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(Gawker)   Had any fresh fruits and vegetables lately? How about some almonds or walnuts? California produces a huge percentage of this stuff, and the state just cut farm water supplies to ... zero   (gawker.com) divider line 49
    More: Scary, walnuts, vegetables lately, almonds, water supplies, fruits, farms  
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8416 clicks; posted to Main » on 01 Feb 2014 at 12:41 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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Archived thread
2014-02-01 12:44:44 AM  
8 votes:
Maybe growing most of the nation's food in a desert was not such a good idea.
2014-02-01 01:10:03 AM  
6 votes:

Monkeyfark Ridiculous: "Farmers pumped out the groundwater long ago, and massive state and federal water projects keep agriculture going in a place that has otherwise turned to arid and chemical-soaked fields of death."

I'm not 100% convinced that anyone should be sending their water to support agriculture in the arid chemical-soaked fields of death of farmers who long ago destroyed their own water supply.


Yeah, blame it on the farmers. It's all their fault that everyone wanted to eat food on the cheap, just like it's the miners in Appalachia's fault everyone wanted power on the cheap.

You might put some blame on the agribusinesses who run the farms, sparky. The FARMERS knew a few decades ago it was insanity to keep pouring water on the fields--but the agribusinesses needed those rich, creamy water subsidies, which made it more cost-effective to keep dumping water all over the place rather than switching over to less wasteful drip-irrigation systems.

Anyway, most of the extraneous water loss isn't due to agriculture, which is extremely necessary. It's due to the bullshiat big cities like the one I live in, with its nice green lawns, nice green golf courses and parks, and water-wasting fountains, air-chilling plants and leaky infrastructure that drips water all over the desert south of Bakersfield.

I wonder how much water would be saved if we banned lawns--and ONLY lawns--in So Cal. I bet it would be a lot.
2014-02-01 12:51:42 AM  
5 votes:
Ha ha.

I'm anxiously awaiting when we get our 50-gal/day mandatory water rationing. We did that during the last really bad drought in 1976ish, IIRC. That was fun. Not. No flush-ie toilet, bathing every other day, no watering lawns...good times. Cannot WAIT for the screaming from the HOAs, though! Watching golf courses get brown & crunchy in the searing So Cal sun...

Of course, this could have been avoided decades ago, but why have thought for the morrow.

Oh, and in re this:

CipollinaFan: Maybe growing most of the nation's food in a desert was not such a good idea.


Most of the FOOD is not grown in a desert. Most of the LAWNS, however, are. Pro tip: You're not really supposed to have this many people south of the San Gabriel Mountains, but why plan for that either...
2014-02-01 12:50:21 AM  
5 votes:
Can we please ban lawns nationwide already?
2014-02-01 12:27:05 AM  
5 votes:
Maybe the fact that there's no water TO deliver might be a factor

/reservoirs ain't lookin' too good around here
//and damn little snow up top
///this is gonna suck hard come Summer
2014-02-01 01:49:29 AM  
4 votes:

MaudlinMutantMollusk: Maybe the fact that there's no water TO deliver might be a factor

/reservoirs ain't lookin' too good around here
//and damn little snow up top
///this is gonna suck hard come Summer


You live in California; be honest, it sucks in Spring, Fall, and Winter too.

Gyrfalcon:
I wonder how much water would be saved if we banned lawns--and ONLY lawns--in So Cal. I bet it would be a lot.

The answer: more than enough. It's farking stupid that people have lawns in deserts. And golf courses, being giant lawns, are the worst. They have both of them out here in Arizona too, which is extra stupid.

I've got a better solution though, that won't end up with  SWAT teams being used for code enforcement required. Simply stop subsidizing the cost of water. You see, I don't conserve water at all. I leave the sink running while I brush my teeth, I run the dishwasher as many times I need to, I take long showers. And the water usage part of my bill every month is $2. Literally $2. I could use ten times as much water as I do every month and the bill would still be negligible. There's absolutely no incentive to save water.

Now, I live in a freakin desert. There's no way the water I use actually costs $2. Somewhere along the line some asshat in the government decided to encourage growth or "help" the poor or more likely just wanted to play golf, and now water usage isn't remotely related to water costs. There's no reason not to use as much as you want, and all us jerks can have lawns and long showers and golf courses right up until nothing comes out of the tap.

