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(Nature)   "Sex with Neanderthals had its ups and downs"   (nature.com ) divider line 37
    More: Obvious, Neanderthals, humans, human genome, X Chromosome, genomes, East Asians  
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4090 clicks; posted to Geek » on 01 Feb 2014 at 1:03 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



37 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

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2014-02-01 06:10:03 AM  
To be fair, it also had its share of ins and outs.
 
2014-02-01 07:52:12 AM  
So easy a caveman could do it.
 
jbc [TotalFark]
2014-02-01 11:48:31 AM  
FTFA:"Neanderthals aren't around, so you can't do a mating experiment," says Daven Presgraves, an evolutionary biologist at the University of Rochester in New York...

"but if they were, the ethics review panel would totally be cool with it."
 
2014-02-01 11:51:34 AM  

enry: So easy a caveman could do it her.


FTFY.
 
2014-02-01 01:07:31 PM  
i2.wp.com
 
2014-02-01 01:15:26 PM  

Baron Harkonnen: To be fair, it also had its share of ins and outs.


And its moans and groans?

/come to think of it, I'm not being particularly subtle
 
2014-02-01 01:35:44 PM  
"Akey's team found that one large chunk of modern-human genome that bears no Neanderthal contributions is the one that encompasses the gene FOXP2, which is involved in speech in humans."

Oook!


/Ugh!
 
2014-02-01 01:38:44 PM  
quest for procreation... or fire. Whatever floats your goat
i.imgur.com
 
2014-02-01 01:48:50 PM  
FTFA:
The teams looked for Neanderthal genes that were especially common in contemporary humans, a sign that the genes were useful to their new owners. Both groups identified a series of genes involved in the inner workings of cells called keratinocytes, which make up most of the outer layer of human skin and produce hair.
"It's tempting to speculate that Neanderthals were already adapted to colder environments in Eurasia" and that these genes helped modern humans to cope after they arrived from Africa,


I've never understood hariness. If it is an adaptation to cold then why are Southern Europeans more hairy than Northern Europeans? Maybe it has something to do with wearing cloths all the time (ancient Greeks were often depicted naked), and Vikings could put all their efforts into growing beards.

Are there legit studies on which Europeans are the most/least body-hairy and beard-hairy? If it turns out that say Bulgarians are the hariest do they also have the most other Neanderthal genes?
 
2014-02-01 01:58:52 PM  
Ahh, come on, you'd do her!
www.flixist.com
 
2014-02-01 02:03:35 PM  
[center]i.imgur.com[/center]
 
2014-02-01 02:20:20 PM  

HairBolus: I've never understood hariness. If it is an adaptation to cold then why are Southern Europeans more hairy than Northern Europeans? Maybe it has something to do with wearing cloths all the time (ancient Greeks were often depicted naked), and Vikings could put all their efforts into growing beards.


A professor of mine in college had a theory that human body hair wasn't used so much for keeping warm, but to detect bugs.  When a bug lands on you it's hard to feel it's legs on your skin, but if it bumps into a hair you can detect it more easily.
 
2014-02-01 02:37:38 PM  
All you have to do is walk down the street to see that Neanderthals are still among us.
 
2014-02-01 02:45:38 PM  

Xythero: HairBolus: I've never understood hariness. If it is an adaptation to cold then why are Southern Europeans more hairy than Northern Europeans? Maybe it has something to do with wearing cloths all the time (ancient Greeks were often depicted naked), and Vikings could put all their efforts into growing beards.

A professor of mine in college had a theory that human body hair wasn't used so much for keeping warm, but to detect bugs.  When a bug lands on you it's hard to feel it's legs on your skin, but if it bumps into a hair you can detect it more easily.


If that's the case you would expect regional hariness to be correlated with insect born disease problems, but that doesn't seem to be the case for malaria:

upload.wikimedia.org
vs this hairiness map:
upload.wikimedia.org

The map is not sourced and may in part represent original native populations.

