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(Google)   AT&T files patent to control access to internet and to charge for different levels of access. And so it begins   (google.com) divider line 62
    More: Obvious, TCP/IP, delayed allocation, communications system, GPRS, HSDPA, RNC, plain  
•       •       •

11542 clicks; posted to Main » on 02 Feb 2014 at 6:43 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

2014-02-02 03:08:24 PM  
10 votes:
img.photobucket.com
2014-02-02 07:42:05 PM  
7 votes:
I laugh so hard at people who think everything is about to move to the cloud. Internet access in most of the country sucks. Just because the Bay Area has good service doesn't mean everyone else does.
2014-02-02 03:32:57 PM  
7 votes:

cman: DanZero: [img.photobucket.com image 666x485]

Will never happen.

The Internet is not going to devolve into BBS-like systems.

Its against its culture. The Internet is decentralized. Anyone who tries to subvert this will lose all their customers. They do push hard but they would never push that hard.


unless all the providers colude to maximize profits and stick it to the consumers .like they do with cable. it will probably happen.
2014-02-02 06:47:53 PM  
6 votes:

cman: Its against its culture. The Internet is decentralized. Anyone who tries to subvert this will lose all their customers. They do push hard but they would never push that hard.


Yeah, if my internet provider pushes too hard, I'll just go to another one which doesn't exist.

My grievance will be filed in the same dumpster that my concerns on power rate increases go into.
2014-02-02 07:00:52 PM  
5 votes:
I swear to god they already are doing this and have been violating "Net Neutrality" in my area for at least two years.  I can sit around gaming, commenting on fark, facebooking, and doing research all day, and my DSL is running correctly.  Mind you this is DSL on AT&T in the middle of podunk Arkansas, where my only other internet options are:  56k dial up (yeah really) or highly unreliable satellite service that goes out every time it gets cloudy outside. Anyway, the second I start streaming, be it YouTube, Netflix, or Amazon Prime, and suddenly, my DSL is a shaky, slow POS.  It will literally slow down to the point that Netflix thinks it has dropped the server altogether.  So, I call and talk to "customer service" and get some moron in India that does not even know where podunk, Arkansas IS and he tries to make like this is a hardware problem on my end...until I tell him it happens on my PC, on my PS 3, on my Wii, and on my Tivo with equal reliability.  At which point, my phone call is conveniently "dropped" because, duh, Indian dude needs that job at the call center!
2014-02-02 10:45:04 PM  
4 votes:
The phenomenon of "bandwidth abuse" results directly from vaguely describing parameters of a use contract, and intentionally falsely stating that a class of service is "unlimited", then accusing high-bandwidth users of "abuse". Stop lying about the parameters of your service, and the "abuse" bullshiat goes away. But that isn't what you are up to, is it?
2014-02-02 09:18:01 PM  
4 votes:

Enemabag Jones: cman
DanZero: [img.photobucket.com image 666x485]
Will never happen.
The Internet is not going to devolve into BBS-like systems.
Its against its culture. The Internet is decentralized. Anyone who tries to subvert this will lose all their customers. They do push hard but they would never push that hard.

The next logical step would be consumers going secure VPN sites to encrypt. Then either service level (speed or measured data) would be adjusted according the plan, or providers would have to restrict vpn usage.


Of course VPN usage would be restricted.  You'd have to subscribe to the "business" service to use VPN.  Home users don't need that feature.  Duh.
pla
2014-02-02 07:21:41 PM  
4 votes:
cman : Anyone who tries to subvert this will lose all their customers.

To whom, exactly?

Most Americans have zero, one, or two realistic choices for internet access (I'll exclude bad jokes like HughesNet and going back to dialup). Personally, I have exactly one choice for "broadband", and by that word I mean only one tiny notch above satellite internet.

If my ISP decided to ban the entire world of Google (search, GMail, YouTube, etc), I couldn't do a damned thing about it except smile and apply the complimentary lube.
2014-02-02 07:07:01 PM  
4 votes:

cman: There are too many companies in competition who have no problem investing in building their own computer networks.


