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(Nashoba Publishing)   Massachusetts bans throwing away leftovers because don't you know there are starving children in Dorchester and will you PLEASE sit up straight and not roll your eyes while your governor is talking to you   (nashobapublishing.com) divider line 48
    More: PSA, Massachusetts, governors, waste types, energy economy, compressed natural gas, waste minimisation, technical assistance, diversion program  
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6112 clicks; posted to Main » on 01 Feb 2014 at 3:00 PM (37 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-02-01 01:39:21 PM  
Or, we could just have leftovers.
 
2014-02-01 02:37:00 PM  
Had friends who "rescued" food from dumpsters to alleviate waste.  Even fed it to their kids.  He works in IT and has the means to provide, but believed they were living more moral life by freeclaiming the food.
 
2014-02-01 02:58:09 PM  
This isn't a new concept.  Some cities have been doing this for years.  IIRC they even had an episode on Dirty Jobs about this very thing, where restaurants have to set aside food waste in separate bins to be collected by local waste collectors who compost it and turn it into fertilizer.
 
2014-02-01 03:03:46 PM  
DON'T MAKE ME TURN THIS THREAD AROUND!
 
2014-02-01 03:06:21 PM  

AntiGravitas: Had friends who "rescued" food from dumpsters to alleviate waste.  Even fed it to their kids.  He works in IT and has the means to provide, but believed they were living more moral life by freeclaiming the food.


But hey, by the article this is another food-to-fuel scheme.  Once they get it up and running, if the price of energy goes higher than what they can get at the supermarket, not just corn producers but farms of all types, Tyson Chicken, etc, can just divert their trucks from the food retail packaging and processing direct to the profitable anaerobic digesters. A huge benefit for profit guarantees.
 
2014-02-01 03:08:09 PM  
I think it's a great idea.  Starving out the freepers is the only way to truly get rid of them.
 
2014-02-01 03:11:58 PM  

SwiftFox: AntiGravitas: Had friends who "rescued" food from dumpsters to alleviate waste.  Even fed it to their kids.  He works in IT and has the means to provide, but believed they were living more moral life by freeclaiming the food.

But hey, by the article this is another food-to-fuel scheme.  Once they get it up and running, if the price of energy goes higher than what they can get at the supermarket, not just corn producers but farms of all types, Tyson Chicken, etc, can just divert their trucks from the food retail packaging and processing direct to the profitable anaerobic digesters. A huge benefit for profit guarantees.


I hope you're trolling, but there's no way anybody's going to pay supermarket prices (2.99 lb for some chicken) for feedstock to make what amounts to natural gas (which is cheap and plentiful as it is in most places). Not when they can charge people that are mandated by law to have it hauled to their plant.
 
2014-02-01 03:15:51 PM  
People used to feed food waste to pigs. I don't know how much this was ever done on a larger than individual scale where pig ranchers had deals with several restaurants for what the dishwashers scraped off plates.

People are again proposing this though there is the problem of diseases and how you can protect large slop collection from contamination and poisons.

https://www.google.com/search?q=food+waste+pigs
 
2014-02-01 03:15:52 PM  
Aren't they called 'pig barrels'?
/dnrtfa
 
2014-02-01 03:16:29 PM  
I'd love to see some of the unspoiled food which must be disposed of to go to food banks and the like.  There's quite a bit of it that gets thrown out simply because a customer would rather buy a 'fresh baked' bread instead of a 'day old'.
 
2014-02-01 03:17:30 PM  

HairBolus: People used to feed food waste to pigs. I don't know how much this was ever done on a larger than individual scale where pig ranchers had deals with several restaurants for what the dishwashers scraped off plates.


Also shown on "Dirty Jobs".
 
2014-02-01 03:20:46 PM  
Or, they could just divert it to Wal*Marts.  It couldn't be much worse than the produce I've had to buy there lately.
 
2014-02-01 03:21:56 PM  

buzzcut73: SwiftFox: AntiGravitas: Had friends who "rescued" food from dumpsters to alleviate waste.  Even fed it to their kids.  He works in IT and has the means to provide, but believed they were living more moral life by freeclaiming the food.