So get rid of that crap. Let water cost what it actually costs, and you don't have to make any rules about water usage. Suddenly lawns are too expensive, people shut off the water the way they shut off lights, and golf courses go out of business. Best of all, if the cost of water goes up, the usage goes down and the water lasts longer. It's freakin' amazing what letting people see the actual cost of their stuff will do. And, as an extra bonus, you don't have to make any new rules to enforce. No SWAT raids for water violations, no spying on you to see your usage, no drones checking your swimming pool, none of that. Just plain simply economics to fix the problem. That's what we need in Arizona, and that's what you need in California.
2014-02-01 12:26:57 AM  
4 votes:
Don't worry, things can't be that bad if they're still allowing the oil companies to use what little fresh water we have to flush oil out of the ground.
2014-02-01 01:08:41 AM  
3 votes:

Nexzus: As a citizen of the country north of the USA, incidentally containing 20% of the world's fresh water and .5% of the world's population: every time I hear about another water shortage in our neighbours to the south, I get a tiny bit more nervous.

This shiat only seems to be getting worse. People will biatch and moan and make-do over super-expensive or no oil. They may get shooty if you do the same with water.


I find it kinda funny (funny "duh" not funny "ha-ha") when people start mumbling about getting water from the Great Lakes.

Ever look at the Great Lakes watershed?  Most of it is in Canada.  That's Canadian water.
2014-02-01 12:59:12 AM  
3 votes:
As a citizen of the country north of the USA, incidentally containing 20% of the world's fresh water and .5% of the world's population: every time I hear about another water shortage in our neighbours to the south, I get a tiny bit more nervous.

This shiat only seems to be getting worse. People will biatch and moan and make-do over super-expensive or no oil. They may get shooty if you do the same with water.
2014-02-01 12:54:48 AM  
3 votes:
"Farmers pumped out the groundwater long ago, and massive state and federal water projects keep agriculture going in a place that has otherwise turned to arid and chemical-soaked fields of death."

I'm not 100% convinced that anyone should be sending their water to support agriculture in the arid chemical-soaked fields of death of farmers who long ago destroyed their own water supply.
2014-02-01 12:45:50 AM  
3 votes:
Well what do you expect when you put like a brazillian people IN A FARKING DESERT.
2014-02-01 01:30:32 AM  
2 votes:

CipollinaFan: Maybe growing most of the nation's food in a desert was not such a good idea.


You understand that it wasn't really a desert until they dammed the rivers and diverted the water to LA, right?
2014-02-01 01:24:03 AM  
2 votes:
FTFA where much of the nation's food is grown

Iowa, Nebraska, and Minnesota would like a word with you.
2014-02-01 01:19:59 AM  
2 votes:
What's interesting is that Southern California, having been cut off the North and Central Valley regions (where most of the snowfall is) during the last big drought in the 70's, has been hoarding water in good times and stashing it underground storage and reservoirs.  We've also managed to cut our water use in many areas while growing population at the same time.

As such, while Brown declares a state of emergency, San Diego and other SoCal municipalities have no plans for rationing nor forced conservation at the moment.  It's pretty much NorCal and the Central Valley that are farked for a change.
2014-02-01 01:15:36 AM  
2 votes:

evaned: "Water is the most renewable resource there is!"


An unfortunately true statement.  The problem is that that doesn't mean it's renewable enough.
2014-02-01 01:09:57 AM  
2 votes:

JonBuck: They can't build this desalination plant fast enough. Won't be running for a couple years.


IT'S ABOUT GODDAMNED TIME

/FFS, I've been saying for YEARS this was what we needed to do
//and when we had a working nuke powerplant on the coast, we could have built one next door and had the power required right there
///But NOOOoooooo...
2014-02-01 01:03:14 AM  
2 votes:
There are no sustainability problems.  Keep consuming.
2014-02-01 01:00:35 AM  
2 votes:
Yeah, shiat's getting real here. This is Folsom Lake, which is a major part of the water supply for the Sacramento area. I took this pic a couple weekends ago.

scontent-a-lax.xx.fbcdn.net
2014-02-01 12:44:08 AM  
2 votes:
West Virginia is ready to send some water your way!