When's the last time someone ran a new wire to your house? On the backend this is easy to route around (and big exchanges aren't interested in such a thing in the first place), but over the last mile there is no competition, and no other choice if you're unhappy with your provider.
2014-02-02 09:58:07 PM  
3 votes:

DubtodaIll: Why does greed go so unchecked in this country?


Because it was touted as a nostrum for an ailing economy in 1980 after a lot of meetings between a lot of greedy old men who decided they needed better PR.  It has been sold as a bolt hole, not a failing and as an admirable trait and not a despicable sin in a nation that runs on money and little else.


Because it moves money upchain,  and that's been the only interest of those with enough money to influence the movement of money for a long time.  A handful or billionaires became Skynet style self aware and noticed the 50 mile wide ass print they had on the economy at large, and so they formed a club.


Because somebody told us it was good, and that it was a virtue because it made wealthy people wealthier and gave us somebody to rot for while we sat in front of the 27" Sony watching reruns over a plate of mac and cheese.  Because we're gullible chicken sh*ts.  Because behind every billion dollars is a thug with a badge and we better not start any trouble.


Because the people who are served by picking our pockets clean and emptying the national safe into the trunk of the getaway car have very large ad budgets that let them say greed is normal.
2014-02-02 09:36:36 PM  
3 votes:

Enemabag Jones: AloysiusSnuffleupagus
Of course VPN usage would be restricted. You'd have to subscribe to the "business" service to use VPN. Home users don't need that feature. Duh.

It would be really interesting to see residential accounts access to secure vpn restricted. Because that would be a new layer of fun for people trying to vpn into work accounts from home.


You act like you are utterly unaware that there is a fairly solid history of these kinds of things.  You can't run a webserver from your house, you used to be able to.  You can't run a mail server, you used to be able to.  You can't run an FTP server... etc etc etc.  Slow boil.

VPN restrictions already exist on some carriers.  I had to call the tech line and get a exception registered for my mom's house on her DSL to be able to VPN to her office (INTEL for crying out loud).

I've personally had various services either cancel my service, or threaten to over the years over a number of issues.  From running a private FTP to having bit torrent to having (actual quote) "a lot of encrypted traffic".  (comcast actually canceled me for that)  And again a year later for "exceeding your bandwidth limits" on my unlimited access plan.  Apparently if you transfer 200gigs a month, they get pissy.  To be fair, I saw that one coming.
2014-02-02 09:25:00 PM  
3 votes:

Cork on Fork: Seriously, you are living large with two options. I live in NYC and Time Warner is the only choice.


==============

And most of the city will never see FIOS.  Verizon has already stated that wiring up older apartment buildings is not worth it to them.
2014-02-02 08:23:32 PM  
3 votes:

cman: Kahabut: cman: DanZero: [img.photobucket.com image 666x485]

Will never happen.

The Internet is not going to devolve into BBS-like systems.

Its against its culture. The Internet is decentralized. Anyone who tries to subvert this will lose all their customers. They do push hard but they would never push that hard.

It's pretty funny to hear this.  If you knew anything about the actual construction of the internet, you'd know that we already pretty much missed that bus.  The internet was BUILT with those concepts, but it hasn't been operated that way in a very long time.

As a for instance, try and run a server on your home internet connection and see how that goes for you.

ISPs have never allowed one to run some sort of web browser on their network.


They did before the ISPs decided to start charging more for node level access to the internet.  Don't worry, this all happened before you were born.
2014-02-02 07:47:15 PM  
3 votes:

Teresaol31: I swear to god they already are doing this and have been violating "Net Neutrality" in my area for at least two years.  I can sit around gaming, commenting on fark, facebooking, and doing research all day, and my DSL is running correctly.  Mind you this is DSL on AT&T in the middle of podunk Arkansas, where my only other internet options are:  56k dial up (yeah really) or highly unreliable satellite service that goes out every time it gets cloudy outside. Anyway, the second I start streaming, be it YouTube, Netflix, or Amazon Prime, and suddenly, my DSL is a shaky, slow POS.  It will literally slow down to the point that Netflix thinks it has dropped the server altogether.  So, I call and talk to "customer service" and get some moron in India that does not even know where podunk, Arkansas IS and he tries to make like this is a hardware problem on my end...until I tell him it happens on my PC, on my PS 3, on my Wii, and on my Tivo with equal reliability.  At which point, my phone call is conveniently "dropped" because, duh, Indian dude needs that job at the call center!