But hey, by the article this is another food-to-fuel scheme.  Once they get it up and running, if the price of energy goes higher than what they can get at the supermarket, not just corn producers but farms of all types, Tyson Chicken, etc, can just divert their trucks from the food retail packaging and processing direct to the profitable anaerobic digesters. A huge benefit for profit guarantees.

I hope you're trolling, but there's no way anybody's going to pay supermarket prices (2.99 lb for some chicken) for feedstock to make what amounts to natural gas (which is cheap and plentiful as it is in most places). Not when they can charge people that are mandated by law to have it hauled to their plant.


m.quickmeme.com
 
2014-02-01 03:24:35 PM  
I'm okay with this.jpg
 
2014-02-01 03:27:17 PM  

buzzcut73: SwiftFox: AntiGravitas: Had friends who "rescued" food from dumpsters to alleviate waste.  Even fed it to their kids.  He works in IT and has the means to provide, but believed they were living more moral life by freeclaiming the food.

But hey, by the article this is another food-to-fuel scheme.  Once they get it up and running, if the price of energy goes higher than what they can get at the supermarket, not just corn producers but farms of all types, Tyson Chicken, etc, can just divert their trucks from the food retail packaging and processing direct to the profitable anaerobic digesters. A huge benefit for profit guarantees.

I hope you're trolling, but there's no way anybody's going to pay supermarket prices (2.99 lb for some chicken) for feedstock to make what amounts to natural gas (which is cheap and plentiful as it is in most places). Not when they can charge people that are mandated by law to have it hauled to their plant.


No one is talking about taking high value products off the market, they are talking about taking low value "waste streams" and converting them to energy.  For example, lets say you are a chicken farmer and I am a brewer.  When I make beer I have a shiat load of spent grains (crushed barley that I extracted the sugar from) to get rid of.  Since I have no use for the spent grains, I let you come over and pick them up for free (or maybe I charge you a nominal fee) as a high protein chicken feed.  I get free waste disposal, and you get free chicken food.  If an energy company comes along and offers to pay me for the spent grains so that they can turn it into electricity, I sell them the grains instead of you.  Your chicken margins are built on the assumption of cheap chicken food, so without my cheap grains you either have to raise prices or go out of business.  When you raise prices, the guy at the store now has to pay $3.49/lb for chicken.
 
2014-02-01 03:27:32 PM  

Infobahn: DON'T MAKE ME TURN THIS THREAD AROUND!


Mom!!!  Massachusetts is touching me with its anaerobic digestion biogas again!!!##!
 
2014-02-01 03:32:25 PM  
 
2014-02-01 03:33:03 PM  
What if I sit up straight, tilt my head down , eyes up, frowny-face, and flick these cherry tomatoes at him with my fork?
These things aren't even ripe and I don't like them on my salad at all.
 
2014-02-01 03:36:42 PM  

RogermcAllen: buzzcut73: SwiftFox: AntiGravitas: Had friends who "rescued" food from dumpsters to alleviate waste.  Even fed it to their kids.  He works in IT and has the means to provide, but believed they were living more moral life by freeclaiming the food.

But hey, by the article this is another food-to-fuel scheme.  Once they get it up and running, if the price of energy goes higher than what they can get at the supermarket, not just corn producers but farms of all types, Tyson Chicken, etc, can just divert their trucks from the food retail packaging and processing direct to the profitable anaerobic digesters. A huge benefit for profit guarantees.

I hope you're trolling, but there's no way anybody's going to pay supermarket prices (2.99 lb for some chicken) for feedstock to make what amounts to natural gas (which is cheap and plentiful as it is in most places). Not when they can charge people that are mandated by law to have it hauled to their plant.

