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(Gawker)   Had any fresh fruits and vegetables lately? How about some almonds or walnuts? California produces a huge percentage of this stuff, and the state just cut farm water supplies to ... zero   (gawker.com) divider line 222
    More: Scary, walnuts, vegetables lately, almonds, water supplies, fruits, farms  
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8405 clicks; posted to Main » on 01 Feb 2014 at 12:41 AM (32 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



222 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-01-31 10:01:12 PM
i1182.photobucket.com
 
2014-01-31 11:59:23 PM
Motherfrackers!
 
2014-02-01 12:03:07 AM
Wait until they find out about Lake Meade.

Maybe they should move to where the food is.
 
2014-02-01 12:26:57 AM
Don't worry, things can't be that bad if they're still allowing the oil companies to use what little fresh water we have to flush oil out of the ground.
 
2014-02-01 12:27:05 AM
Maybe the fact that there's no water TO deliver might be a factor

/reservoirs ain't lookin' too good around here
//and damn little snow up top
///this is gonna suck hard come Summer
 
2014-02-01 12:44:08 AM
West Virginia is ready to send some water your way!

You did order licorice smelling poison, right?
 
2014-02-01 12:44:44 AM
Maybe growing most of the nation's food in a desert was not such a good idea.
 
2014-02-01 12:45:50 AM
Well what do you expect when you put like a brazillian people IN A FARKING DESERT.
 
2014-02-01 12:47:51 AM
ITT people who don't understand that Northern California's climate is very different from Southern California's.

/Whatever, it'll just fall into the ocean anyway
 
2014-02-01 12:48:21 AM

Oldiron_79: Well what do you expect when you put like a brazillian people IN A FARKING DESERT.


Mad Max: Beyond Thunderdome

/it's what I expect to happen with society when you put that many people in a farking desert!
 
2014-02-01 12:50:05 AM
Nope, no gorebull warming here.
 
2014-02-01 12:50:21 AM
Can we please ban lawns nationwide already?
 
gja [TotalFark]
2014-02-01 12:51:13 AM
This summer, coming to a California town near you...

"She ran calling Wiiiiiiiiiildfire, she ran calling Wiiiiiiiildfire, she ran calling wiiiiiii-iiiiii-iiiildfiiiiii-iiiiirtrrrrrre"
 
2014-02-01 12:51:42 AM
Ha ha.

I'm anxiously awaiting when we get our 50-gal/day mandatory water rationing. We did that during the last really bad drought in 1976ish, IIRC. That was fun. Not. No flush-ie toilet, bathing every other day, no watering lawns...good times. Cannot WAIT for the screaming from the HOAs, though! Watching golf courses get brown & crunchy in the searing So Cal sun...

Of course, this could have been avoided decades ago, but why have thought for the morrow.

Oh, and in re this:

CipollinaFan: Maybe growing most of the nation's food in a desert was not such a good idea.


Most of the FOOD is not grown in a desert. Most of the LAWNS, however, are. Pro tip: You're not really supposed to have this many people south of the San Gabriel Mountains, but why plan for that either...
 
2014-02-01 12:52:29 AM
fark almonds and walnuts, avocados are what matters.
 
2014-02-01 12:54:48 AM
"Farmers pumped out the groundwater long ago, and massive state and federal water projects keep agriculture going in a place that has otherwise turned to arid and chemical-soaked fields of death."

I'm not 100% convinced that anyone should be sending their water to support agriculture in the arid chemical-soaked fields of death of farmers who long ago destroyed their own water supply.
 
2014-02-01 12:56:12 AM
Bite the pillow, I'm going in dry.
 
2014-02-01 12:56:25 AM
Too bad it is really expensive to desalinate the ocean water.
 
2014-02-01 12:56:54 AM

ZoSo_the_Crowe: Can we please ban lawns nationwide already?


Hahhahaha no.

/great lakes states need something to be proud of.
 
2014-02-01 12:59:12 AM
As a citizen of the country north of the USA, incidentally containing 20% of the world's fresh water and .5% of the world's population: every time I hear about another water shortage in our neighbours to the south, I get a tiny bit more nervous.

This shiat only seems to be getting worse. People will biatch and moan and make-do over super-expensive or no oil. They may get shooty if you do the same with water.
 
2014-02-01 12:59:24 AM
img.fark.net
 
2014-02-01 01:00:35 AM
Yeah, shiat's getting real here. This is Folsom Lake, which is a major part of the water supply for the Sacramento area. I took this pic a couple weekends ago.

scontent-a-lax.xx.fbcdn.net
 
2014-02-01 01:02:40 AM

HotWingAgenda: Bite the pillow, I'm going in dry.


and dusty.
 
2014-02-01 01:03:06 AM

Gyrfalcon: Ha ha.

