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(Toronto Sun)   Priceless Stradivarius violin stolen, $100,000 reward offered. No strings attached   (torontosun.com) divider line 98
    More: Followup, Antonio Stradivari  
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2451 clicks; posted to Main » on 01 Feb 2014 at 1:30 AM (28 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-01-31 11:54:01 PM
The 300-year-old Stradivarius was stolen from violinist Frank Almond on Monday night by thieves who shot the musician with an electric stun gun after he had completed a performance with the instrument in suburban Milwaukee

That violin was stolen by people who knew exactly what it was worth and it's likely on the way to some Russian oligarch's estate at this very moment, because he can pay more than it's worth on the open market "just because."  He'll probably train a siberian bear to play it.
 
2014-02-01 12:04:10 AM
MILWAUKEE - An anonymous donor on Friday offered to pay a $100,000 reward

Its anonymous owner had loaned the violin indefinitely to Almond.


Heh.
 
2014-02-01 12:06:36 AM

Lsherm: That violin was stolen by people who knew exactly what it was worth and it's likely on the way to some Russian oligarch's estate at this very moment, because he can pay more than it's worth on the open market "just because."  He'll probably train a siberian bear to play it.


Yeah... that wasn't even a little bit random

/it's either a paying buyer, or ransom
 
2014-02-01 12:12:54 AM

Lsherm: He'll probably train a siberian bear to play it.


www.fiddlingaround.co.uk
 
2014-02-01 01:26:24 AM
Tossed the case and cell because tracking devices.
Scanned the box, determined all original and no additional and minimal criminal women will be singing  hymnals to sustain the deranged arranged getaways to layaways and castaways and it got delivered to the appointed and anointed adjoined persons of interest that prepaid and waylaid the original owner of said instrument of musical destruction.
 
2014-02-01 01:32:32 AM

Lsherm: The 300-year-old Stradivarius was stolen from violinist Frank Almond on Monday night by thieves who shot the musician with an electric stun gun


Ohhh, bad form, 101. Bad form indeed.
 
2014-02-01 01:37:01 AM

Lsherm: The 300-year-old Stradivarius was stolen from violinist Frank Almond on Monday night by thieves who shot the musician with an electric stun gun after he had completed a performance with the instrument in suburban Milwaukee

That violin was stolen by people who knew exactly what it was worth and it's likely on the way to some Russian oligarch's estate at this very moment, because he can pay more than it's worth on the open market "just because."  He'll probably train a siberian bear to play it.


Or his minigiraffe
 
2014-02-01 01:42:10 AM
Nice headline, subbyboomer. I'll bet you just flew in from Pasadena and boy are your arms tired.
 
2014-02-01 01:42:53 AM
Quit your fretting!

Oh, wait...
 
2014-02-01 01:43:48 AM

Lsherm: The 300-year-old Stradivarius was stolen from violinist Frank Almond on Monday night by thieves who shot the musician with an electric stun gun after he had completed a performance with the instrument in suburban Milwaukee

That violin was stolen by people who knew exactly what it was worth and it's likely on the way to some Russian oligarch's estate at this very moment, because he can pay more than it's worth on the open market "just because."  He'll probably train a siberian bear to play it.


Not sure if the person who paid to have it taken is Russian or not, but it smacks of a professional job, specific target and they likely watched him and and planned just when and how to strike and how to get it out of the country.

to make a guess they took it by boat to Canada via lake Michigan to Lake Huron then smuggled through and out of Canada, they probably even had an empty Violin case ready and waiting after the snatch.

Sadly that Strad probably will not see the light of day again.
 
2014-02-01 01:45:37 AM
I had a great aunt who used to say "If there are no strings attached, there are chains attached".

Truly a wise woman.
 
2014-02-01 01:48:28 AM
And yes. This reeks of a pro job. I do have to wonder why they used a stun gun instead of flat out killing the guy.

Professional courtesy?
 
2014-02-01 01:49:55 AM
Why do they let people just walk around with these things?  Hundreds of years old and a multimillion dollar price tag and they just take it with them when they leave like it was a gym bag?
 
2014-02-01 01:51:24 AM

Lsherm: The 300-year-old Stradivarius was stolen from violinist Frank Almond on Monday night by thieves who shot the musician with an electric stun gun after he had completed a performance with the instrument in suburban Milwaukee

That violin was stolen by people who knew exactly what it was worth and it's likely on the way to some Russian oligarch's estate at this very moment, because he can pay more than it's worth on the open market "just because."  He'll probably train a siberian bear to play it.


I figured as much, given the price and obscurity of the violin, but part of me really hopes they catch some meth-head trying to sell the thing for fifty bucks at a pawn shop in a plaza between a liquor store and check-cashing place. It would just be hilarious when the cops pick up the guy and tell him how much it was actually worth.
 
2014-02-01 01:51:54 AM

grimlock1972: Not sure if the person who paid to have it taken is Russian or not,


I think you do know for sure.  Awfully close to that border crossing, aren't you?
 
2014-02-01 01:54:21 AM

viscountalpha: And yes. This reeks of a pro job. I do have to wonder why they used a stun gun instead of flat out killing the guy.

Professional courtesy?


My guess it's that murder would be a biatch to clean up quicker, so they just relied on knocking the guy out with the stun gun.
 
2014-02-01 01:56:53 AM

Captain James T. Smirk: I figured as much, given the price and obscurity of the violin, but part of me really hopes they catch some meth-head trying to sell the thing for fifty bucks at a pawn shop in a plaza between a liquor store and check-cashing place. It would just be hilarious when the cops pick up the guy and tell him how much it was actually worth.


What farking meth head targets a concert violinist exiting a concert hall with a taser?

Here's a meth robbery:

Methead:  I need meth.  I have no money.  I need money.
Methhead:  That car has 35 cents in the cupholder.  I can see it through the window.  I CAN SEE IT THROUGH THE WINDOW!
Other Methhead:  That window is dirty, is that 35 cents?  What is that guy doing?
Methhead (breaking window):  THERE'S A BONNIE TYLER CD IN THE GLOVE BOX!  THAT'S WORTH $134!
Other Methhead:  That guy has a Bonnie Tyler CD! I'm going to kill him for the money.
 