No one is talking about taking high value products off the market, they are talking about taking low value "waste streams" and converting them to energy.  For example, lets say you are a chicken farmer and I am a brewer.  When I make beer I have a shiat load of spent grains (crushed barley that I extracted the sugar from) to get rid of.  Since I have no use for the spent grains, I let you come over and pick them up for free (or maybe I charge you a nominal fee) as a high protein chicken feed.  I get free waste disposal, and you get free chicken food.  If an energy company comes along and offers to pay me for the spent grains so that they can turn it into electricity, I sell them the grains instead of you.  Your chicken margins are built on the assumption of cheap chicken food, so without my cheap grains you either have to raise prices or go out of business.  When you raise prices, the guy at the store now has to pay $3.49/lb for chicken.


Ethanol plants are doing that to a degree right now-they bag up the spent grain and sell it to farmers as cattle feed.
Anyway, the post I was responding to specifically mentioned Tyson diverting truckloads of chicken from the processing plant to the digesters, and I was pointing out that was not going to happen.

This law allows for repurposing in the way you've mentioned--you can compost, use for animal feed, or send it to the biogas plant. What you cannot do is landfill, and that's a good thing in the long run. Honestly, I don't really see the people running the biogas plants out looking for stuff that would be good as animal feed anyway--they'll get plenty of half eaten meals from restaurants and schools to keep things up and running.
 
2014-02-01 03:37:24 PM  
Don't you mean Dawchestaw
 
2014-02-01 03:40:48 PM  

ArcadianRefugee: HairBolus: People used to feed food waste to pigs. I don't know how much this was ever done on a larger than individual scale where pig ranchers had deals with several restaurants for what the dishwashers scraped off plates.

Also shown on "Dirty Jobs".


Here is the link. At least they separate out most plastic and cook the slop from Las Vegas restaurants before feeding it to pigs. I wonder what the laws in various states are concerning commercial pig slop.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KRkCQH02AxE
img.youtube.com
Dirty Jobs : Pig Slop Processor by Discovery
 
2014-02-01 03:41:06 PM  
There are thirsty drunks in Ireland! Finish your beer!
 
2014-02-01 03:47:05 PM  

AntiGravitas: Had friends who "rescued" food from dumpsters to alleviate waste.  Even fed it to their kids.  He works in IT and has the means to provide, but believed they were living more moral life by freeclaiming the food.


Even when the food was expired, spoiled, contaminated, and/or moldy? That's why I throw out food.
 
2014-02-01 03:47:45 PM  
There was an episode of Dirty Jobs a few years back, where a guy collected buffet waste from casinos in Vegas, and fed it to his pigs, so no surprise.
 
2014-02-01 03:57:49 PM  

RogermcAllen: buzzcut73: SwiftFox: AntiGravitas: Had friends who "rescued" food from dumpsters to alleviate waste.  Even fed it to their kids.  He works in IT and has the means to provide, but believed they were living more moral life by freeclaiming the food.

But hey, by the article this is another food-to-fuel scheme.  Once they get it up and running, if the price of energy goes higher than what they can get at the supermarket, not just corn producers but farms of all types, Tyson Chicken, etc, can just divert their trucks from the food retail packaging and processing direct to the profitable anaerobic digesters. A huge benefit for profit guarantees.

I hope you're trolling, but there's no way anybody's going to pay supermarket prices (2.99 lb for some chicken) for feedstock to make what amounts to natural gas (which is cheap and plentiful as it is in most places). Not when they can charge people that are mandated by law to have it hauled to their plant.

No one is talking about taking high value products off the market, they are talking about taking low value "waste streams" and converting them to energy.  For example, lets say you are a chicken farmer and I am a brewer.  When I make beer I have a shiat load of spent grains (crushed barley that I extracted the sugar from) to get rid of.  Since I have no use for the spent grains, I let you come over and pick them up for free (or maybe I charge you a nominal fee) as a high protein chicken feed.  I get free waste disposal, and you get free chicken food.  If an energy company comes along and offers to pay me for the spent grains so that they can turn it into electricity, I sell them the grains instead of you.  Your chicken margins are built on the assumption of cheap chicken food, so without my cheap grains you either have to raise prices or go out of business.  When you raise prices, the guy at the store now has to pay $3.49/lb for chicken.