Also the "bug detector" hypothesis may have no bearing on hariness because a light down might be as good or better than a thick carpet and provide no home for lice.

That whole Wikipedia article on body hair may show how little is known - many of the references seem be quite old and coming from racial theories.
 
2014-02-01 02:50:15 PM  
HairBolus

I've never understood hariness. If it is an adaptation to cold then why are Southern Europeans more hairy than Northern Europeans? Maybe it has something to do with wearing cloths all the time (ancient Greeks were often depicted naked), and Vikings could put all their efforts into growing beards.
Xythero
A professor of mine in college had a theory that human body hair wasn't used so much for keeping warm, but to detect bugs.  When a bug lands on you it's hard to feel it's legs on your skin, but if it bumps into a hair you can detect it more easily.

Xythero wins the prize.  My information says that body hair helps us feel and then swat mosquitoes found most often in warmer climates.  However, I've nearly been eaten alive by mosquitoes several times while camped on shores of Canadian lakes.  All you body-shaved pretty boys had best start eating your quinine pills or you will catch the malaria.
 
2014-02-01 02:54:44 PM  
Why do I feel like this, "sex with Neanderthals," is just a polite way of saying, "a decent amount of inter-species rape occurred"?
 
2014-02-01 03:25:36 PM  
Sometime the ups out numbered the downs but not in......
 
2014-02-01 04:11:30 PM  

Virtuoso80: Why do I feel like this, "sex with Neanderthals," is just a polite way of saying, "a decent amount of inter-species rape occurred"?


I assume you think that Neanderthals were doing the raping, but you'd be wrong.
 
2014-02-01 04:30:07 PM  

lewismarktwo: Virtuoso80: Why do I feel like this, "sex with Neanderthals," is just a polite way of saying, "a decent amount of inter-species rape occurred"?

I assume you think that Neanderthals were doing the raping, but you'd be wrong.


Only because the Cro-Magnons came up with the slipknot. Most fit Neaderthals, studies suggest, could pull the average Cro-Magnon apart like a chicken. And if you don't like the sciency stuff, try the Slate version.

Our advantage was that of brave Sir Robin: the ability to run away.
 
2014-02-01 05:00:58 PM  

pissnmoan: HairBolus

I've never understood hariness. If it is an adaptation to cold then why are Southern Europeans more hairy than Northern Europeans? Maybe it has something to do with wearing cloths all the time (ancient Greeks were often depicted naked), and Vikings could put all their efforts into growing beards.
Xythero
A professor of mine in college had a theory that human body hair wasn't used so much for keeping warm, but to detect bugs.  When a bug lands on you it's hard to feel it's legs on your skin, but if it bumps into a hair you can detect it more easily.

Xythero wins the prize.  My information says that body hair helps us feel and then swat mosquitoes found most often in warmer climates.  However, I've nearly been eaten alive by mosquitoes several times while camped on shores of Canadian lakes.  All you body-shaved pretty boys had best start eating your quinine pills or you will catch the malaria.


There's probably a good bit of sexual selection in there, too.  A full beard and hairy chest can make even a teenager look far more manly than he truly is.  It could also be a side effect of higher testosterone/androgen levels in those populations-- leading to more urges for fighting and sexy-times.
 
2014-02-01 05:31:47 PM  

Bonzo_1116: There's probably a good bit of sexual selection in there, too. A full beard and hairy chest can make even a teenager look far more manly than he truly is. It could also be a side effect of higher testosterone/androgen levels in those populations-- leading to more urges for fighting and sexy-times.


Seems to make sense...Evolution dictates that those who can successfully reproduce might have the "better" characteristics.  That probably doesn't take into account modern humans' technological advantages, however.