2014-02-01 01:57:33 AM

Captain James T. Smirk: Lsherm: The 300-year-old Stradivarius was stolen from violinist Frank Almond on Monday night by thieves who shot the musician with an electric stun gun after he had completed a performance with the instrument in suburban Milwaukee

That violin was stolen by people who knew exactly what it was worth and it's likely on the way to some Russian oligarch's estate at this very moment, because he can pay more than it's worth on the open market "just because."  He'll probably train a siberian bear to play it.

I figured as much, given the price and obscurity of the violin, but part of me really hopes they catch some meth-head trying to sell the thing for fifty bucks at a pawn shop in a plaza between a liquor store and check-cashing place. It would just be hilarious when the cops pick up the guy and tell him how much it was actually worth.


I know the expert said its priceless and worth a farking fortune, but I've got overhead here and the shop and employees to pay, Ill give you 20 bucks for it.
 
Poe
2014-02-01 01:58:56 AM

Eltardo: Why do they let people just walk around with these things?  Hundreds of years old and a multimillion dollar price tag and they just take it with them when they leave like it was a gym bag?


Indeed.  If I was in the posession of a musical instrument that has it's own wikipedia article, I would be transporting it with an armed escort.
 
2014-02-01 01:59:19 AM

whidbey: Nice headline, subbyboomer. I'll bet you just flew in from Pasadena and boy are your arms tired.


Man, why you gotta be like that?
 
2014-02-01 02:00:11 AM

CygnusDarius: viscountalpha: And yes. This reeks of a pro job. I do have to wonder why they used a stun gun instead of flat out killing the guy.

Professional courtesy?

My guess it's that murder would be a biatch to clean up quicker, so they just relied on knocking the guy out with the stun gun.


Because it's assault and robbery, not a murder investigation. Fewer resources devotes, quicker to go cold.
 
2014-02-01 02:02:12 AM

Eltardo: Why do they let people just walk around with these things?  Hundreds of years old and a multimillion dollar price tag and they just take it with them when they leave like it was a gym bag?


This.  Dude should have had two bodyguards with him at all times, including before, during, and after performances.
 
2014-02-01 02:07:17 AM

MattyBlast: Eltardo: Why do they let people just walk around with these things?  Hundreds of years old and a multimillion dollar price tag and they just take it with them when they leave like it was a gym bag?

This.  Dude should have had two bodyguards with him at all times, including before, during, and after performances.


They're lucky enough to get loaned one of these instruments by a benefactor. They worry about them all the time. But nobody but a professional knows what they're worth and I think this case bears this out. I'm guessing the instrument will be sold for 10% its value to some rich dick who'll keep it in their basement forever. Nobody's going to play such a hot instrument again.
 
2014-02-01 02:15:39 AM

MattyBlast: Eltardo: Why do they let people just walk around with these things?  Hundreds of years old and a multimillion dollar price tag and they just take it with them when they leave like it was a gym bag?

This.  Dude should have had two bodyguards with him at all times, including before, during, and after performances.



was it insured?
 
2014-02-01 02:15:56 AM
I prefer the Fender Strats before they started making them in Japan.
 
2014-02-01 02:18:07 AM

Lsherm: grimlock1972: Not sure if the person who paid to have it taken is Russian or not,

I think you do know for sure.  Awfully close to that border crossing, aren't you?


LOL  Not really I am an  hour away fro Fargo, North Dakota.

Also i would never deprieve the world of hear the melodious sounds of a Strad.
 
2014-02-01 02:21:08 AM
Mr. Wednesday and Low-Key Lyesmith inconsolable.
 
2014-02-01 02:22:51 AM

Mentalpatient87: The 300-year-old Stradivarius was stolen from violinist Frank Almond on Monday night by thieves who shot the musician with an electric stun gun


As opposed to a geothermal stun gun?

Also, I understand that the Stradivarius violins are priceless instruments... but I'm willing to bet that if professional violin afficiandos were to take the Pepsi Challenge, they couldn't tell the difference between a Stradivarius violin and a regular violin made with modern-day materials.

How much of the violin is still original, anyway? After 300 years none of the strings needed replacing? It hasn't taken any wear-and-tear over the past few centuries that would maybe require it to be repaired?

If it's a work of art, it needs to be preserved and cared for as a work of art. If it's going to actually be played, then don't be surprised if this shiat happens.
 
2014-02-01 02:25:05 AM
As a violinist, and as someone who would dearly love to see a Strad played live by someone worthy of it (someday, Joshua Bell...), this theft is really upsetting to me.  There are so few Strads left, and most are either sitting in museums, or the biggest travesty of all, in private collectors' vaults never to be heard and enjoyed as they should be.

Whoever stun gunned Almond and took the violin clearly know what it is and what it's worth, or they were hired by someone who does.  Such a tragedy.
 
2014-02-01 02:28:06 AM

WraithSama: As a violinist, and as someone who would dearly love to see a Strad played live by someone worthy of it (someday, Joshua Bell...), this theft is really upsetting to me.  There are so few Strads left, and most are either sitting in museums, or the biggest travesty of all, in private collectors' vaults never to be heard and enjoyed as they should be.

Whoever stun gunned Almond and took the violin clearly know what it is and what it's worth, or they were hired by someone who does.  Such a tragedy.


Itzhak Perlman plays a Stradivarius

/I am an atheist, but when I hear him play I hear angels singing
 
2014-02-01 02:31:24 AM

Weatherkiss: Mentalpatient87: The 300-year-old Stradivarius was stolen from violinist Frank Almond on Monday night by thieves who shot the musician with an electric stun gun

As opposed to a geothermal stun gun?

Also, I understand that the Stradivarius violins are priceless instruments... but I'm willing to bet that if professional violin afficiandos were to take the Pepsi Challenge, they couldn't tell the difference between a Stradivarius violin and a regular violin made with modern-day materials.

How much of the violin is still original, anyway? After 300 years none of the strings needed replacing? It hasn't taken any wear-and-tear over the past few centuries that would maybe require it to be repaired?

If it's a work of art, it needs to be preserved and cared for as a work of art. If it's going to actually be played, then don't be surprised if this shiat happens.


Most of it should still be original.  Of course strings need to be replaced, and that does affect the tone, but the wood itself is the biggest factor of the sound; the shape, the quality, the finish--and it improves in quality as it ages.  Any repairs that need to be done to the body itself, in the hands of a skilled luthier (and I can't imagine a Strad being taken to anyone but the best), should not affect tonal quality or color.
 