FTA:

"The ban, regulated by the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP), will require any entity that disposes of at least one ton of organic material per week to donate or re-purpose the useable food. Any remaining food waste will be shipped to an anaerobic digestion (AD) facility, where it will be converted to clean energy, or sent to composting and animal-feed operations."


Sounds good to me.  One more step to recycling everything.  In a few decades we'll look back at the idea of landfills and marvel at what a tremendous waste it was.
 
2014-02-01 04:01:48 PM  

TheDirtyNacho: RogermcAllen: buzzcut73: SwiftFox: AntiGravitas: Had friends who "rescued" food from dumpsters to alleviate waste.  Even fed it to their kids.  He works in IT and has the means to provide, but believed they were living more moral life by freeclaiming the food.

But hey, by the article this is another food-to-fuel scheme.  Once they get it up and running, if the price of energy goes higher than what they can get at the supermarket, not just corn producers but farms of all types, Tyson Chicken, etc, can just divert their trucks from the food retail packaging and processing direct to the profitable anaerobic digesters. A huge benefit for profit guarantees.

I hope you're trolling, but there's no way anybody's going to pay supermarket prices (2.99 lb for some chicken) for feedstock to make what amounts to natural gas (which is cheap and plentiful as it is in most places). Not when they can charge people that are mandated by law to have it hauled to their plant.

No one is talking about taking high value products off the market, they are talking about taking low value "waste streams" and converting them to energy.  For example, lets say you are a chicken farmer and I am a brewer.  When I make beer I have a shiat load of spent grains (crushed barley that I extracted the sugar from) to get rid of.  Since I have no use for the spent grains, I let you come over and pick them up for free (or maybe I charge you a nominal fee) as a high protein chicken feed.  I get free waste disposal, and you get free chicken food.  If an energy company comes along and offers to pay me for the spent grains so that they can turn it into electricity, I sell them the grains instead of you.  Your chicken margins are built on the assumption of cheap chicken food, so without my cheap grains you either have to raise prices or go out of business.  When you raise prices, the guy at the store now has to pay $3.49/lb for chicken.


FTA:

"The ban, regulated by the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP), will require any entity that disposes of at least one ton of organic material per week to donate or re-purpose the useable food. Any remaining food waste will be shipped to an anaerobic digestion (AD) facility, where it will be converted to clean energy, or sent to composting and animal-feed operations."


Sounds good to me.  One more step to recycling everything.  In a few decades we'll look back at the idea of landfills and marvel at what a tremendous waste it was.


Agree with the sentiment, but I can't help but think we'll be closer to full-on Idiocracy.
 
2014-02-01 04:11:48 PM  

OooShiny: Infobahn: DON'T MAKE ME TURN THIS THREAD AROUND!

Mom!!!  Massachusetts is touching me with its anaerobic digestion biogas again!!!##!


Something doesn't work in my brain and every time I read "biogas" it's always 'pronounced' weirdly, like it rhymes with "togas".
 
2014-02-01 04:14:05 PM  

Cyber_Junk: I'd love to see some of the unspoiled food which must be disposed of to go to food banks and the like.  There's quite a bit of it that gets thrown out simply because a customer would rather buy a 'fresh baked' bread instead of a 'day old'.


I'm sensing some judgement and blame towards the customers in your comment, but customers aren't entirely to blame.  It's human nature, people are going to spend their money to get what they perceive to be the 'best' food they can get for their money, and freshness is part of the equation.

The real crime is that so many businesses would rather throw out that day old bread or hold on to it without marking down the price sufficiently until it goes bad and MUST be thrown away.  If the options are to mark old bread down to a price where consumers will readily buy it or simply not sell it at all and go to waste, too many stores will choose to let it go to waste.  I see it all the time.  And to reiterate, if you mark down the day old bread by some minuscule amount and nobody's buying it, then you clearly haven't bothered to mark it down enough to make it worthwhile.
 
2014-02-01 04:18:03 PM  
Here in Philadelphia, restaurants must have a food grinder.  (just a big ass garbage disposal unit)

The solid food waste gets ground up and goes into the sewer system to be recycled.