There was talk of some ISPs forging Reset (RST) packets to streams they didn't approve of.

If you were into that sort of thing, you could install Wireshark, a packet sniffer program, to catch that sort of thing.  Often you can set your firewall to drop all inbound RST packets.   Its probably not something a novice wants to deal with.

To shield your whole house you'd need a router with a real rule based firewall, like an access point reflashed with something like DD-WRT
2014-02-02 07:18:28 PM  
3 votes:
Seriously, you are living large with two options. I live in NYC and Time Warner is the only choice.
2014-02-02 07:13:28 PM  
3 votes:

cman: There are too many companies in competition who have no problem investing in building their own computer networks. Any collusion to do something like that wont hold up under economic pressure


If I want internet speed faster than DSL, I have exactly two choices: Cablevision or Verizon.

I consider myself lucky for actually having a choice, as some places in the US don't.
=Smidge=
/I do love my FiOS.
2014-02-02 11:38:47 PM  
2 votes:

cman: DanZero: [img.photobucket.com image 666x485]

Will never happen.

The Internet is not going to devolve into BBS-like systems.

Its against its culture. The Internet is decentralized. Anyone who tries to subvert this will lose all their customers. They do push hard but they would never push that hard.


Most areas have only 2 options for high-speed internet access, some only have one. If both decide on restrictive pricing, then you're farked. I mean, I guess you could do dial-up.
2014-02-02 10:50:57 PM  
2 votes:
DubtodaIll: Why does greed go so unchecked in this country?

Because we do not burn these people at the stake, perhaps?
2014-02-02 10:16:47 PM  
2 votes:
The problem with a "global" economy and "diversified interests" is that it wipes it's ass with every law, every SEC rule, and every sense of loyalty to king and country by simply allowing the handful of people who own all this sh*t to make a few phone calls before lunch and set the course for trillions of dollars and business policies for *everything*, and when called on it, they just say "Hey, I don't work there, I'm not a broker, I'm simply an investor looking out for my interests.  I broke no laws".  And if you think everybody with a server rack and a backbone connection aren't all having breakfast in the same bed, you're not paying attention.  When you own the building, the individual tenant's businesses are just board tokens.
2014-02-02 09:55:36 PM  
2 votes:

Cpl.D: Fissile: Cork on Fork: Seriously, you are living large with two options. I live in NYC and Time Warner is the only choice.

==============

And most of the city will never see FIOS.  Verizon has already stated that wiring up older apartment buildings is not worth it to them.

You'll miss out on all that goodness of being on an oversold node on the network where they "traffic shape" all moderate to heavy users so it's not easily obvious to everyone else that they oversold the hell out of the service with the peak hour speed issues.




Even if FIOS isn't perfect, if it was an option at least I would have some sort of leverage against TWC. My service sucks and they keep raising prices because, well, F me, that's why. What else am I going to do?
2014-02-02 09:40:11 PM  
2 votes:

soundguy: Start home-based business

Sign up for business internet plan

Do anything you want - no port blocking, no DNS redirecting, no bandwidth limits, run servers 24/7

Write off cost of business internet as business expense

3) - profit

Point and laugh at the poors and the stupids


Get sued. Spend $15,000 to start defense...
2014-02-02 09:37:49 PM  
2 votes:
Why does greed go so unchecked in this country?
2014-02-02 09:31:00 PM  
2 votes:

Fissile: Cork on Fork: Seriously, you are living large with two options. I live in NYC and Time Warner is the only choice.

==============

And most of the city will never see FIOS.  Verizon has already stated that wiring up older apartment buildings is not worth it to them.