2014-02-01 02:36:20 AM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: WraithSama: As a violinist, and as someone who would dearly love to see a Strad played live by someone worthy of it (someday, Joshua Bell...), this theft is really upsetting to me.  There are so few Strads left, and most are either sitting in museums, or the biggest travesty of all, in private collectors' vaults never to be heard and enjoyed as they should be.

Whoever stun gunned Almond and took the violin clearly know what it is and what it's worth, or they were hired by someone who does.  Such a tragedy.

Itzhak Perlman plays a Stradivarius

/I am an atheist, but when I hear him play I hear angels singing


I know!  He's amazing.  I don't have the long, slender fingers common among most violinists.  I can't play two sequential notes a half-step apart without moving the first finger.  It's a pain I've learned to live with--just like him, I understand.
 
2014-02-01 02:41:09 AM

WraithSama: Weatherkiss: Mentalpatient87: The 300-year-old Stradivarius was stolen from violinist Frank Almond on Monday night by thieves who shot the musician with an electric stun gun

As opposed to a geothermal stun gun?

Also, I understand that the Stradivarius violins are priceless instruments... but I'm willing to bet that if professional violin afficiandos were to take the Pepsi Challenge, they couldn't tell the difference between a Stradivarius violin and a regular violin made with modern-day materials.

How much of the violin is still original, anyway? After 300 years none of the strings needed replacing? It hasn't taken any wear-and-tear over the past few centuries that would maybe require it to be repaired?

If it's a work of art, it needs to be preserved and cared for as a work of art. If it's going to actually be played, then don't be surprised if this shiat happens.

Most of it should still be original.  Of course strings need to be replaced, and that does affect the tone, but the wood itself is the biggest factor of the sound; the shape, the quality, the finish--and it improves in quality as it ages.  Any repairs that need to be done to the body itself, in the hands of a skilled luthier (and I can't imagine a Strad being taken to anyone but the best), should not affect tonal quality or color.


I'm a lay person so I don't know anything about violins. It just seems like Stradivarius violins give a placebo effect to one's ears. They hear a difference because they want to hear a difference. I think it'd have more to do with the musician's skill and talent than the instrument itself. And if attention is called to the instrument, that's less emphasis called to the musician playing it.

Like the Royal Shakespeare Company saying that the skull of André Tchaikowsky isn't used in productions of Hamlet because the audience spends more time looking at the prop than the actor performing. Even though it is.
 
2014-02-01 02:41:35 AM

Weatherkiss: Mentalpatient87: The 300-year-old Stradivarius was stolen from violinist Frank Almond on Monday night by thieves who shot the musician with an electric stun gun

As opposed to a geothermal stun gun?

Also, I understand that the Stradivarius violins are priceless instruments... but I'm willing to bet that if professional violin afficiandos were to take the Pepsi Challenge, they couldn't tell the difference between a Stradivarius violin and a regular violin made with modern-day materials.

How much of the violin is still original, anyway? After 300 years none of the strings needed replacing? It hasn't taken any wear-and-tear over the past few centuries that would maybe require it to be repaired?

If it's a work of art, it needs to be preserved and cared for as a work of art. If it's going to actually be played, then don't be surprised if this shiat happens.


Well I just took the pepsi challenge on Youtube and I sort of failed. The modern new carbon fibre violin Sucked and I easily picked it put.

I actually guessed the vintage circa 1900 German Violin (which is a quality instrument but nowheres near the value of a Stradivarius) was the Stradivarius.
 
2014-02-01 02:43:49 AM
It's being delivered to Vault 92 as we speak.

www.fallout-archives.com
 
2014-02-01 02:45:15 AM

Oldiron_79: Weatherkiss: Mentalpatient87: The 300-year-old Stradivarius was stolen from violinist Frank Almond on Monday night by thieves who shot the musician with an electric stun gun

As opposed to a geothermal stun gun?

Also, I understand that the Stradivarius violins are priceless instruments... but I'm willing to bet that if professional violin afficiandos were to take the Pepsi Challenge, they couldn't tell the difference between a Stradivarius violin and a regular violin made with modern-day materials.

How much of the violin is still original, anyway? After 300 years none of the strings needed replacing? It hasn't taken any wear-and-tear over the past few centuries that would maybe require it to be repaired?

If it's a work of art, it needs to be preserved and cared for as a work of art. If it's going to actually be played, then don't be surprised if this shiat happens.

Well I just took the pepsi challenge on Youtube and I sort of failed. The modern new carbon fibre violin Sucked and I easily picked it put.

I actually guessed the vintage circa 1900 German Violin (which is a quality instrument but nowheres near the value of a Stradivarius) was the Stradivarius.


Apparently there's a Wiki page on a double-blind test regarding violins.
 
2014-02-01 02:47:38 AM

WraithSama: MaudlinMutantMollusk: WraithSama: As a violinist, and as someone who would dearly love to see a Strad played live by someone worthy of it (someday, Joshua Bell...), this theft is really upsetting to me.  There are so few Strads left, and most are either sitting in museums, or the biggest travesty of all, in private collectors' vaults never to be heard and enjoyed as they should be.

Whoever stun gunned Almond and took the violin clearly know what it is and what it's worth, or they were hired by someone who does.  Such a tragedy.

Itzhak Perlman plays a Stradivarius

/I am an atheist, but when I hear him play I hear angels singing

I know!  He's amazing.  I don't have the long, slender fingers common among most violinists.  I can't play two sequential notes a half-step apart without moving the first finger.  It's a pain I've learned to live with--just like him, I understand.


Well, then... we deserve a bit of Itzhak
 
2014-02-01 02:51:58 AM

Ryker's Peninsula: I prefer the Fender Strats before they started making them in Japan.


And Mexico, and sullying the brand by making the "Squire" series.
 
2014-02-01 02:58:26 AM

Weatherkiss: Oldiron_79: Weatherkiss: Mentalpatient87: The 300-year-old Stradivarius was stolen from violinist Frank Almond on Monday night by thieves who shot the musician with an electric stun gun

As opposed to a geothermal stun gun?

Also, I understand that the Stradivarius violins are priceless instruments... but I'm willing to bet that if professional violin afficiandos were to take the Pepsi Challenge, they couldn't tell the difference between a Stradivarius violin and a regular violin made with modern-day materials.

How much of the violin is still original, anyway? After 300 years none of the strings needed replacing? It hasn't taken any wear-and-tear over the past few centuries that would maybe require it to be repaired?

If it's a work of art, it needs to be preserved and cared for as a work of art. If it's going to actually be played, then don't be surprised if this shiat happens.