I'm anxiously awaiting when we get our 50-gal/day mandatory water rationing. We did that during the last really bad drought in 1976ish, IIRC. That was fun. Not. No flush-ie toilet, bathing every other day, no watering lawns...good times. Cannot WAIT for the screaming from the HOAs, though! Watching golf courses get brown & crunchy in the searing So Cal sun...

Of course, this could have been avoided decades ago, but why have thought for the morrow.

Oh, and in re this: CipollinaFan: Maybe growing most of the nation's food in a desert was not such a good idea.

Most of the FOOD is not grown in a desert. Most of the LAWNS, however, are. Pro tip: You're not really supposed to have this many people south of the San Gabriel Mountains, but why plan for that either...


Most of the pools and golf courses are in the f*cking desert, too

/we'll send the Delta south when the pools are drained and the golf courses are xeriscaped
 
2014-02-01 01:03:14 AM
There are no sustainability problems.  Keep consuming.
 
2014-02-01 01:04:02 AM
Forget it, Jake. It's Chinatown.
 
2014-02-01 01:04:30 AM

make me some tea: Yeah, shiat's getting real here. This is Folsom Lake, which is a major part of the water supply for the Sacramento area. I took this pic a couple weekends ago.

[scontent-a-lax.xx.fbcdn.net image 850x637]


I drove up Salmon Falls Road Tuesday

/it's even lower now
//what lake?
///bet they find that plane now
 
2014-02-01 01:05:52 AM
They can't build this desalination plant fast enough. Won't be running for a couple years.
 
2014-02-01 01:05:54 AM

make me some tea: Yeah, shiat's getting real here. This is Folsom Lake, which is a major part of the water supply for the Sacramento area. I took this pic a couple weekends ago.

[scontent-a-lax.xx.fbcdn.net image 850x637]


Looks more like a small pond than a lake. That looks pretty farking bad.
 
2014-02-01 01:08:33 AM

JonBuck: They can't build this desalination plant fast enough. Won't be running for a couple years.


It's the perfect solution to rising ocean levels.
 
2014-02-01 01:08:41 AM

Nexzus: As a citizen of the country north of the USA, incidentally containing 20% of the world's fresh water and .5% of the world's population: every time I hear about another water shortage in our neighbours to the south, I get a tiny bit more nervous.

This shiat only seems to be getting worse. People will biatch and moan and make-do over super-expensive or no oil. They may get shooty if you do the same with water.


I find it kinda funny (funny "duh" not funny "ha-ha") when people start mumbling about getting water from the Great Lakes.

Ever look at the Great Lakes watershed?  Most of it is in Canada.  That's Canadian water.
 
2014-02-01 01:09:03 AM
TFA: "Agriculture uses most of the state's fresh water supply, around 85 percent-the remainder is split between homes and business."

Fark: "Those damn lawns!" *shakes fist*
 
2014-02-01 01:09:43 AM
I recall California shutting blocking off large amounts of irrigation water before too but it was over a tiny smelt. Protecting endangered species means cutting off resources to people.

Sucks but them's the rules.
 
2014-02-01 01:09:57 AM

JonBuck: They can't build this desalination plant fast enough. Won't be running for a couple years.


IT'S ABOUT GODDAMNED TIME

/FFS, I've been saying for YEARS this was what we needed to do
//and when we had a working nuke powerplant on the coast, we could have built one next door and had the power required right there
///But NOOOoooooo...
 
2014-02-01 01:10:03 AM

Monkeyfark Ridiculous: "Farmers pumped out the groundwater long ago, and massive state and federal water projects keep agriculture going in a place that has otherwise turned to arid and chemical-soaked fields of death."

I'm not 100% convinced that anyone should be sending their water to support agriculture in the arid chemical-soaked fields of death of farmers who long ago destroyed their own water supply.


Yeah, blame it on the farmers. It's all their fault that everyone wanted to eat food on the cheap, just like it's the miners in Appalachia's fault everyone wanted power on the cheap.

You might put some blame on the agribusinesses who run the farms, sparky. The FARMERS knew a few decades ago it was insanity to keep pouring water on the fields--but the agribusinesses needed those rich, creamy water subsidies, which made it more cost-effective to keep dumping water all over the place rather than switching over to less wasteful drip-irrigation systems.

Anyway, most of the extraneous water loss isn't due to agriculture, which is extremely necessary. It's due to the bullshiat big cities like the one I live in, with its nice green lawns, nice green golf courses and parks, and water-wasting fountains, air-chilling plants and leaky infrastructure that drips water all over the desert south of Bakersfield.

I wonder how much water would be saved if we banned lawns--and ONLY lawns--in So Cal. I bet it would be a lot.
 