You'll miss out on all that goodness of being on an oversold node on the network where they "traffic shape" all moderate to heavy users so it's not easily obvious to everyone else that they oversold the hell out of the service with the peak hour speed issues.
2014-02-02 09:09:52 PM  
2 votes:
Soon as Google fiber gets here it's "screw you too" to cable, phone, satellite etc.
2014-02-02 07:08:59 PM  
2 votes:
I've been on AT&T as an ISP for the last half a year or so, and I can tell you it's been an absolute nightmare.  Their technology sucks, there are constant intermittent outages or random unexplained lag, and despite having called the technicians to come out and look at it at least 5 times, all they've ever done is replace the modem, as if it'll work this time even though it didn't work last time.

As soon as our commitment with AT&T is up we're getting the fark off AT&T.  Time Warner were assholes but at least their shiat worked.
2014-02-02 07:03:33 PM  
2 votes:
Start home-based business

Sign up for business internet plan

Do anything you want - no port blocking, no DNS redirecting, no bandwidth limits, run servers 24/7

Write off cost of business internet as business expense

3) - profit

Point and laugh at the poors and the stupids
2014-02-02 06:58:35 PM  
2 votes:
I have to give it to AT&T, they could create added value to American shareholders.

May I suggest that the water company also charge according to the purpose of the water used.
For instance, washing your car, that would be at the lowest tier.  Bathing, that would be set at higher tier.  Water used for cooking and and drinking, that would be set at the highest tier.

Why are water companies not taking advantage of tiered price options.  They could make so much more money for their shareholders.
2014-02-02 06:57:00 PM  
2 votes:
The phrase "I told you so" doesn't even begin to cover this madness.
2014-02-02 05:47:52 PM  
2 votes:

sithon: unless all the providers colude to maximize profits and stick it to the consumers .like they do with cable. it will probably happen.


Or it might be an opportunity for Google to take over the Internet.
2014-02-02 04:52:57 PM  
2 votes:

sithon: like they do with cable.


Then they can sit on their asses until whatever Netflix translation shows up and ruins them.


static2.wikia.nocookie.net

The internet...uh...finds a way.
2014-02-03 09:34:57 AM  
1 votes:

soundguy: There's always the option to simply move to someplace that doesn't suck balls. I run an online business, so internet access is a primary concern for me. When I bought my current house, I limited my search to only those suburban Seattle areas that were served by FIOS. With each succeeding generation, fast, reliable internet access becomes more and more of a requirement for a "normal" life. Eventually, areas with limited options for shiatty, overpriced service will suffer lower property values as "connected" people refuse to move there. That's going to hit taxing authorities right in the wallet and ultimately, we might see some intelligent last-mile regulation being put on the table.


=================

^ Typical "free-market", Ayn Rand derp-fest.  ^

Anyway you look at it, the net is a utility.  Utilities are natural monopolies.  Using the "free market" to pound a square peg utility into the round consumer bunger, will lead to predictably unpleasant results for the consumer.   Net neurtrality is going to put the hurt on poor and middle class people, while your "betters" won't notice any change at all.

As for your property value example, riddle me this, Rand Boob:   Why is that houses in New Jersey towns were property taxes can exceed $20K per year for single family detached homes have some of the hottest real estate markets while houses in towns with reasonable taxes go begging?    Hint: Net access is available in both places.
2014-02-03 06:13:51 AM  
1 votes:

Kahabut: soundguy: This is the THIRD incredibly clueless response to my original post. Is there ANYONE on Fark that has even the slightest clue about how running a business works?

Yes.  Several of us.

Funny story, you're entire cunning plan was without merit, since you can sign up for business class service without a business.

You are also suggesting that people commit tax fraud (which if you actually were a business person, you would probably know).

I'm curious though, how did you plan to register the business?  SP?  LLC?  INC?  Seriously, which of these options do you think lets you commit tax fraud?

If you actually ran a business on your business class connection, no matter the profit/loss for the business, you could do what you suggest.
However, you can't just create a DBA and register it, and then claim business write offs on your personal taxes.  You also can't create a false report of income or loss to file with the business taxes, so you can't write anything off in the way of business expense, because you didn't farking have a business.

Careful kiddo, some of us on fark actually DO this stuff for a living.  If you are doing half of what you have claimed in this thread, you are going to be in a world of trouble when the IRS catches up to you, and I assure you, they will.