You did order licorice smelling poison, right?
2014-02-01 11:01:36 PM  
1 votes:
putting farms in deserts was never very smart
2014-02-01 11:38:02 AM  
1 votes:

Louisiana_Sitar_Club: Gyrfalcon: I wonder how much water would be saved if we banned lawns--and ONLY lawns--in So Cal. I bet it would be a lot.

I bet it wouldn't.  If only there were some way to find out.  Oh yeah, the Googles.

UCLA Institute of Environment and Sustainability:


[www.environment.ucla.edu image 500x335]

Urban residential exterior (multi family and single family combined): 6%
Large Landscape 1%
Total: 7% (only a portion of which goes to grass.)

Yeah!  Get rid of those lawns!!!!!  I'm waaaaahhhrrrrrggarrbbllllle!


You have some sort of agenda going on here?  Gyrfalcon specifically mentions lawns in SoCal, so you go ahead and post a graph of the entire state of California when  right below the same graph you posted from the same link is a graph of lawns in SoCal.

Here... let me re-Google that for you:

www.environment.ucla.edu

Yeah!  Cherry-pick charted information to create a misleading presentation!!!!!  I'm waaaaahhhrrrrrggarrbbllllle!
2014-02-01 03:09:36 AM  
1 votes:

Pincy: Mark Ratner: Too bad it is really expensive to desalinate the ocean water.

No kidding.  Think of all the salt we'd have.


Actually lowered salinity is part of what the problem is. Mind you this is all off the top of my head from taking a meteorology class eight years ago, but basically the more that polar ice caps and glaciers melt, the lower the salinity of the oceans becomes. There's a current that runs through most of the globe that is dependent on salinity, because salt water doesn't freeze until it's about 28 degrees or less. This means it sinks, which contributes to the movement of the current.

I realize you'd have to build scores of plants to affect salinity on a level that would raise that level again, but... it certainly wouldn't hurt.
2014-02-01 02:59:57 AM  
1 votes:

Smeggy Smurf: Ah yes, control of the food supply just in time to manufacture a crisis.  Well played Fartbongo


You know, every time I come back here from reddit and see retarded comments like this I wish there was a farking downvote button on Fark too.
2014-02-01 02:58:06 AM  
1 votes:

Gyrfalcon: Watching golf courses get brown & crunchy in the searing So Cal sun...


If So Cal is like central Arizona, those golf courses are legally required to utilize gray water from waste-water treatment facilities and not potable water.  Same with large parks and greenbelts in neighborhoods.


/don't drink water from the purple pipes
2014-02-01 02:14:15 AM  
1 votes:

That Guy Jeff: MaudlinMutantMollusk: Maybe the fact that there's no water TO deliver might be a factor

/reservoirs ain't lookin' too good around here
//and damn little snow up top
///this is gonna suck hard come Summer

You live in California; be honest, it sucks in Spring, Fall, and Winter too.


Ahahahahaha... no

/if you're already here, leave
//if you're not here, don't come here: it sucks just as badly as you believe it does
2014-02-01 01:48:01 AM  
1 votes:

MaudlinMutantMollusk: make me some tea: RayD8: WOW! I think you may be in for a lean time. You will have to shower like the French.(weekly)

I'm from Las Vegas, so I'm no stranger to water issues, but this is entirely different because Sac area isn't accustomed to rationing. They're asking residential customers to cut their water use as much as possible. Shut off water to lawns, take 5min showers, etc. I'm pretty sure it's going to be mandatory soon. This summer is gonna be a biatch unless the pattern changes.

Oh, rationing isn't new to Sac by any means

/have we reached "brick in the toilet and only flush solids" stage yet?


We still get plenty of fog, it might be time to invest in moisture collection systems.
2014-02-01 01:41:20 AM  
1 votes:

bromah: hey guys, everyone should know this.  So my buddy was looking for an intern position for his Engineering degree..

Well at one of his interviews (with a very big defense contractor) it was dropped that they had (as he expressed interest in working on this project) completed a successful desal technique that is so low energy as to end the water crisis.

