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(Slate)   Obama names Navy Vice Admiral to head the NSA, hopes a former sailor can finally stop all the leaks   (slate.com ) divider line
    More: Interesting, President Obama, Navy Vice Admiral, NSA, navies, vice admirals, Cyber Command, sailors  
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644 clicks; posted to Politics » on 01 Feb 2014 at 10:45 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



39 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-02-01 10:52:46 AM  
I'd rather he right the ship. Or scuttle it.
 
2014-02-01 10:53:23 AM  
This is good news. The NSA will be unable to actually look at any of the data because all the analysts will be too busy sweeping, scrubbing, and re-painting the data centers.

/former filthy blueshirt
 
2014-02-01 10:53:51 AM  
No

Strings

Attached.
 
2014-02-01 10:55:59 AM  
The ever more blatant organizational incest between the military and intelligence communities (because 9/11!!!11) is growing quite worrisome. When we see the head of the DEA or ATF go to or come from those branches regularly is when we know it'll be time to pack it in.
 
2014-02-01 11:00:39 AM  
Would it have been more appropriate to post a Rear Admiral so the NSA will stop farking us in the ass?
 
2014-02-01 11:01:51 AM  

Jensaarai: The ever more blatant organizational incest between the military and intelligence communities (because 9/11!!!11) is growing quite worrisome. When we see the head of the DEA or ATF go to or come from those branches regularly is when we know it'll be time to pack it in.


The NSA is organized under the DOD, why shouldn't they be overseen by military personnel?
 
2014-02-01 11:03:28 AM  
Obama rejected the proposal concluding that the functions of surveillance and cyberwar were too interrelated to be divided, according to the Times.

that's BS or should be. once again obama has let us down. i wanted to but there's no way i'm voting for him again.
 
2014-02-01 11:08:13 AM  

SN1987a goes boom: Jensaarai: The ever more blatant organizational incest between the military and intelligence communities (because 9/11!!!11) is growing quite worrisome. When we see the head of the DEA or ATF go to or come from those branches regularly is when we know it'll be time to pack it in.

The NSA is organized under the DOD, why shouldn't they be overseen by military personnel?


It was better when the FBI had to use U.S. mail to send the CIA 9/11 intelligence because their computers used incompatible file formats.

/true story bro
 
2014-02-01 11:08:22 AM  

Jensaarai: The ever more blatant organizational incest between the military and intelligence communities (because 9/11!!!11) is growing quite worrisome. When we see the head of the DEA or ATF go to or come from those branches regularly is when we know it'll be time to pack it in.


about that, every NSA director ever has been in the military. Also, the DEA and ATF are law enforcement, not intelligence organization.
 
2014-02-01 11:10:16 AM  

AliceBToklasLives: SN1987a goes boom: Jensaarai: The ever more blatant organizational incest between the military and intelligence communities (because 9/11!!!11) is growing quite worrisome. When we see the head of the DEA or ATF go to or come from those branches regularly is when we know it'll be time to pack it in.

The NSA is organized under the DOD, why shouldn't they be overseen by military personnel?

It was better when the FBI had to use U.S. mail to send the CIA 9/11 intelligence because their computers used incompatible file formats.

/true story bro


I'm not sure what that has to do with my response, the original statement, or anything in general.  It seems like a non-sequitur.
 
2014-02-01 11:14:43 AM  

incendi: This is good news. The NSA will be unable to actually look at any of the data because all the analysts will be too busy sweeping, scrubbing, and re-painting the data centers.

/former filthy blueshirt


Been there, done that.  You hit the nail on the head!
 
2014-02-01 11:17:52 AM  
There is nothing wrong with looking to the Navy, even the Admiralty for computer science expertise.

one famous and influential early computer scientist was Grace Murray Hopper , a rear admiral in the USN.  She popularized machine independent programming languages.

upload.wikimedia.org

So I find nothing especially untoward in using Naval personal in a field that relies intensely on computer science.

/now I'll risk tearing down your new found respect for the Navy by mentioning she was involved in the development of COBOL
 
2014-02-01 11:18:36 AM  

SN1987a goes boom: AliceBToklasLives: SN1987a goes boom: Jensaarai: The ever more blatant organizational incest between the military and intelligence communities (because 9/11!!!11) is growing quite worrisome. When we see the head of the DEA or ATF go to or come from those branches regularly is when we know it'll be time to pack it in.

The NSA is organized under the DOD, why shouldn't they be overseen by military personnel?

It was better when the FBI had to use U.S. mail to send the CIA 9/11 intelligence because their computers used incompatible file formats.

/true story bro

I'm not sure what that has to do with my response, the original statement, or anything in general.  It seems like a non-sequitur.


I dunno, interagency cooperation/coordination I guess - it seemed like the OP wanted a former Secretary of Education or something to oversee the NSA.  Haven't had coffee yet, so maybe I misread intent.
 
2014-02-01 11:18:59 AM  

Jensaarai: The ever more blatant organizational incest between the military and intelligence communities (because 9/11!!!11) is growing quite worrisome. When we see the head of the DEA or ATF go to or come from those branches regularly is when we know it'll be time to pack it in.