---

See my response to the previous "expert". Like him, you apparently have reading comprehension problems. "start a BUSINESS" means exactly that. Nowhere did I say "PRETEND to start a fake business and then try to fark the IRS"

Yes, some of us DO actually do this stuff for a living, KIDDO. For the the last 39 years, to be exact. I currently operate 2 LLCs, an S-corp, and a couple of DBAs. I have a lawyer, an accounting firm, a registered agent, multiple commercial bank accounts, and servers in multiple countries. I administer everything from my home office, which I lease back to the corporation, all nice and legal. The IRS agrees.

Anyway, this discussion was about business internet service, which even at the lowest tier is going to be pushing $100 a month. If internet is extremely important to your life, you can just STFU and pay it, and you probably won't have to worry about crappy service or restrictions ever again. Alternately, if you put in even a tiny amount of effort, you can create a legitimate home-based business and if the business requires that internet connection*, then it's a business expense, just like everything else required to keep the business running. The IRS is pretty reasonable about legit business expenditures. Just don't claim anything you can't back up with receipts and documentation.

* if you do business communications over the net, it's justified. Drop a mail and/or web server in the closet that services your business domain and it's justified.
2014-02-03 01:53:53 AM  
1 votes:
filter
I see a lot pf people still don't get it.
Your neutral provider that you switch to won't help if your backbone carrier farks you over.


Explain more like we are kids. There are plenty of people, even those that work in IT that don't understand the specifics of the last mile, backbone, ect.
2014-02-03 12:50:30 AM  
1 votes:
I see a lot pf people still don't get it.


Your neutral provider that you switch to won't help if your backbone carrier farks you over.
2014-02-03 12:41:26 AM  
1 votes:
cman:
Will never happen.

The Internet is not going to devolve into BBS-like systems.

Its against its culture. The Internet is decentralized. Anyone who tries to subvert this will lose all their customers. They do push hard but they would never push that hard.


upload.wikimedia.org

You were saying?
2014-02-03 12:00:42 AM  
1 votes:

fusillade762: Bandwidth Abuse

Is that what they're calling it these days?


I got a kick out of that too. "Abuse?" Really? F*ck you, AT&T. God forbid I use something I'm paying you for.

/Disclaimer: I do not pay AT&T for my Internet access.
hej
2014-02-02 11:52:10 PM  
1 votes:

cman: DanZero: [img.photobucket.com image 666x485]

Will never happen.

The Internet is not going to devolve into BBS-like systems.

Its against its culture. The Internet is decentralized. Anyone who tries to subvert this will lose all their customers. They do push hard but they would never push that hard.


Next you'll tell me there's no way cell carriers would start capping the data plans, for the same reason.
2014-02-02 10:53:25 PM  
1 votes:

cman: cman: Kahabut: cman: DanZero: [img.photobucket.com image 666x485]

Will never happen.

The Internet is not going to devolve into BBS-like systems.

Its against its culture. The Internet is decentralized. Anyone who tries to subvert this will lose all their customers. They do push hard but they would never push that hard.

It's pretty funny to hear this.  If you knew anything about the actual construction of the internet, you'd know that we already pretty much missed that bus.  The internet was BUILT with those concepts, but it hasn't been operated that way in a very long time.

As a for instance, try and run a server on your home internet connection and see how that goes for you.

ISPs have never allowed one to run some sort of web server on their network.

lol, wow. Let me try that again. Fixt


Fine. So far. For years I've run servers on every internet connection that I've had; cable, DSL, even 3g. FTP, SSH, WWW, email. Never any problems. They are all low traffic, and just for testing purposes, and remote backup for when I'm traveling. I've never had any kind of commercial account.

/also always known my days are numbered
2014-02-02 10:07:45 PM  
1 votes:

profplump: cman: There are too many companies in competition who have no problem investing in building their own computer networks.

When's the last time someone ran a new wire to your house? On the backend this is easy to route around (and big exchanges aren't interested in such a thing in the first place), but over the last mile there is no competition, and no other choice if you're unhappy with your provider.