I always thought this guy was part Neanderthal (or most likely at least 50% anabolic steroids):

i2.listal.com
 
2014-02-01 05:48:10 PM  

Krustofsky: I always thought this guy was part Neanderthal (or most likely at least 50% anabolic steroids):

i2.listal.com


I always thought Ron Perlman might be what person with a high percentage of Neanderthal genes might look like.

i.imgur.com

But then that would sort of typecast him

i.imgur.com
 
2014-02-01 06:05:44 PM  
I bet Neanderthal chicks were easy to impress. I'd just flash my well developed forehead and those hairy legs would fly apart.
 
2014-02-01 06:28:27 PM  

MayoSlather: I bet Neanderthal chicks were easy to impress. I'd just flash my well developed forehead and those hairy legs would fly apart.


That sounds like my experience at Berkeley.
 
2014-02-01 07:12:24 PM  
So you're saying they had cowgirl style back then...?
 
2014-02-01 07:36:08 PM  
Am I the only one who thought the article was going to link Neanderthals to counting to potato?

/Intardasting read
 
2014-02-01 08:12:12 PM  
Hairiness likely has two different factors.

In hot climates, little body hair helped humans shed excess heat better.  This is incredibly important as early humans were endurance hunters that ran down their food, and in the process, produced a lot of body heat.  This is basically the same reason humans have those weird sweat glands covering their bodies.

The second reason is sun exposure.  In extreme northern climates there is less UV radiation from the sun, and humans need that radiation to produce vitamin D.  Hair gets in the way.  It's the exact same reason Caucasians have less melanin in their skin.  Melanin absorbs the UV which is great in equatorial regions, but becomes more and more harmful as you move away from the equator.
 
2014-02-01 08:24:49 PM  
If early modern humans didnt get some neanderthal strange we wouldnt have redheads. I wouldnt want to live in a world with no ginger girls.
 
2014-02-01 10:41:49 PM  
All of you modern humans are hating on a species you know nothing about, you all must have been pencil-necked pizza-faced agriculturalists in the Domestication Club, Cro-Magnons get access to more top-shelf Neanderthal than you could shake a stick at, and the relationships you make in the Ice Age will last you a lifetime.
 
2014-02-01 10:49:56 PM  
 
2014-02-01 11:22:33 PM  

Kurmudgeon: Ahh, come on, you'd do her!
[www.flixist.com image 620x350]


Actually, when I first saw her on a TV at a department store, my reaction was that she looks just like one of my ex-girlfriends, except a bit more apelike.

So... uh... Yeah.
 
2014-02-01 11:45:28 PM  
Still does.
 
2014-02-02 12:10:07 AM  

HairBolus: FTFA:
The teams looked for Neanderthal genes that were especially common in contemporary humans, a sign that the genes were useful to their new owners. Both groups identified a series of genes involved in the inner workings of cells called keratinocytes, which make up most of the outer layer of human skin and produce hair.
"It's tempting to speculate that Neanderthals were already adapted to colder environments in Eurasia" and that these genes helped modern humans to cope after they arrived from Africa,

I've never understood hariness. If it is an adaptation to cold then why are Southern Europeans more hairy than Northern Europeans? Maybe it has something to do with wearing cloths all the time (ancient Greeks were often depicted naked), and Vikings could put all their efforts into growing beards.

Are there legit studies on which Europeans are the most/least body-hairy and beard-hairy? If it turns out that say Bulgarians are the hariest do they also have the most other Neanderthal genes?


The hairs are there not for warmth but so you can feel the lice moving and remove them. the more lice in the population, the more hair.
 
2014-02-02 12:26:35 AM  

theorellior: All of you modern humans are hating on a species you know nothing about, you all must have been pencil-necked pizza-faced agriculturalists in the Domestication Club, Cro-Magnons get access to more top-shelf Neanderthal than you could shake a stick at, and the relationships you make in the Ice Age will last you a lifetime.


i172.photobucket.com
 
2014-02-02 10:10:31 AM  
So, that's how inter-species babby was formed...
 
2014-02-02 06:05:44 PM  
www.democratic-republicans.us

/hey there...
 
2014-02-02 11:44:38 PM  
www.talltalestruetales.com
 
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