The NSA is, in fact, an agency of the Department of Defense, and the head of the NSA has been a uniformed officer of one of the armed forces (usually Air Force or Navy) since it's inception. The NRO (National Reconnaissance Office, our friendly eyes in the sky) also is usually, but not always, run by someone in uniform. The CIA is, usually, a political appointment (see Bush, George Herbert Walker). DEA and ATF and FBI appointments will likely come from major police forces or political allies of the President who served as prosecutors, and the same with Homeland Security.
 
2014-02-01 11:34:55 AM  
Wierd listening to 6 months in a Leaky Boat by Split Enz right now.
 
2014-02-01 11:45:54 AM  
Yes. That is the problem. My point is ever having military guys in charge of intelligence was a bad farking call, and the incest between intelligence, military, and law enforcement agencies is growing, right at the time when we need to put some big barriers between em. If Obama cared at all about rolling things back, he would have put a non-military guy in charge of the NSA. He would have broken with tradition.

Instead the guy who decided it was a good idea to put the head of the CIA in charge of the DOD is showing everyone he plans to stay the course. Established crossover is sacrosanct. Current crossover will become expected. Future crossover is to be expected. There is no rolling it back.

It's sick.

So again, my point is, as the incestuous relationships grow, we'll know we're farked when it finally formalizes itself by infecting civilian law enforcement completely. It's already happening. Once the career path is formalized at the top, we're farked.
 
2014-02-01 11:50:03 AM  
Unless, of course, anyone here thinks having certain top intelligence positions default to uniformed officers, or having a revolving door between one and the other is a good idea.

Remember, you have to defend the policies this has resulted in if you think so.
 
2014-02-01 12:04:43 PM  

Jensaarai: Unless, of course, anyone here thinks having certain top intelligence positions default to uniformed officers, or having a revolving door between one and the other is a good idea.

Remember, you have to defend the policies this has resulted in if you think so.


Intel has always been in the domain of the military. The crossover is bad, but it's the crossing out of the military that's the problem.

As far as the policies, the things most people are objecting to (hoovering up ALL THE INTERWEBZ and not calling it spying 'til you look at the data) is a natural extension of how sigint has been handled since we started listening to enemy radio transmissions. It's gone too far, but it's not hard to understand how it got there, and that the guy in charge of a military agency wears a uniform has little to do with whether it's right or wrong.
 
2014-02-01 12:17:21 PM  

Jensaarai: The ever more blatant organizational incest between the military and intelligence communities (because 9/11!!!11) is growing quite worrisome. When we see the head of the DEA or ATF go to or come from those branches regularly is when we know it'll be time to pack it in.


If I recall correctly, the head of the NSA has almost always been either a retired or active duty military officer.
 
2014-02-01 12:18:28 PM  

Jensaarai: Unless, of course, anyone here thinks having certain top intelligence positions default to uniformed officers, or having a revolving door between one and the other is a good idea.

Remember, you have to defend the policies this has resulted in if you think so.


The CIA has had almost exclusively civilian leadership. This civilian leadership resulted in torture and assassinations. Maybe they need more military influence, not less.
 
2014-02-01 12:27:43 PM  
Oh he'll have ways of plugging leaking places alright.
 
2014-02-01 12:29:54 PM  

incendi: This is good news. The NSA will be unable to actually look at any of the data because all the analysts will be too busy sweeping, scrubbing, and re-painting the data centers.

/former filthy blueshirt


Field work to Field Day!

/still can't look at a hand broom without PTSD flashbacks to eight hour field day while underway on the SSN Neversail
 
2014-02-01 12:32:27 PM  
Rogers, like Alexander before him, will also take the reigns as the head of the four-year-old Cyber Command

Excellent!

2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2014-02-01 01:10:59 PM  

Robin Hoodie: Jensaarai: Unless, of course, anyone here thinks having certain top intelligence positions default to uniformed officers, or having a revolving door between one and the other is a good idea.

Remember, you have to defend the policies this has resulted in if you think so.

The CIA has had almost exclusively civilian leadership. This civilian leadership resulted in torture and assassinations. Maybe they need more military influence, not less.


Good point.

Let's do a swap. Assign a prominent civil rights lawyer to head the NSA, and then assign a uniformed military officer to the CIA.

/we're half way there!
 
2014-02-01 01:31:06 PM  
Never ask a Navy man if he wants another drink.
 
2014-02-01 01:37:21 PM  
So, they're replacing that armchair general.
 
2014-02-01 01:52:06 PM  
Same shiat, different liar.
 
2014-02-01 01:56:39 PM  

Jensaarai: The ever more blatant organizational incest between the military and intelligence communities (because 9/11!!!11) is growing quite worrisome. When we see the head of the DEA or ATF go to or come from those branches regularly is when we know it'll be time to pack it in.


Are you farking daft?  The 'darkest times' in the history of the NSA came when it was run by a bureaucrat.  It's traditionally been run by someone from the armed forces because they cater to all of them, so having someone familiar with the way armed forces operates keeps communication efficient.  It was a farking mess when the non-military member ran the show.

The Secret Sentry, go read it.
 