Well I just took the pepsi challenge on Youtube and I sort of failed. The modern new carbon fibre violin Sucked and I easily picked it put.

I actually guessed the vintage circa 1900 German Violin (which is a quality instrument but nowheres near the value of a Stradivarius) was the Stradivarius.

Apparently there's a Wiki page on a double-blind test regarding violins.


Well It doesnt surprise me, As I said I guessed the 1900 German Lion's Head was the Stradivarius.

The carbon fibre modern sucked, it sounded as different as if they was playing a tuba instead of another violin.
 
2014-02-01 02:58:32 AM
The 2nd sentence of the headline made me laff. Cheers subby.

Cool Violin Story, Bros:
One of my sisters owned a violin back when we were all at school. One day our house got burgled by a couple homeless teenagers. Did a bit of vandalism as well as stealing, the little carnts.

When they stumbled across my sister's violin they went all El Kabong on its ass. I had to give 'em props for that one.

i57.tinypic.com
/CVSB
 
2014-02-01 02:58:40 AM
Over under on anonymous donor/anonymous owner/violin robbery client being the same people? Its gotta be worth some insurance money.
 
2014-02-01 03:00:49 AM

Oldiron_79: Weatherkiss: Oldiron_79: Weatherkiss: Mentalpatient87: The 300-year-old Stradivarius was stolen from violinist Frank Almond on Monday night by thieves who shot the musician with an electric stun gun

As opposed to a geothermal stun gun?

Also, I understand that the Stradivarius violins are priceless instruments... but I'm willing to bet that if professional violin afficiandos were to take the Pepsi Challenge, they couldn't tell the difference between a Stradivarius violin and a regular violin made with modern-day materials.

How much of the violin is still original, anyway? After 300 years none of the strings needed replacing? It hasn't taken any wear-and-tear over the past few centuries that would maybe require it to be repaired?

If it's a work of art, it needs to be preserved and cared for as a work of art. If it's going to actually be played, then don't be surprised if this shiat happens.

Well I just took the pepsi challenge on Youtube and I sort of failed. The modern new carbon fibre violin Sucked and I easily picked it put.

I actually guessed the vintage circa 1900 German Violin (which is a quality instrument but nowheres near the value of a Stradivarius) was the Stradivarius.

Apparently there's a Wiki page on a double-blind test regarding violins.

Well It doesnt surprise me, As I said I guessed the 1900 German Lion's Head was the Stradivarius.

The carbon fibre modern sucked, it sounded as different as if they was playing a tuba instead of another violin.


They should have tested Jake Busey's violin from Starship Troopers.

ladylubyanka.files.wordpress.com
 
2014-02-01 03:04:11 AM

WraithSama: As a violinist, and as someone who would dearly love to see a Strad played live by someone worthy of it (someday, Joshua Bell...), this theft is really upsetting to me.  There are so few Strads left, and most are either sitting in museums, or the biggest travesty of all, in private collectors' vaults never to be heard and enjoyed as they should be.

Whoever stun gunned Almond and took the violin clearly know what it is and what it's worth, or they were hired by someone who does.  Such a tragedy.


I find it a bit odd no one's figured out how to build a better violin yet.

We have more and better materials these days.
 
2014-02-01 03:04:19 AM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: whidbey: Nice headline, subbyboomer. I'll bet you just flew in from Pasadena and boy are your arms tired.

Man, why you gotta be like that?


Submitted links approved: 101

Dude, I'll bet a bunch of those were corny puns left over from the Eisenhower era too, weren't they?
 
2014-02-01 03:05:24 AM

whidbey: MaudlinMutantMollusk: whidbey: Nice headline, subbyboomer. I'll bet you just flew in from Pasadena and boy are your arms tired.

Man, why you gotta be like that?

Submitted links approved: 101

Dude, I'll bet a bunch of those were corny puns left over from the Eisenhower era too, weren't they?


*sigh*

/ok... have it your way
 
2014-02-01 03:05:43 AM

doglover: WraithSama: As a violinist, and as someone who would dearly love to see a Strad played live by someone worthy of it (someday, Joshua Bell...), this theft is really upsetting to me.  There are so few Strads left, and most are either sitting in museums, or the biggest travesty of all, in private collectors' vaults never to be heard and enjoyed as they should be.

Whoever stun gunned Almond and took the violin clearly know what it is and what it's worth, or they were hired by someone who does.  Such a tragedy.

I find it a bit odd no one's figured out how to build a better violin yet.

We have more and better materials these days.


I know some guy named Johnny in Georgia has one made of solid gold.
 
2014-02-01 03:18:09 AM
Is it so impossible that whoever ordered the robbery greatly esteemed the violinist and didn't want him to be hurt? I would think that a person willing to commit multiple crimes to get their hands on a Stradivarius would respect a person who could do the instrument justice.
 
2014-02-01 03:20:49 AM

Weatherkiss: doglover: WraithSama: As a violinist, and as someone who would dearly love to see a Strad played live by someone worthy of it (someday, Joshua Bell...), this theft is really upsetting to me.  There are so few Strads left, and most are either sitting in museums, or the biggest travesty of all, in private collectors' vaults never to be heard and enjoyed as they should be.

Whoever stun gunned Almond and took the violin clearly know what it is and what it's worth, or they were hired by someone who does.  Such a tragedy.

I find it a bit odd no one's figured out how to build a better violin yet.

We have more and better materials these days.

I know some guy named Johnny in Georgia has one made of solid gold.


Wouldnt it be really heavy and sound crummy?
 
2014-02-01 03:21:25 AM

Weatherkiss: Oldiron_79: Weatherkiss: Mentalpatient87: The 300-year-old Stradivarius was stolen from violinist Frank Almond on Monday night by thieves who shot the musician with an electric stun gun

As opposed to a geothermal stun gun?

Also, I understand that the Stradivarius violins are priceless instruments... but I'm willing to bet that if professional violin afficiandos were to take the Pepsi Challenge, they couldn't tell the difference between a Stradivarius violin and a regular violin made with modern-day materials.

How much of the violin is still original, anyway? After 300 years none of the strings needed replacing? It hasn't taken any wear-and-tear over the past few centuries that would maybe require it to be repaired?

If it's a work of art, it needs to be preserved and cared for as a work of art. If it's going to actually be played, then don't be surprised if this shiat happens.

Well I just took the pepsi challenge on Youtube and I sort of failed. The modern new carbon fibre violin Sucked and I easily picked it put.

