:26 PM
Is free range supposedly a euphemism for non-hospitalized?
 
2014-02-03 12:21:22 PM
Seems like a thing with dementia patients.  Atlanta lost one this last week during the storm, and when located, he was in a train yard.  I think they ruled his death as due to exposure, rather than dementia.
 
2014-02-03 12:29:32 PM
I shouldn't have laughed, because I'll be there soon enough. But I did.
 
2014-02-03 12:29:49 PM

cherryl taggart: Seems like a thing with dementia patients.  Atlanta lost one this last week during the storm, and when located, he was in a train yard.  I think they ruled his death as due to exposure, rather than dementia.


Exposure to cold, or to a train?
 
2014-02-03 12:35:29 PM

walktoanarcade: laughed at headline *facepalm*


Yep, came here to give subby some Kudos for that one...
 
2014-02-03 12:39:59 PM

ChipNASA: Pfighting Polish: board game sandwich in the microwave

My new cover band name.


Uhu uh, too big to fit on a marquee love
 
2014-02-03 12:42:31 PM
"Too Big for the Marquee" is my new pop-soul band.
 
2014-02-03 12:50:10 PM

That Guy Jeff: In his 70s, already has his brain rotting out of his head... seems like an awful lot of effort being put into trying to save a guy that if he was capable of the choice would probably want to be dead.


I don't disagree, but the real hell of it is that by the time they're that far gone they can't give informed consent to anything, even euthanasia. If they CAN give informed consent then they aren't that far gone.

I used to be against euthanasia. Then my grandmother went through years of Alzheimers. Now, I just don't know... I'm not comfortable with it and there's a lot of hazy areas involved, but I just refuse to stand in judgment over those who take the option (if it were available) instead of that slow crawl of having your brain erased.

It's a hard thing.
 
2014-02-03 12:52:31 PM

akula: That Guy Jeff: In his 70s, already has his brain rotting out of his head... seems like an awful lot of effort being put into trying to save a guy that if he was capable of the choice would probably want to be dead.

I don't disagree, but the real hell of it is that by the time they're that far gone they can't give informed consent to anything, even euthanasia. If they CAN give informed consent then they aren't that far gone.

I used to be against euthanasia. Then my grandmother went through years of Alzheimers. Now, I just don't know... I'm not comfortable with it and there's a lot of hazy areas involved, but I just refuse to stand in judgment over those who take the option (if it were available) instead of that slow crawl of having your brain erased.

It's a hard thing.


Strap a bomb to her and have her go into a police station. Seems to work for the Afghani
 
2014-02-03 12:55:57 PM

laulaja: Sad indeed, but sounds as if luckily not fatal. Dementia patients may need wear some sort of GPS device, but then would need monitored more closely. Mayhap not truly practical, calls for more staff, but necessary for their safety.


I'm going to hazard a guess that this may not have been entirely accidental, if he didn't even react to a train horn, like most train-walking deaths. Of course, it's almost never stated outright.
 
2014-02-03 12:58:53 PM
No ticket.
 
2014-02-03 01:05:54 PM

akula: I used to be against euthanasia. Then my grandmother went through years of Alzheimers. Now, I just don't know... I'm not comfortable with it and there's a lot of hazy areas involved, but I just refuse to stand in judgment over those who take the option (if it were available) instead of that slow crawl of having your brain erased.


There's some in my family. I'd love to arrange in advance that if I get significant dementia, I die. Remember the real me not the shadow.

Some dementia patients still are able to remove a GPS bracelet or anklet. Explaining it will last 5 minutes before they forget and remove it. We have that problem.
 
2014-02-03 01:17:22 PM

AugieDoggyDaddy: FTA:   Police said the train engineer sounded the warning horn, but the man continued to walk toward the train.

Why didn't the engineer stop the train or just swerve to avoid the guy?


Cause he was too busy designing circuit boards.
 
2014-02-03 01:30:04 PM

Pfighting Polish: laulaja: Dementia patients may need wear some sort of GPS device, but then would need monitored more closely. Mayhap not truly practical, calls for more staff, but necessary for their safety.

My Mom suffered a subarachnoid (brain) aneurysm in 2003.  Lucky to survive.  After the eight-hour surgery, it's fair to say she was pretty loopy.  She could speak English, but she did a lot of things that didn't make sense in the weeks afterwards - board game sandwich in the microwave was one of the funnier ones.