When you can't go over them, under them or around them.

www.privateinternetaccess.com

Go straight through them.

/they can't block what they can't see
2014-02-02 10:06:44 PM  
1 votes:

Flint Ironstag: T-Servo: profplump: cman: There are too many companies in competition who have no problem investing in building their own computer networks.

When's the last time someone ran a new wire to your house? On the backend this is easy to route around (and big exchanges aren't interested in such a thing in the first place), but over the last mile there is no competition, and no other choice if you're unhappy with your provider.

Yeah, look at Canada as an example. We went with a smaller company that didn't have data caps (all the majors do), but had to pay royalties for using Bell Canada's wires. It was all damned expensive.

When the UK opened up the market for phone service, before the internet took off, it made it law that the phone company that owned the network must allow any company access to the network on equal terms, and that carried over to the internet. I could start an ISP tomorrow from my bedroom and serve the entire country and be competitive on price. Result is I have literally two hundred ISP to choose from, all offering different deals, prices, speeds etc. The network has been upgraded to FTTC and FTTP is on the way.


Yes, and mobile service in the UK costs a pittance compared to Canada. Bell Canada's level of evil makes AT&T look amateurish in comparison.

/hate Rogers, too
2014-02-02 10:06:06 PM  
1 votes:

Guntram Shatterhand: Nothing blows the 'corporations do things better than the government' than Internet Access.  All this talk of a 'bandwidth shortage' shows corporations simply cannot handle infrastructure to save their lives.


crabbygolightly.com
                            "Depends on how you mean "handle"
2014-02-02 10:03:29 PM  
1 votes:
Nothing blows the 'corporations do things better than the government' than Internet Access.  All this talk of a 'bandwidth shortage' shows corporations simply cannot handle infrastructure to save their lives.
2014-02-02 09:46:48 PM  
1 votes:

DubtodaIll: Why does greed go so unchecked in this country?


Freedom.
2014-02-02 09:42:40 PM  
1 votes:

Cpl.D: Fissile: Cork on Fork: Seriously, you are living large with two options. I live in NYC and Time Warner is the only choice.

==============

And most of the city will never see FIOS.  Verizon has already stated that wiring up older apartment buildings is not worth it to them.

You'll miss out on all that goodness of being on an oversold node on the network where they "traffic shape" all moderate to heavy users so it's not easily obvious to everyone else that they oversold the hell out of the service with the peak hour speed issues.


===========

I've got a Verizon POTS line with DSL, I think I've got the last such set up in this hood....everyone else having gone FIOS or cable.   Verizon had been on my ass for over a year, trying everything to get me to switch to FIOS, including lies and threats.  I called the state board of public utilities and filed a complaint.  They've left me alone since, but I know my time is numbered.  Fact is the POTS lines will stay active only as long as they don't need any repair.  Once it dies, they will refuse to repair the line and that's It.
2014-02-02 09:34:46 PM  
1 votes:

Teresaol31: I swear to god they already are doing this and have been violating "Net Neutrality" in my area for at least two years.  I can sit around gaming, commenting on fark, facebooking, and doing research all day, and my DSL is running correctly.  Mind you this is DSL on AT&T in the middle of podunk Arkansas, where my only other internet options are:  56k dial up (yeah really) or highly unreliable satellite service that goes out every time it gets cloudy outside. Anyway, the second I start streaming, be it YouTube, Netflix, or Amazon Prime, and suddenly, my DSL is a shaky, slow POS.  It will literally slow down to the point that Netflix thinks it has dropped the server altogether.  So, I call and talk to "customer service" and get some moron in India that does not even know where podunk, Arkansas IS and he tries to make like this is a hardware problem on my end...until I tell him it happens on my PC, on my PS 3, on my Wii, and on my Tivo with equal reliability.  At which point, my phone call is conveniently "dropped" because, duh, Indian dude needs that job at the call center!


I feel for ya, sis. Partially solved my problem by using my smartphone as a modem. If you have a solid phone signal you oughta be able to purchase PDAnet and use that phone signal as your internet connection. It is invisible to your phone service, you won't have to pay the $ per month Big Red wants to charge for THEIR plan.
Speeds are good- I can watch a movie with few if any hiccups.