2014-02-01 01:10:12 AM
It's raining men.  Hallelujah oh it's not raining shiat.  I take that back.
 
2014-02-01 01:10:57 AM

macross87: Forget it, Jake. It's Chinatown.


Bad for glass.
 
2014-02-01 01:12:48 AM

ikanreed: There are no sustainability problems.  Keep consuming.


Don't forget: "Water is the most renewable resource there is!"
 
2014-02-01 01:13:11 AM
looks like the East coast can start importing food from europe right away
 
2014-02-01 01:13:53 AM
Also FTA:

fracking in california is done differently than elsewhere (vertically, not horizontally), so that each well will use a fraction of what it takes to fill an olympic-sized swimming pool or what a single golf course uses, every day

fark fracking - any amount of poisoned water is unacceptable - but california's water wasting problem isn't fracking, it's golf courses and green lawns and swimming pools

let's empty the pools, let the grass go brown, and water those tomatoes!


Gawker status:

Not told [ ]
Told [x]
 
2014-02-01 01:13:56 AM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: JonBuck: They can't build this desalination plant fast enough. Won't be running for a couple years.

IT'S ABOUT GODDAMNED TIME

/FFS, I've been saying for YEARS this was what we needed to do
//and when we had a working nuke powerplant on the coast, we could have built one next door and had the power required right there
///But NOOOoooooo...


Nuclear power is bad. It might explode.
 
2014-02-01 01:15:24 AM

Monkeyfark Ridiculous: TFA: "Agriculture uses most of the state's fresh water supply, around 85 percent-the remainder is split between homes and business."

Fark: "Those damn lawns!" *shakes fist*


And the remaining split is heavily tilted towards industrial usage versus homes and stores/office buildings.
 
2014-02-01 01:15:36 AM

evaned: "Water is the most renewable resource there is!"


An unfortunately true statement.  The problem is that that doesn't mean it's renewable enough.
 
2014-02-01 01:16:41 AM
All the other farmers said I was daft to sow my crops in the desert, but I sowed them anyway just to show them!.  They dried up.  So I sowed a second crop, they dried up too.  So I sowed a third crop, they burned down, fell over and then dried up.  But the fourth one took.
 
2014-02-01 01:16:50 AM

JonBuck: They can't build this desalination plant fast enough. Won't be running for a couple years.


If they brought in some foreign workers it would be ready by Christmas.
 
2014-02-01 01:17:33 AM
white - no drought
yellow - abnormally dry
peach - moderate drought
orange - severe drought
red - extreme drought
maroon - exceptional drought
droughtmonitor.unl.edu
 
2014-02-01 01:17:35 AM
Its almost like scientists havent been warning about this for the last 20 years.
 
2014-02-01 01:18:14 AM
Well can't we just give them Browndo?
snstoman.files.wordpress.com

Gyrfalcon: Anyway, most of the extraneous water loss isn't due to agriculture, which is extremely necessary. It's due to the bullshiat big cities like the one I live in, with its nice green lawns, nice green golf courses and parks, and water-wasting fountains, air-chilling plants and leaky infrastructure that drips water all over the desert south of Bakersfield.

I wonder how much water would be saved if we banned lawns--and ONLY lawns--in So Cal. I bet it would be a lot.


True, I thought Albuquerque and some of those type places were prettier with the desert plantings than LA
 
2014-02-01 01:18:38 AM
Ah yes, control of the food supply just in time to manufacture a crisis.  Well played Fartbongo
 
2014-02-01 01:19:02 AM

Gyrfalcon: MaudlinMutantMollusk: JonBuck: They can't build this desalination plant fast enough. Won't be running for a couple years.

IT'S ABOUT GODDAMNED TIME

/FFS, I've been saying for YEARS this was what we needed to do
//and when we had a working nuke powerplant on the coast, we could have built one next door and had the power required right there
///But NOOOoooooo...

Nuclear power is bad. It might explode.


Well, that's kinda remote

/but they can go all glowy, gamma ray, neutron sh*t crazy and do nasty things to lizards and various already weird sea critters
//I seen that on tv
 
2014-02-01 01:19:59 AM
What's interesting is that Southern California, having been cut off the North and Central Valley regions (where most of the snowfall is) during the last big drought in the 70's, has been hoarding water in good times and stashing it underground storage and reservoirs.  We've also managed to cut our water use in many areas while growing population at the same time.

As such, while Brown declares a state of emergency, San Diego and other SoCal municipalities have no plans for rationing nor forced conservation at the moment.  It's pretty much NorCal and the Central Valley that are farked for a change.
 
2014-02-01 01:20:27 AM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: JonBuck: They can't build this desalination plant fast enough. Won't be running for a couple years.