The one thing she did know was that she hated the hospital and wanted to go home. We had to physically hold her back from the elevator a few times. One time, apparently, they didn't see her sneak on. Luckily, one of her nurses had just gotten off her shift and saw her walking around the parking lot "looking for her car" (which was obviously at home).

GPS tech hadn't gotten to where it is now at that point where there's something in every phone.  If there was, I would have definitely told them to put something on her.


The problem with GPS trackers for mentally impaired, especially dementia patients, is that they'll remove them.  Unless it's familiar, it'll just get taken off and left somewhere.  It has to be integrated into something they put on as part of their routine.
 
2014-02-03 01:41:04 PM
there is lojack for people.

lojack for people at risk
 
2014-02-03 01:43:35 PM

Ninja Otter: There's some in my family. I'd love to arrange in advance that if I get significant dementia, I die. Remember the real me not the shadow.


Yeah, it would need to be prearranged beforehand. I would probably myself set it up for something like advance directives. Even then it's hard to know when your loved one has passed the point at which there's really nothing left.

I will say, though, that it isn't hard at all to remember the real person and not the dementia riddled husk. Sure, my memories of my grandmother are colored by the last eight years of seeing her wither, but I still do remember the strong, proud, and capable woman she was. I hate hate HATE that Alzheimer's robbed her of ever knowing the woman I married, she'd have thought my wife was just the best person ever. Grandma was just too far gone when we met.

Fark Alzheimer's. Seriously, at least with other diseases you know who you are when you die.
 
2014-02-03 01:48:01 PM
DemTrak doesn't like tardiness.
 
2014-02-03 02:07:31 PM
the vain with no brain get hit mainly by the train.

/got nothin.
 
2014-02-03 03:12:37 PM

akula: That Guy Jeff: In his 70s, already has his brain rotting out of his head... seems like an awful lot of effort being put into trying to save a guy that if he was capable of the choice would probably want to be dead.

I don't disagree, but the real hell of it is that by the time they're that far gone they can't give informed consent to anything, even euthanasia. If they CAN give informed consent then they aren't that far gone.

I used to be against euthanasia. Then my grandmother went through years of Alzheimers. Now, I just don't know... I'm not comfortable with it and there's a lot of hazy areas involved, but I just refuse to stand in judgment over those who take the option (if it were available) instead of that slow crawl of having your brain erased.

It's a hard thing.


I really don't understand the opposition to euthanasia. We let our dogs die when they are in pain... but not people we supposedly care about? No one could possibly think it's better to watch your loved ones degrade and decay like that. And the whole "rights" aspect; who owns you, yourself or the government? What business does anyone have telling you what you can and can't do with your life? Wouldn't the single most fundamental human right be the right to decide to keep living or not? Even the religious aspect doesn't make sense; wouldn't you want your loved one to hang out with Jesus or Allah or whoever sooner? It's supposed to be a freakin' paradise waiting and someone wants to keep a whole bunch of tubes hooked up to their mortal shell essentially putting their soul in a hellish torture-dungeon for as long as possible before letting it finally escape to happy times? Isn't that farking monstrous?

I think a few thousand years of the powerful promising awesome rewards they never actually have to deliver (paradise after death) combined with not wanting your labor force to diminish themselves to get those rewards (or just because their lives are crap) has created this collateral damage of preventing the elderly from having the same dignity we extend to dogs. If it's not an absolute sin for peeps to kill themselves then the young working people might think "hey, working this mud farm dawn to dusk for my Lord is a drag, I'm going to opt out." and you can't be losing labor. So the elderly and dying get the sh*t end of the deal just to keep the labor numbers up. It's sick, and I really can't see how ANYONE could maintain an anti-euthanasia view if they just thought about it.
 
2014-02-03 05:13:55 PM
That train driver is a real bastage.  He saw the guy and didn't even try to turn the train
 
2014-02-03 08:01:05 PM
Spent some time last year with a very dear friend, who is much younger than I, but is suffering from a degenerate brain disease (her doctors have never used the term 'Altzheimers').
When we first saw her, she seemed OK, but after a few weeks, it was clear that what defined her just wasn't there.
Walking onto the train tracks isn't such a bad way to go, although it isn't fair on the Engineer.
 
2014-02-04 07:30:28 AM

That Guy Jeff: It's sick, and I really can't see how ANYONE could maintain an anti-euthanasia view if they just thought about it.


We are about religion here, when you actually think about it, it stops making sense. That is probably why we have so many À la carte Christians.
 
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