They're probably going to sit on this for the next decade or two while we all suffer till peak water hits and they can make their killing.


I'm not saying your story sounds like bullshiat, but you're story sounds like bullshiat
2014-02-01 01:35:47 AM  
1 votes:

super_grass: Better yet, find a way for the cooling towers to use sea water and collect fresh water from the cooling stacks too.


No can do. Sea water gets mighty corrosive when enough of the water evaporates, and you don't want cooling pipes to suddenly start falling apart at a nuke plant. You think the bottom rusting out of some tanks in West Virginia was bad....

/and for those blaming fracking, you can't use sea water for that either
//not unless you want to turn all the groundwater to saltwater, at least according to the environmentalists
///not worth the risk, when fracking is only using 0.3% of the total fresh water consumed, anyway
2014-02-01 01:32:10 AM  
1 votes:
hey guys, everyone should know this.  So my buddy was looking for an intern position for his Engineering degree..

Well at one of his interviews (with a very big defense contractor) it was dropped that they had (as he expressed interest in working on this project) completed a successful desal technique that is so low energy as to end the water crisis.

They're probably going to sit on this for the next decade or two while we all suffer till peak water hits and they can make their killing.
2014-02-01 01:31:48 AM  
1 votes:

RayD8: Somewhat off topic but still to do with fruit.

I had a guy here for the last 3 days in Singapore who is from Aberdeen.



I thought you were headed in another direction with this
2014-02-01 01:31:31 AM  
1 votes:

Mitch Taylor's Bro: Don't worry, things can't be that bad if they're still allowing the oil companies to use what little fresh water we have to flush oil out of the ground.


this.
2014-02-01 01:26:22 AM  
1 votes:

Gyrfalcon: Monkeyfark Ridiculous: "Farmers pumped out the groundwater long ago, and massive state and federal water projects keep agriculture going in a place that has otherwise turned to arid and chemical-soaked fields of death."

I'm not 100% convinced that anyone should be sending their water to support agriculture in the arid chemical-soaked fields of death of farmers who long ago destroyed their own water supply.

Yeah, blame it on the farmers. It's all their fault that everyone wanted to eat food on the cheap, just like it's the miners in Appalachia's fault everyone wanted power on the cheap.

You might put some blame on the agribusinesses who run the farms, sparky. The FARMERS knew a few decades ago it was insanity to keep pouring water on the fields--but the agribusinesses needed those rich, creamy water subsidies, which made it more cost-effective to keep dumping water all over the place rather than switching over to less wasteful drip-irrigation systems.

Anyway, most of the extraneous water loss isn't due to agriculture, which is extremely necessary. It's due to the bullshiat big cities like the one I live in, with its nice green lawns, nice green golf courses and parks, and water-wasting fountains, air-chilling plants and leaky infrastructure that drips water all over the desert south of Bakersfield.

I wonder how much water would be saved if we banned lawns--and ONLY lawns--in So Cal. I bet it would be a lot.


I really don't care whether you call them "farmers" or "agribusinesses."

And I'm all in favour of reducing the kind of waste you mention - for instance I agree that there are a lot of lawns in a lot of places they shouldn't be and they are managed improperly - but watering lawns is a drop in the bucket next to agricultural and other commercial water use.
2014-02-01 01:24:29 AM  
1 votes:

RayD8: make me some tea: Yeah, shiat's getting real here. This is Folsom Lake, which is a major part of the water supply for the Sacramento area. I took this pic a couple weekends ago.

[scontent-a-lax.xx.fbcdn.net image 850x637]

Looks more like a small pond than a lake. That looks pretty farking bad.


The normal water level is up by that line of green. It's at least 100' down, maybe more. I had to walk about a mile from the parking lot "shore" over dry land to get to the water's edge. It's only 20% full now and dropping. They cut the flow to the American River a few weeks ago to mitigate the loss of water. We got a little bit of rain the last couple of days but it's not going to help much.

Here's another view looking the other direction:

fbcdn-sphotos-d-a.akamaihd.net
2014-02-01 01:18:14 AM  
1 votes:
Well can't we just give them Browndo?
snstoman.files.wordpress.com

Gyrfalcon: Anyway, most of the extraneous water loss isn't due to agriculture, which is extremely necessary. It's due to the bullshiat big cities like the one I live in, with its nice green lawns, nice green golf courses and parks, and water-wasting fountains, air-chilling plants and leaky infrastructure that drips water all over the desert south of Bakersfield.