/of course, you can always compost if you choose
 
2014-02-01 04:19:06 PM  
I just give my leftovers to my pet rats. Never have to buy them food and they eat better than some people.
 
2014-02-01 04:30:23 PM  

Cyber_Junk: I'd love to see some of the unspoiled food which must be disposed of to go to food banks and the like.  There's quite a bit of it that gets thrown out simply because a customer would rather buy a 'fresh baked' bread instead of a 'day old'.


There are some organizations doing that, e.g. Quest and Second Harvest.
 
2014-02-01 04:31:15 PM  

rebelyell2006: AntiGravitas: Had friends who "rescued" food from dumpsters to alleviate waste.  Even fed it to their kids.  He works in IT and has the means to provide, but believed they were living more moral life by freeclaiming the food.

Even when the food was expired, spoiled, contaminated, and/or moldy? That's why I throw out food.


No.  I believe they stuck to grocery store and restaurant dumpsters.
 
2014-02-01 04:52:37 PM  
Leftovers  -   Code for Restaurant Profit Margins.
 
2014-02-01 04:55:47 PM  

vd61: I just give my leftovers to my pet rats. Never have to buy them food and they eat better than some people.


You made me miss Felch. My g/f thought I was weird when I started making things like full PB&J and small meals when she stopped eating.
 
2014-02-01 04:56:49 PM  
FTA: Residential food materials and food waste from small businesses are not included in the ban.
 
2014-02-01 04:58:56 PM  

SwiftFox: But hey, by the article this is another food-to-fuel scheme.


In the sense that it's a plan that's been tried in nearing a hundred cities and proved cost effective in literally every case so far, yes.  A clever scheme to save money.
 
2014-02-01 05:03:26 PM  

thelordofcheese: vd61: I just give my leftovers to my pet rats. Never have to buy them food and they eat better than some people.

You made me miss Felch. My g/f thought I was weird when I started making things like full PB&J and small meals when she stopped eating.


Hi! Gordie here, on behalf of the rest of the western world I would like to pass the following non-threatening, non-judgmental message: owning a rat named "Felch" does seem a little weird.
 
2014-02-01 05:26:19 PM  
It is our patriotic duty to throw away four times as musc food as we eat

Because JERBS
 
2014-02-01 05:34:09 PM  

The Gordie Howe Hat Trick: thelordofcheese: vd61: I just give my leftovers to my pet rats. Never have to buy them food and they eat better than some people.

You made me miss Felch. My g/f thought I was weird when I started making things like full PB&J and small meals when she stopped eating.

Hi! Gordie here, on behalf of the rest of the western world I would like to pass the following non-threatening, non-judgmental message: owning a rat named "Felch" does seem a little weird.


Don't go on Urbandictionary and look up 'felch' or unless you already know what it means and that's why you're calling him a weirdo.  Then good day sir.
 
2014-02-01 05:35:23 PM  

LeroyBourne: The Gordie Howe Hat Trick: thelordofcheese: vd61: I just give my leftovers to my pet rats. Never have to buy them food and they eat better than some people.

You made me miss Felch. My g/f thought I was weird when I started making things like full PB&J and small meals when she stopped eating.

Hi! Gordie here, on behalf of the rest of the western world I would like to pass the following non-threatening, non-judgmental message: owning a rat named "Felch" does seem a little weird.

Don't go on Urbandictionary and look up 'felch' or unless you already know what it means and that's why you're calling him a weirdo.  Then good day sir.


She was an albino lab rat as well. I got her from one of the girls in ALLIES.
 
2014-02-01 06:48:45 PM  

MrHappyRotter: he real crime is that so many businesses would rather throw out that day old bread or hold on to it without marking down the price sufficiently until it goes bad and MUST be thrown away.  If the options are to mark old bread down to a price where consumers will readily buy it or simply not sell it at all and go to waste, too many stores will choose to let it go to waste.  I see it all the time.  And to reiterate, if you mark down the day old bread by some minuscule amount and nobody's buying it, then you clearly haven't bothered to mark it down enough to make it worthwhile.