I actually guessed the vintage circa 1900 German Violin (which is a quality instrument but nowheres near the value of a Stradivarius) was the Stradivarius.

Apparently there's a Wiki page on a double-blind test regarding violins.


Yeah, it's been shown in a lot of different studies that newer violins can sound just as good as older ones.  But it's all pretty nuanced, and subjective.  Some of the people critiquing the study in that article also had valid points about the newer violins being adjusted by the judges prior to the test and the older violins being used as they were given by their donors (who may have been collectors and not necessarily violinists themselves, who knows).

I grew up half an hour south of Indy, where that study and contest was, and my family still lives there.  I'm surprised I've never heard of it, I would have liked to have attended.

Here's another fascinating informal study that was done involving a Strad (link goes to YouTube video of the experiment).  Joshua Bell, a virtuoso, played his Strad in a subway terminal for an hour during the morning rush hour.  Only 1 person recognized him, and very few people stopped to listen.  It was an experiment organized by a newspaper to see if people would pause their lives to appreciate beauty.  The answer was pretty sad, heh.
 
2014-02-01 03:22:46 AM

WraithSama: Weatherkiss: Oldiron_79: Weatherkiss: Mentalpatient87: The 300-year-old Stradivarius was stolen from violinist Frank Almond on Monday night by thieves who shot the musician with an electric stun gun

As opposed to a geothermal stun gun?

Also, I understand that the Stradivarius violins are priceless instruments... but I'm willing to bet that if professional violin afficiandos were to take the Pepsi Challenge, they couldn't tell the difference between a Stradivarius violin and a regular violin made with modern-day materials.

How much of the violin is still original, anyway? After 300 years none of the strings needed replacing? It hasn't taken any wear-and-tear over the past few centuries that would maybe require it to be repaired?

If it's a work of art, it needs to be preserved and cared for as a work of art. If it's going to actually be played, then don't be surprised if this shiat happens.

Well I just took the pepsi challenge on Youtube and I sort of failed. The modern new carbon fibre violin Sucked and I easily picked it put.

I actually guessed the vintage circa 1900 German Violin (which is a quality instrument but nowheres near the value of a Stradivarius) was the Stradivarius.

Apparently there's a Wiki page on a double-blind test regarding violins.

Yeah, it's been shown in a lot of different studies that newer violins can sound just as good as older ones.  But it's all pretty nuanced, and subjective.  Some of the people critiquing the study in that article also had valid points about the newer violins being adjusted by the judges prior to the test and the older violins being used as they were given by their donors (who may have been collectors and not necessarily violinists themselves, who knows).

I grew up half an hour south of Indy, where that study and contest was, and my family still lives there.  I'm surprised I've never heard of it, I would have liked to have attended.

Here's another fascinating informal study that was done involving a Strad (link ...


That is sad. But not unexpected. I'll have to youtube this Joshua Bell guy
 
2014-02-01 03:23:36 AM

Weatherkiss: doglover: WraithSama: As a violinist, and as someone who would dearly love to see a Strad played live by someone worthy of it (someday, Joshua Bell...), this theft is really upsetting to me.  There are so few Strads left, and most are either sitting in museums, or the biggest travesty of all, in private collectors' vaults never to be heard and enjoyed as they should be.

Whoever stun gunned Almond and took the violin clearly know what it is and what it's worth, or they were hired by someone who does.  Such a tragedy.

I find it a bit odd no one's figured out how to build a better violin yet.

We have more and better materials these days.

I know some guy named Johnny in Georgia has one made of solid gold.


I'll admit, that made me laugh.
 
2014-02-01 03:25:12 AM

Oldiron_79: Weatherkiss: doglover: WraithSama: As a violinist, and as someone who would dearly love to see a Strad played live by someone worthy of it (someday, Joshua Bell...), this theft is really upsetting to me.  There are so few Strads left, and most are either sitting in museums, or the biggest travesty of all, in private collectors' vaults never to be heard and enjoyed as they should be.

Whoever stun gunned Almond and took the violin clearly know what it is and what it's worth, or they were hired by someone who does.  Such a tragedy.

I find it a bit odd no one's figured out how to build a better violin yet.

We have more and better materials these days.

I know some guy named Johnny in Georgia has one made of solid gold.

Wouldnt it be really heavy and sound crummy?


Well, it's mostly for show.

theinfosphere.org
 
2014-02-01 03:26:54 AM

grimlock1972: Lsherm: grimlock1972: Not sure if the person who paid to have it taken is Russian or not,

I think you do know for sure.  Awfully close to that border crossing, aren't you?

LOL  Not really I am an  hour away fro Fargo, North Dakota.

Also i would never deprieve the world of hear the melodious sounds of a Strad.


Well, definitely not Russian, you timed yourself to a border crossing in a city.  A farking Russian would just start walking north.
 
2014-02-01 03:28:38 AM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: /ok... have it your way


Don't ever change, MMM. You made me laugh my ass off the other day. In a good way.
 
2014-02-01 03:29:25 AM

Weatherkiss: Oldiron_79: Weatherkiss: doglover: WraithSama: As a violinist, and as someone who would dearly love to see a Strad played live by someone worthy of it (someday, Joshua Bell...), this theft is really upsetting to me.  There are so few Strads left, and most are either sitting in museums, or the biggest travesty of all, in private collectors' vaults never to be heard and enjoyed as they should be.

Whoever stun gunned Almond and took the violin clearly know what it is and what it's worth, or they were hired by someone who does.  Such a tragedy.

I find it a bit odd no one's figured out how to build a better violin yet.

We have more and better materials these days.

I know some guy named Johnny in Georgia has one made of solid gold.

Wouldnt it be really heavy and sound crummy?

Well, it's mostly for show.


So are you wanting me to sign a fiddle contest waiver?
 
2014-02-01 03:41:39 AM

whidbey: MaudlinMutantMollusk: /ok... have it your way

Don't ever change, MMM. You made me laugh my ass off the other day. In a good way.


You're an unreasoning bigot, and a hatin' little punk

/but for some reason, I like you anyway
//this is for you: one of the most beautiful places I have ever been to
img.fark.net
Look familiar?
:)
 
2014-02-01 03:47:35 AM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: one of the most beautiful places I have ever been to


indeed it is--quite a gratifying experience
 
2014-02-01 03:54:51 AM

doglover: WraithSama: As a violinist, and as someone who would dearly love to see a Strad played live by someone worthy of it (someday, Joshua Bell...), this theft is really upsetting to me.  There are so few Strads left, and most are either sitting in museums, or the biggest travesty of all, in private collectors' vaults never to be heard and enjoyed as they should be.