2014-02-01 01:59:55 PM  

Jensaarai: The ever more blatant organizational incest between the military and intelligence communities (because 9/11!!!11) is growing quite worrisome. When we see the head of the DEA or ATF go to or come from those branches regularly is when we know it'll be time to pack it in.


Call me crazy, but I would be more concerned if the military and intelligence weren't working together.
 
2014-02-01 02:11:28 PM  

jjorsett: Same shiat, different liar.


Both sides are bad, so vote Merchant Marine.
 
2014-02-01 02:30:23 PM  

LoneWolf343: Jensaarai: The ever more blatant organizational incest between the military and intelligence communities (because 9/11!!!11) is growing quite worrisome. When we see the head of the DEA or ATF go to or come from those branches regularly is when we know it'll be time to pack it in.

Call me crazy, but I would be more concerned if the military and intelligence weren't working together.


The NSA is an agency of the DoD.  Most of the operators and analysts working at NSA are enlisted members of the military.

Also, reporting on the NSA is terrible.  Everyone is taking the word of a dude that is essentially a conspiracy theorist with the same level of rationality one would expect from a Truther or a Birther who is selectively releasing information as he sees fit to confirm his preconceptions, and he is receiving great complicity from an industry of sensationalism that can't wait to sell you some outrage.  And why the fark does he keep releasing information about how we spy on governments like the Russians and the Chinese?  Some of the worst human rights abusers in the world, and on his supposed civil liberties crusade he's just tossing those out there for... what reason?
 
2014-02-01 02:37:49 PM  

ZipSplat: LoneWolf343: Jensaarai: The ever more blatant organizational incest between the military and intelligence communities (because 9/11!!!11) is growing quite worrisome. When we see the head of the DEA or ATF go to or come from those branches regularly is when we know it'll be time to pack it in.

Call me crazy, but I would be more concerned if the military and intelligence weren't working together.

The NSA is an agency of the DoD.  Most of the operators and analysts working at NSA are enlisted members of the military.

Also, reporting on the NSA is terrible.  Everyone is taking the word of a dude that is essentially a conspiracy theorist with the same level of rationality one would expect from a Truther or a Birther who is selectively releasing information as he sees fit to confirm his preconceptions, and he is receiving great complicity from an industry of sensationalism that can't wait to sell you some outrage.  And why the fark does he keep releasing information about how we spy on governments like the Russians and the Chinese?  Some of the worst human rights abusers in the world, and on his supposed civil liberties crusade he's just tossing those out there for... what reason?


From the second link: "The theft and publication of secret documents, as my new book, The Snowden Operation, argues, is not a heroic campaign but reckless self-indulgence, with disastrous consequences." Your source is an ad.
 
2014-02-01 03:51:03 PM  
 Yes, because the leaks are what everyone has a problem with right now.  Awesome.
 
2014-02-01 04:24:45 PM  
I hope the leaks stop, it's scary to hear what the NSA does...I'd rather it stay a mystery, like the female orgasm
 
2014-02-01 04:48:25 PM  

Vlad_the_Inaner: There is nothing wrong with looking to the Navy, even the Admiralty for computer science expertise.

one famous and influential early computer scientist was Grace Murray Hopper , a rear admiral in the USN.  She popularized machine independent programming languages.

[upload.wikimedia.org image 220x275]

So I find nothing especially untoward in using Naval personal in a field that relies intensely on computer science.

/now I'll risk tearing down your new found respect for the Navy by mentioning she was involved in the development of COBOL


Navies have always had an intense interest in all things computational. Makes hitting things with explody fast things, Figuring out where you are, where the other guys are, and where the ground is much easier.
 
2014-02-01 04:56:44 PM  

LoneWolf343: From the second link: "The theft and publication of secret documents, as my new book, The Snowden Operation, argues, is not a heroic campaign but reckless self-indulgence, with disastrous consequences." Your source is an ad.


*Gasp*, a journalist writing books... well there goes that argument.
 
2014-02-01 05:48:55 PM  
Obama just fills whatever holes he can with seamen.  It's terrible really.
 
2014-02-01 11:11:43 PM  

ZipSplat: LoneWolf343: From the second link: "The theft and publication of secret documents, as my new book, The Snowden Operation, argues, is not a heroic campaign but reckless self-indulgence, with disastrous consequences." Your source is an ad.

*Gasp*, a journalist writing books... well there goes that argument.


Hmm, and for a minute there I thought you had something to say that was worth hearing. Guess I was wrong.
 
2014-02-02 03:11:30 PM  

LoneWolf343: ZipSplat: LoneWolf343: From the second link: "The theft and publication of secret documents, as my new book, The Snowden Operation, argues, is not a heroic campaign but reckless self-indulgence, with disastrous consequences." Your source is an ad.

*Gasp*, a journalist writing books... well there goes that argument.

Hmm, and for a minute there I thought you had something to say that was worth hearing. Guess I was wrong.


Just so we're clear, your counterpoint to my point of view is that it is written by a journalist who mentions that the article is based on a short ebook that further elaborates on his viewpoint which he is selling for 99 cents.
 
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