As some one who bought a half-price sell-by-today loaf of whole wheat cranberry nut crusty loaf and a wheel of brie, I'm reading this thread with interest.

//tasty supper
 
2014-02-01 08:08:57 PM  

BunkyBrewman: Here in Philadelphia, restaurants must have a food grinder.  (just a big ass garbage disposal unit)

The solid food waste gets ground up and goes into the sewer system to be recycled.

/of course, you can always compost if you choose


Um... How do you "recycle" ground up food that has gone through the sewer system?
 
2014-02-01 08:34:16 PM  
Several charities besides soup kitchens have been using restaurant and cafeteria leftovers to supplement their food reserves (a men's shelter here in town is one of them).  Rock and Wrap it Up is sort of a national umbrella organization that my old college fraternity was involved in for a while.
 
2014-02-01 10:26:03 PM  
In basic training, entire pans of uneaten/untouched lasagne/desserts/whatever was in the pan would be discarded. I asked them on the times when I pulled KP if they donated that stuff or anything besides throwing it away, the response I got from the kitchen crew was that it did not, they had to throw it away because of the rules. So don't think this type of thing hasn't been happening years before this incident (my bct was in 2002) and is exclusive to schools. This happens elsewhere, and I'm sure in other places I don't know.
 
2014-02-02 01:05:15 AM  
According to Dirty Jobs, Nevada pigs get the finest in Las Vegas Buffet leftovers.
 
2014-02-02 01:51:21 AM  
Mail it to Ethernopia.

static3.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2014-02-02 05:35:05 AM  

Nick Nostril: TheDirtyNacho: RogermcAllen: buzzcut73: SwiftFox: AntiGravitas: Had friends who "rescued" food from dumpsters to alleviate waste.  Even fed it to their kids.  He works in IT and has the means to provide, but believed they were living more moral life by freeclaiming the food.

But hey, by the article this is another food-to-fuel scheme.  Once they get it up and running, if the price of energy goes higher than what they can get at the supermarket, not just corn producers but farms of all types, Tyson Chicken, etc, can just divert their trucks from the food retail packaging and processing direct to the profitable anaerobic digesters. A huge benefit for profit guarantees.

I hope you're trolling, but there's no way anybody's going to pay supermarket prices (2.99 lb for some chicken) for feedstock to make what amounts to natural gas (which is cheap and plentiful as it is in most places). Not when they can charge people that are mandated by law to have it hauled to their plant.

No one is talking about taking high value products off the market, they are talking about taking low value "waste streams" and converting them to energy.  For example, lets say you are a chicken farmer and I am a brewer.  When I make beer I have a shiat load of spent grains (crushed barley that I extracted the sugar from) to get rid of.  Since I have no use for the spent grains, I let you come over and pick them up for free (or maybe I charge you a nominal fee) as a high protein chicken feed.  I get free waste disposal, and you get free chicken food.  If an energy company comes along and offers to pay me for the spent grains so that they can turn it into electricity, I sell them the grains instead of you.  Your chicken margins are built on the assumption of cheap chicken food, so without my cheap grains you either have to raise prices or go out of business.  When you raise prices, the guy at the store now has to pay $3.49/lb for chicken.


FTA:

"The ban, regulated by the Massachusetts Department ...


Every time a concerned liberal says "Think of the children', we are a step closer to Idiocracy.
 
2014-02-02 06:56:48 AM  

o'really: BunkyBrewman: Here in Philadelphia, restaurants must have a food grinder.  (just a big ass garbage disposal unit)

The solid food waste gets ground up and goes into the sewer system to be recycled.

/of course, you can always compost if you choose

Um... How do you "recycle" ground up food that has gone through the sewer system?


Bacteria breaks it down during the composting process. Then it becomes nutrients for plants, small insects, worms, etc.

The problem with sewage is that people dump all kinds of harmful chemicals down the drain and you have to worry about those ending up in the compost.

It's OK for using with ornamental plants, but I'd worry about introducing it into areas where you grow edible plants.
 
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