Whoever stun gunned Almond and took the violin clearly know what it is and what it's worth, or they were hired by someone who does.  Such a tragedy.

I find it a bit odd no one's figured out how to build a better violin yet.

We have more and better materials these days.
~


re: Lenses for the most important, biggest budget telescopes ie. the Hubble telescopes of today

A while back I read that the final "light grinding-back" and polishing of the big-assed lenses is done by humans!  Coz humans still make better lenses than any machine. That's still got me scratchin' me head.

Go team humans!
 
2014-02-01 03:56:03 AM
Yeah, they are worth a truckload, but the truth is that a quality modern violin can actually sound much better.
 
2014-02-01 04:04:32 AM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w8vwmG-h9AE&feature=youtube_gdata_play er

Itzak Perlman playing Vivaldi
 
2014-02-01 04:05:29 AM

Kevin72: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w8vwmG-h9AE&feature=youtube_gdata_pla y er

Itzak Perlman playing Vivaldi


On his Stradivarius
 
2014-02-01 04:06:27 AM

Kevin72: Kevin72: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w8vwmG-h9AE&feature=youtube_gdata_pla y er

Itzak Perlman playing Vivaldi

On his Stradivarius


Kevin go home you sre drunk
 
2014-02-01 04:11:23 AM

Kevin72: Kevin72: Kevin72: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w8vwmG-h9AE&feature=youtube_gdata_pla y er

Itzak Perlman playing Vivaldi

On his Stradivarius

Kevin go home you sre drunk


You may be drunk, but I appreciate your taste in music

/for whatever that's worth
 
2014-02-01 04:12:04 AM

Big Ramifications: doglover: WraithSama: As a violinist, and as someone who would dearly love to see a Strad played live by someone worthy of it (someday, Joshua Bell...), this theft is really upsetting to me.  There are so few Strads left, and most are either sitting in museums, or the biggest travesty of all, in private collectors' vaults never to be heard and enjoyed as they should be.

Whoever stun gunned Almond and took the violin clearly know what it is and what it's worth, or they were hired by someone who does.  Such a tragedy.

I find it a bit odd no one's figured out how to build a better violin yet.

We have more and better materials these days.
~

re: Lenses for the most important, biggest budget telescopes ie. the Hubble telescopes of today

A while back I read that the final "light grinding-back" and polishing of the big-assed lenses is done by humans!  Coz humans still make better lenses than any machine. That's still got me scratchin' me head.

Go team humans!


That's also false. Humans finish lenses better than any machine thus far. If we made lenses better, there wouldn't be mass produced glasses.
 
2014-02-01 04:12:29 AM
I read that as "Princess Stanislaus."

/not sure why.
 
2014-02-01 04:38:46 AM

Big Ramifications: doglover: WraithSama: As a violinist, and as someone who would dearly love to see a Strad played live by someone worthy of it (someday, Joshua Bell...), this theft is really upsetting to me.  There are so few Strads left, and most are either sitting in museums, or the biggest travesty of all, in private collectors' vaults never to be heard and enjoyed as they should be.

Whoever stun gunned Almond and took the violin clearly know what it is and what it's worth, or they were hired by someone who does.  Such a tragedy.

I find it a bit odd no one's figured out how to build a better violin yet.

We have more and better materials these days.
~

re: Lenses for the most important, biggest budget telescopes ie. the Hubble telescopes of today

A while back I read that the final "light grinding-back" and polishing of the big-assed lenses is done by humans!  Coz humans still make better lenses than any machine. That's still got me scratchin' me head.

Go team humans!


A violin is not a machine.

/There's quite a few steps in grinding a lense
//Polishing depends on the grind
///In diopters
 
2014-02-01 04:41:13 AM

viscountalpha: And yes. This reeks of a pro job. I do have to wonder why they used a stun gun instead of flat out killing the guy.

Professional courtesy?


If whoever paid for this job is a real classical music lover, they wouldn't want Frank Almond dead. He's apparently quite good.
 
2014-02-01 04:47:56 AM

Paris1127: viscountalpha: And yes. This reeks of a pro job. I do have to wonder why they used a stun gun instead of flat out killing the guy.

Professional courtesy?

If whoever paid for this job is a real classical music lover, they wouldn't want Frank Almond dead. He's apparently quite good.


I'm also willing to bet it's less about "Honor Among Thieves" and more about "Hey, if we get caught doing this, murder is going to be a little bit more severe than robbery when you're on trial."
 
2014-02-01 04:52:47 AM

doglover: Big Ramifications: doglover: WraithSama: As a violinist, and as someone who would dearly love to see a Strad played live by someone worthy of it (someday, Joshua Bell...), this theft is really upsetting to me.  There are so few Strads left, and most are either sitting in museums, or the biggest travesty of all, in private collectors' vaults never to be heard and enjoyed as they should be.

Whoever stun gunned Almond and took the violin clearly know what it is and what it's worth, or they were hired by someone who does.  Such a tragedy.

I find it a bit odd no one's figured out how to build a better violin yet.

We have more and better materials these days.
~

re: Lenses for the most important, biggest budget telescopes ie. the Hubble telescopes of today

A while back I read that the final "light grinding-back" and polishing of the big-assed lenses is done by humans!  Coz humans still make better lenses than any machine. That's still got me scratchin' me head.

Go team humans!

That's also false. Humans finish lenses better than any machine thus far. If we made lenses better, there wouldn't be mass produced glasses.

~

You clown. Maybe humans do make better glasses lenses as well.... but that's irrelevant, lens quality isn't the driver here.

It would cost a $$$gazillion more for humans to make them, and humans would be as slow as all fark. Pretty sure the factory owners and the ultimate paying customers are prepared to cop the 0.001% flaw rate for machines that just belt 'em out at a fraction of the cost.

A 0.001% flaw rate, I'm guessing, isn't something NASA is gonna wear, and they're prepared to spend the extra bucks.
 
2014-02-01 05:00:58 AM
At lest it wasn't a Guarneri.
 
2014-02-01 05:09:01 AM
Don't bother, it's already on a plane to China.
 