/podunk Florida
//used to live in podunk Arkansas
2014-02-02 09:26:51 PM  
1 votes:
AloysiusSnuffleupagus
Of course VPN usage would be restricted. You'd have to subscribe to the "business" service to use VPN. Home users don't need that feature. Duh.

It would be really interesting to see residential accounts access to secure vpn restricted. Because that would be a new layer of fun for people trying to vpn into work accounts from home.
2014-02-02 08:42:44 PM  
1 votes:

cman: Kahabut: cman: Kahabut: cman: DanZero: [img.photobucket.com image 666x485]

Will never happen.

The Internet is not going to devolve into BBS-like systems.

Its against its culture. The Internet is decentralized. Anyone who tries to subvert this will lose all their customers. They do push hard but they would never push that hard.

It's pretty funny to hear this.  If you knew anything about the actual construction of the internet, you'd know that we already pretty much missed that bus.  The internet was BUILT with those concepts, but it hasn't been operated that way in a very long time.

As a for instance, try and run a server on your home internet connection and see how that goes for you.

ISPs have never allowed one to run some sort of web browser on their network.

They did before the ISPs decided to start charging more for node level access to the internet.  Don't worry, this all happened before you were born.

I was born in 1983.

ISPs in the sense that we know them didn't exist.


Which is because the sense we know them now, is a service provider with limited access, and restricted functions.

The internet was built on the concept that each node (computer) would have equal access and could both serve and receive the same as any other node.  However, ISPs decided that they could make a lot more money by metering access and restricting what kind of access you got for your money.

Like I said, most of this happened before you were born.  Just because you aren't aware of just how far the ideal has fallen, doesn't make it not true.
2014-02-02 08:12:55 PM  
1 votes:

cman: DanZero: [img.photobucket.com image 666x485]

Will never happen.

The Internet is not going to devolve into BBS-like systems.

Its against its culture. The Internet is decentralized. Anyone who tries to subvert this will lose all their customers. They do push hard but they would never push that hard.


It's pretty funny to hear this.  If you knew anything about the actual construction of the internet, you'd know that we already pretty much missed that bus.  The internet was BUILT with those concepts, but it hasn't been operated that way in a very long time.

As a for instance, try and run a server on your home internet connection and see how that goes for you.
2014-02-02 08:10:58 PM  
1 votes:

pla: cman : Anyone who tries to subvert this will lose all their customers.

To whom, exactly?

Most Americans have zero, one, or two realistic choices for internet access (I'll exclude bad jokes like HughesNet and going back to dialup). Personally, I have exactly one choice for "broadband", and by that word I mean only one tiny notch above satellite internet.

If my ISP decided to ban the entire world of Google (search, GMail, YouTube, etc), I couldn't do a damned thing about it except smile and apply the complimentary lube.


Hey, at least you got it complementary. I have to pay a fee. :(
2014-02-02 08:04:01 PM  
1 votes:

fusillade762: pla: cman : Anyone who tries to subvert this will lose all their customers.

To whom, exactly?

Most Americans have zero, one, or two realistic choices for internet access (I'll exclude bad jokes like HughesNet and going back to dialup). Personally, I have exactly one choice for "broadband", and by that word I mean only one tiny notch above satellite internet.

If my ISP decided to ban the entire world of Google (search, GMail, YouTube, etc), I couldn't do a damned thing about it except smile and apply the complimentary lube.

Same here. Where I live it's Comcast or nothing.


Here it's Charter or AT&T. There's a satellite company too, but it's useless for gaming or streaming.

Both AT&T and Charter have already been doing some of this, especially with filesharing programs. On Charter, I can stream multiple sources at once, but as soon as I activate any torrent-based filesharing program, my internet stops working and I have to reboot the modem. I can fix it with a proxy or VPN, but even then the connection is slowed by more than it should be.
2014-02-02 08:01:55 PM  
1 votes:

LesserEvil: Maybe AT&T's patent on squashing Net Neutrality is a good thing, for everybody else.... Other ISPs will have to maintain neutrality or pay AT&T royalties.