I wonder how much water would be saved if we banned lawns--and ONLY lawns--in So Cal. I bet it would be a lot.


True, I thought Albuquerque and some of those type places were prettier with the desert plantings than LA
2014-02-01 01:17:35 AM  
1 votes:
Its almost like scientists havent been warning about this for the last 20 years.
2014-02-01 01:17:33 AM  
1 votes:
white - no drought
yellow - abnormally dry
peach - moderate drought
orange - severe drought
red - extreme drought
maroon - exceptional drought
droughtmonitor.unl.edu
2014-02-01 01:16:41 AM  
1 votes:
All the other farmers said I was daft to sow my crops in the desert, but I sowed them anyway just to show them!.  They dried up.  So I sowed a second crop, they dried up too.  So I sowed a third crop, they burned down, fell over and then dried up.  But the fourth one took.
2014-02-01 01:13:53 AM  
1 votes:
Also FTA:

fracking in california is done differently than elsewhere (vertically, not horizontally), so that each well will use a fraction of what it takes to fill an olympic-sized swimming pool or what a single golf course uses, every day

fark fracking - any amount of poisoned water is unacceptable - but california's water wasting problem isn't fracking, it's golf courses and green lawns and swimming pools

let's empty the pools, let the grass go brown, and water those tomatoes!


Gawker status:

Not told [ ]
Told [x]
2014-02-01 01:12:48 AM  
1 votes:

ikanreed: There are no sustainability problems.  Keep consuming.


Don't forget: "Water is the most renewable resource there is!"
2014-02-01 01:10:57 AM  
1 votes:

macross87: Forget it, Jake. It's Chinatown.


Bad for glass.
2014-02-01 01:05:54 AM  
1 votes:

make me some tea: Yeah, shiat's getting real here. This is Folsom Lake, which is a major part of the water supply for the Sacramento area. I took this pic a couple weekends ago.

[scontent-a-lax.xx.fbcdn.net image 850x637]


Looks more like a small pond than a lake. That looks pretty farking bad.
2014-02-01 01:03:06 AM  
1 votes:

Gyrfalcon: Ha ha.

I'm anxiously awaiting when we get our 50-gal/day mandatory water rationing. We did that during the last really bad drought in 1976ish, IIRC. That was fun. Not. No flush-ie toilet, bathing every other day, no watering lawns...good times. Cannot WAIT for the screaming from the HOAs, though! Watching golf courses get brown & crunchy in the searing So Cal sun...

Of course, this could have been avoided decades ago, but why have thought for the morrow.

Oh, and in re this: CipollinaFan: Maybe growing most of the nation's food in a desert was not such a good idea.

Most of the FOOD is not grown in a desert. Most of the LAWNS, however, are. Pro tip: You're not really supposed to have this many people south of the San Gabriel Mountains, but why plan for that either...


Most of the pools and golf courses are in the f*cking desert, too

/we'll send the Delta south when the pools are drained and the golf courses are xeriscaped
2014-02-01 12:59:24 AM  
1 votes:
img.fark.net
2014-02-01 12:56:12 AM  
1 votes:
Bite the pillow, I'm going in dry.
2014-02-01 12:52:29 AM  
1 votes:
fark almonds and walnuts, avocados are what matters.
gja
2014-02-01 12:51:13 AM  
1 votes:
This summer, coming to a California town near you...

"She ran calling Wiiiiiiiiiildfire, she ran calling Wiiiiiiiildfire, she ran calling wiiiiiii-iiiiii-iiiildfiiiiii-iiiiirtrrrrrre"
2014-02-01 12:50:05 AM  
1 votes:
Nope, no gorebull warming here.
2014-02-01 12:47:51 AM  
1 votes:
ITT people who don't understand that Northern California's climate is very different from Southern California's.

/Whatever, it'll just fall into the ocean anyway
2014-01-31 10:01:12 PM  
1 votes:
i1182.photobucket.com
 
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