2014-02-01 05:14:40 AM

Big Ramifications: doglover: Big Ramifications: doglover: WraithSama: As a violinist, and as someone who would dearly love to see a Strad played live by someone worthy of it (someday, Joshua Bell...), this theft is really upsetting to me.  There are so few Strads left, and most are either sitting in museums, or the biggest travesty of all, in private collectors' vaults never to be heard and enjoyed as they should be.

Whoever stun gunned Almond and took the violin clearly know what it is and what it's worth, or they were hired by someone who does.  Such a tragedy.

I find it a bit odd no one's figured out how to build a better violin yet.

We have more and better materials these days.
~

re: Lenses for the most important, biggest budget telescopes ie. the Hubble telescopes of today

A while back I read that the final "light grinding-back" and polishing of the big-assed lenses is done by humans!  Coz humans still make better lenses than any machine. That's still got me scratchin' me head.

Go team humans!

That's also false. Humans finish lenses better than any machine thus far. If we made lenses better, there wouldn't be mass produced glasses.
~

You clown. Maybe humans do make better glasses lenses as well.... but that's irrelevant, lens quality isn't the driver here.

It would cost a $$$gazillion more for humans to make them, and humans would be as slow as all fark. Pretty sure the factory owners and the ultimate paying customers are prepared to cop the 0.001% flaw rate for machines that just belt 'em out at a fraction of the cost.

A 0.001% flaw rate, I'm guessing, isn't something NASA is gonna wear, and they're prepared to spend the extra bucks.


Humans have the higher flaw rate.

But there's not enough demand for a big lens machine.

Now, an air knife that plucks out off colored cheetoes faster than you can blink....
 
2014-02-01 05:16:26 AM

doglover: I find it a bit odd no one's figured out how to build a better violin yet.


Better is subjective and you can get a huge debate going between violinists over what's better, a Stradivarius, Amati or Guarneri. Some consider Guarneris superior to everything, even though they've never had the attention Stradivarius violins have had. Or even Amatis for that matter. And if the price thing comes up, the most expensive violin ever is the Vieuxtemps Guarneri violin, which was being sold for $18 million, though if the buyer paid that much is unknown. As for people today building violins that sound as good, it can be done.
 
2014-02-01 05:26:31 AM

Weatherkiss: Paris1127: viscountalpha: And yes. This reeks of a pro job. I do have to wonder why they used a stun gun instead of flat out killing the guy.

Professional courtesy?

If whoever paid for this job is a real classical music lover, they wouldn't want Frank Almond dead. He's apparently quite good.

I'm also willing to bet it's less about "Honor Among Thieves" and more about "Hey, if we get caught doing this, murder is going to be a little bit more severe than robbery when you're on trial."


I'm sure there are lots of thieves who are cool with stealing a world treasure who find murder distasteful or don't have the stomach for it, especially since it clearly wasn't necessary.  Either way, I'm glad Almond is okay.

This is all made especially sad considering his relatively recent release of A Violin's Life, a Kickstarter-funded album that traces back the heritage of this specific Strad.
 
2014-02-01 05:26:39 AM
The good news is that the 'priceless' part comes from pretentious folk who don't actual care about music.  Sure, sure, everyone SAYS it sounds better, except when they don't know which is the priceless violin and which is the brand new nothing special one.  Then the truth comes out.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Player_preferences_among_new_and_old_vi ol ins
* the most-preferred violin was new;
* the least-preferred was by Stradivari;
* there was low correlation between an instrument's age and monetary value and its perceived quality;
* most players seemed unable to tell whether their most-preferred instrument was new or old.
 
2014-02-01 05:27:02 AM

doglover: Big Ramifications: doglover: Big Ramifications: doglover: WraithSama: As a violinist, and as someone who would dearly love to see a Strad played live by someone worthy of it (someday, Joshua Bell...), this theft is really upsetting to me.  There are so few Strads left, and most are either sitting in museums, or the biggest travesty of all, in private collectors' vaults never to be heard and enjoyed as they should be.

Whoever stun gunned Almond and took the violin clearly know what it is and what it's worth, or they were hired by someone who does.  Such a tragedy.

I find it a bit odd no one's figured out how to build a better violin yet.

We have more and better materials these days.
~

re: Lenses for the most important, biggest budget telescopes ie. the Hubble telescopes of today

A while back I read that the final "light grinding-back" and polishing of the big-assed lenses is done by humans!  Coz humans still make better lenses than any machine. That's still got me scratchin' me head.

Go team humans!

That's also false. Humans finish lenses better than any machine thus far. If we made lenses better, there wouldn't be mass produced glasses.
~

You clown. Maybe humans do make better glasses lenses as well.... but that's irrelevant, lens quality isn't the driver here.

It would cost a $$$gazillion more for humans to make them, and humans would be as slow as all fark. Pretty sure the factory owners and the ultimate paying customers are prepared to cop the 0.001% flaw rate for machines that just belt 'em out at a fraction of the cost.

A 0.001% flaw rate, I'm guessing, isn't something NASA is gonna wear, and they're prepared to spend the extra bucks.

Humans have the higher flaw rate.

But there's not enough demand for a big lens machine.

Now, an air knife that plucks out off colored cheetoes faster than you can blink....

~

Cool, that's not how I remember the story going.... but your version makes sense too. Cheers.
 
2014-02-01 05:28:44 AM
Unavailable for comment.

www.starwarped.net
 
2014-02-01 05:29:13 AM

WhyteRaven74: doglover: I find it a bit odd no one's figured out how to build a better violin yet.

Better is subjective and you can get a huge debate going between violinists over what's better, a Stradivarius, Amati or Guarneri. Some consider Guarneris superior to everything, even though they've never had the attention Stradivarius violins have had. Or even Amatis for that matter. And if the price thing comes up, the most expensive violin ever is the Vieuxtemps Guarneri violin, which was being sold for $18 million, though if the buyer paid that much is unknown. As for people today building violins that sound as good, it can be done.


Irridium fittings, finest ebony body, strings made of finest catgut, momster cables, a my little pony sticker.
 
2014-02-01 05:40:28 AM

Fark_Guy_Rob: The good news is that the 'priceless' part comes from pretentious folk who don't actual care about music.  Sure, sure, everyone SAYS it sounds better, except when they don't know which is the priceless violin and which is the brand new nothing special one.  Then the truth comes out.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Player_preferences_among_new_and_old_vi ol ins
* the most-preferred violin was new;
* the least-preferred was by Stradivari;
* there was low correlation between an instrument's age and monetary value and its perceived quality;
* most players seemed unable to tell whether their most-preferred instrument was new or old.