That's kinda what I'm optimistically thinking.
2014-02-02 07:51:09 PM  
1 votes:

sithon: cman: DanZero: [img.photobucket.com image 666x485]

Will never happen.

The Internet is not going to devolve into BBS-like systems.

Its against its culture. The Internet is decentralized. Anyone who tries to subvert this will lose all their customers. They do push hard but they would never push that hard.

unless all the providers colude to maximize profits and stick it to the consumers .like they do with cable. it will probably happen.


 This is why I can't help but wonder if one of the companies is trying to patent it, wouldn't that prevent the other companies from following suit?  Meaning if AT&T were to actually utilize their patent, and threaten to sue anyone who infringed upon it, they'd lose their clients to their competitors?
2014-02-02 07:39:45 PM  
1 votes:

pla: cman : Anyone who tries to subvert this will lose all their customers.

To whom, exactly?

Most Americans have zero, one, or two realistic choices for internet access (I'll exclude bad jokes like HughesNet and going back to dialup). Personally, I have exactly one choice for "broadband", and by that word I mean only one tiny notch above satellite internet.

If my ISP decided to ban the entire world of Google (search, GMail, YouTube, etc), I couldn't do a damned thing about it except smile and apply the complimentary lube.


Same here. Where I live it's Comcast or nothing.
2014-02-02 07:26:18 PM  
1 votes:

pla: cman : Anyone who tries to subvert this will lose all their customers.

To whom, exactly?

Most Americans have zero, one, or two realistic choices for internet access (I'll exclude bad jokes like HughesNet and going back to dialup). Personally, I have exactly one choice for "broadband", and by that word I mean only one tiny notch above satellite internet.

If my ISP decided to ban the entire world of Google (search, GMail, YouTube, etc), I couldn't do a damned thing about it except smile and apply the complimentary lube.


Wait a second, you get lube?!
2014-02-02 07:22:32 PM  
1 votes:

Smidge204: cman: There are too many companies in competition who have no problem investing in building their own computer networks. Any collusion to do something like that wont hold up under economic pressure

If I want internet speed faster than DSL, I have exactly two choices: Cablevision or Verizon.

I consider myself lucky for actually having a choice, as some places in the US don't.
=Smidge=
/I do love my FiOS.


Two choices aside from DSL is good. Most places have one choice, unless they spend a lot more and go with SkyWeb (satellite).
2014-02-02 07:20:00 PM  
1 votes:
Boycott AT&T and Verizon.

It's easy if you try.  They're begging you to do it.  Their other subscribers are begging you to do it.
2014-02-02 07:18:56 PM  
1 votes:
AT&T sucks. I'm quitting them tomorrow after a really lousy 3/4 of a month with frequent drop-outs, slow-downs, and snotty reps on the phone.

Back to the cable company, for me.
2014-02-02 06:54:01 PM  
1 votes:
cman
DanZero: [img.photobucket.com image 666x485]
Will never happen.
The Internet is not going to devolve into BBS-like systems.
Its against its culture. The Internet is decentralized. Anyone who tries to subvert this will lose all their customers. They do push hard but they would never push that hard.

The next logical step would be consumers going secure VPN sites to encrypt. Then either service level (speed or measured data) would be adjusted according the plan, or providers would have to restrict vpn usage.
2014-02-02 06:49:44 PM  
1 votes:
Maybe AT&T's patent on squashing Net Neutrality is a good thing, for everybody else.... Other ISPs will have to maintain neutrality or pay AT&T royalties.
2014-02-02 06:48:46 PM  
1 votes:
This is actually a...big deal.. and I say that with great reservation.  Hopefully the entire supreme court are not puppets... o gawd honey where is my passport?
2014-02-02 05:45:07 PM  
1 votes:
Bandwidth Abuse

Is that what they're calling it these days?
2014-02-02 03:22:16 PM  
1 votes:

DanZero: [img.photobucket.com image 666x485]


Will never happen.

The Internet is not going to devolve into BBS-like systems.

Its against its culture. The Internet is decentralized. Anyone who tries to subvert this will lose all their customers. They do push hard but they would never push that hard.
 
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