Pretentious.  That's a fun word, isn't it?  How about we not call other people pretentious, particularly when we try to be condescending by posting a link to a study's wikipedia page, which mentions the study's possible flaws, that has already been brought up and discussed in this thread's comments--on page one, mind you--which you clearly didn't read.
 
2014-02-01 05:57:15 AM

WraithSama: I'm sure there are lots of thieves who are cool with stealing a world treasure who find murder distasteful or don't have the stomach for it, especially since it clearly wasn't necessary. Either way, I'm glad Almond is okay.

This is all made especially sad considering his relatively recent release of A Violin's Life, a Kickstarter-funded album that traces back the heritage of this specific Strad.


Well, sure. I mean the idea of the job was to steal the violin. Murder would be unnecessary.

But if this guy really wanted to be an ultra-classy sophisticated criminal like in the movies he'd have killed the violinist because he didn't want anyone else to hear him play again, thus becoming the ultimate thief.

Like Johnny Depp's character in Once Upon a Time in Mexico murdering a chef because his food was too perfect and didn't want anyone else to taste it.
 
2014-02-01 07:57:35 AM

viscountalpha: And yes. This reeks of a pro job. I do have to wonder why they used a stun gun instead of flat out killing the guy.

Professional courtesy?


Because that would get you caught?
 
2014-02-01 08:01:15 AM
How about a conspiracy theory? Maybe the violinist was in financial straits and staged the robbery to cash in on the insurance.
 
2014-02-01 08:15:39 AM
Forget tests that compare what sounds "better" (especially if the older instruments had old strings vs new ones on the modern ones).  It's been accepted that Strads sound best.  So, how to make a violin sound like a Strad?

There was a documentary many years ago that followed a man who set out to do so.  While the wood was important, the varnish seemed to be key.  The varnish had a unique blend of minerals, even ground sapphire.  When the violin maker used similar wood and replicated the varnish, the instrument sounded like a Strad.

Sorry I can't find the documentary to link to it.
 
2014-02-01 08:32:43 AM
Can't find the Stradivarius?  It's in the Carousel Room.  Duh.
 
2014-02-01 08:48:50 AM

Poe: Eltardo: Why do they let people just walk around with these things?  Hundreds of years old and a multimillion dollar price tag and they just take it with them when they leave like it was a gym bag?

Indeed.  If I was in the posession of a musical instrument that has it's own wikipedia article, I would be transporting it with an armed escort.


I am somewhat surprised to learn that there is not a mandatory insurance provision on the instrument that required armed security transport to be paid by the next venue set to receive the player/instrument.
 
2014-02-01 09:06:50 AM

Earguy: Forget tests that compare what sounds "better" (especially if the older instruments had old strings vs new ones on the modern ones).  It's been accepted that Strads sound best.  So, how to make a violin sound like a Strad?


It's one of those bits of received wisdom that a Strad sounds better. There's been tests for decades that show that people can't identify a Strad, and comparison tests have been done where a modern Swiss violin outperformed a Strad.
 
2014-02-01 09:20:50 AM

farkeruk: Earguy: Forget tests that compare what sounds "better" (especially if the older instruments had old strings vs new ones on the modern ones).  It's been accepted that Strads sound best.  So, how to make a violin sound like a Strad?

It's one of those bits of received wisdom that a Strad sounds better. There's been tests for decades that show that people can't identify a Strad, and comparison tests have been done where a modern Swiss violin outperformed a Strad.


What criteria are used to determine this? Was the same player performing on both instruments?
 
2014-02-01 09:28:45 AM
My theory is that the owner has it heavily insured. He lends it to an artist he knows and respects, hence the relative lack of violence when he has it stolen. He then collects the insurance money, still has his violin to sell to a private collector, and makes a tidy profit.
 
2014-02-01 09:34:07 AM
I'm curious to know what he's playing on in the meantime.
 
2014-02-01 09:36:22 AM

deansnose: My theory is that the owner has it heavily insured. He lends it to an artist he knows and respects, hence the relative lack of violence when he has it stolen. He then collects the insurance money, still has his violin to sell to a private collector, and makes a tidy profit.


He would have to have some medical condition that will result in him no longer being able to play, to give up playing that instrument.  Musicians would rather play the finest instruments than have a quick fat checking account.  Hence why he is offering $100,000.
 
2014-02-01 09:46:29 AM

farkeruk: Earguy: Forget tests that compare what sounds "better" (especially if the older instruments had old strings vs new ones on the modern ones).  It's been accepted that Strads sound best.  So, how to make a violin sound like a Strad?

It's one of those bits of received wisdom that a Strad sounds better. There's been tests for decades that show that people can't identify a Strad, and comparison tests have been done where a modern Swiss violin outperformed a Strad.


Since I'm about to have breakfast, are coffee and eggs known to be good for you or bad for you this week?
 
2014-02-01 10:31:13 AM
cdn.theatlantic.com
 
2014-02-01 10:59:38 AM

Nogale: What criteria are used to determine this? Was the same player performing on both instruments?


Yes. And there's been other sorts of comparisons done and the Strad doesn't come up any better.

I'd like to ask: what's your evidence that Stradivarius violins are better?
 
2014-02-01 11:25:04 AM

viscountalpha: And yes. This reeks of a pro job. I do have to wonder why they used a stun gun instead of flat out killing the guy.

Professional courtesy?


I'm thinking that a violinist would probably not present too much of a threat physically speaking.  \

This is why,unless you have a team of pro bodyguards, you never advertise the fact that you are walking around with a  seven figure fortune in your possession.

I'd have gone for it had I been aware of this high-reward, low-risk windfall.   Absolutely!
 
2014-02-01 11:31:17 AM
Surprised it did not happen sooner.....

thirdcoastdaily.com
 
2014-02-01 11:42:15 AM

farkeruk: Nogale: What criteria are used to determine this? Was the same player performing on both instruments?

Yes. And there's been other sorts of comparisons done and the Strad doesn't come up any better.

I'd like to ask: what's your evidence that Stradivarius violins are better?


I have none and I've never said they were. But I was curious about what standards are applied to determining that one violin is better than another.
 
2014-02-01 12:23:21 PM
I am dissapoint with lack of reference to Head Office and Eddie Albert - Jude Rienhold pics.
 
2014-02-01 03:07:14 PM

default_user01: Unavailable for comment.

[www.starwarped.net image 850x504]


Came for this.  THANK YOU.
 
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