IT'S ABOUT GODDAMNED TIME

/FFS, I've been saying for YEARS this was what we needed to do
//and when we had a working nuke powerplant on the coast, we could have built one next door and had the power required right there
///But NOOOoooooo...


Better yet, find a way for the cooling towers to use sea water and collect fresh water from the cooling stacks too.
 
2014-02-01 01:22:11 AM

Malky: Its almost like scientists havent been warning about this for the last 20 years.


Scientists are corrupted by that sweet, sweet grant money.  Also, Al Gore.
 
2014-02-01 01:23:03 AM

jaerik: What's interesting is that Southern California, having been cut off the North and Central Valley regions (where most of the snowfall is) during the last big drought in the 70's, has been hoarding water in good times and stashing it underground storage and reservoirs.  We've also managed to cut our water use in many areas while growing population at the same time.

As such, while Brown declares a state of emergency, San Diego and other SoCal municipalities have no plans for rationing nor forced conservation at the moment.  It's pretty much NorCal and the Central Valley that are farked for a change.


You have a point there: the south did make an effort to increase storage that we didn't up here, and that needs to change

/Jerry's plan for the underground Peripheral Canal is likely to be a harder sell now, too
 
2014-02-01 01:23:22 AM
Oh come on. Let's just drain Shasta and call it good, k?

/jay kay!
//Palm Springs golf courses are still good, yeah?
 
2014-02-01 01:24:03 AM
FTFA where much of the nation's food is grown

Iowa, Nebraska, and Minnesota would like a word with you.
 
2014-02-01 01:24:29 AM

RayD8: make me some tea: Yeah, shiat's getting real here. This is Folsom Lake, which is a major part of the water supply for the Sacramento area. I took this pic a couple weekends ago.

[scontent-a-lax.xx.fbcdn.net image 850x637]

Looks more like a small pond than a lake. That looks pretty farking bad.


The normal water level is up by that line of green. It's at least 100' down, maybe more. I had to walk about a mile from the parking lot "shore" over dry land to get to the water's edge. It's only 20% full now and dropping. They cut the flow to the American River a few weeks ago to mitigate the loss of water. We got a little bit of rain the last couple of days but it's not going to help much.

Here's another view looking the other direction:

fbcdn-sphotos-d-a.akamaihd.net
 
2014-02-01 01:26:22 AM

Gyrfalcon: Monkeyfark Ridiculous: "Farmers pumped out the groundwater long ago, and massive state and federal water projects keep agriculture going in a place that has otherwise turned to arid and chemical-soaked fields of death."

I'm not 100% convinced that anyone should be sending their water to support agriculture in the arid chemical-soaked fields of death of farmers who long ago destroyed their own water supply.

Yeah, blame it on the farmers. It's all their fault that everyone wanted to eat food on the cheap, just like it's the miners in Appalachia's fault everyone wanted power on the cheap.

You might put some blame on the agribusinesses who run the farms, sparky. The FARMERS knew a few decades ago it was insanity to keep pouring water on the fields--but the agribusinesses needed those rich, creamy water subsidies, which made it more cost-effective to keep dumping water all over the place rather than switching over to less wasteful drip-irrigation systems.

Anyway, most of the extraneous water loss isn't due to agriculture, which is extremely necessary. It's due to the bullshiat big cities like the one I live in, with its nice green lawns, nice green golf courses and parks, and water-wasting fountains, air-chilling plants and leaky infrastructure that drips water all over the desert south of Bakersfield.

I wonder how much water would be saved if we banned lawns--and ONLY lawns--in So Cal. I bet it would be a lot.


I really don't care whether you call them "farmers" or "agribusinesses."

And I'm all in favour of reducing the kind of waste you mention - for instance I agree that there are a lot of lawns in a lot of places they shouldn't be and they are managed improperly - but watering lawns is a drop in the bucket next to agricultural and other commercial water use.
 
2014-02-01 01:26:42 AM

make me some tea: RayD8: make me some tea: Yeah, shiat's getting real here. This is Folsom Lake, which is a major part of the water supply for the Sacramento area. I took this pic a couple weekends ago.

[scontent-a-lax.xx.fbcdn.net image 850x637]

Looks more like a small pond than a lake. That looks pretty farking bad.

The normal water level is up by that line of green. It's at least 100' down, maybe more. I had to walk about a mile from the parking lot "shore" over dry land to get to the water's edge. It's only 20% full now and dropping. They cut the flow to the American River a few weeks ago to mitigate the loss of water. We got a little bit of rain the last couple of days but it's not going to help much.

Here's another view looking the other direction:

[fbcdn-sphotos-d-a.akamaihd.net image 720x540]


Granite Bay view?
 
2014-02-01 01:27:58 AM
Somewhat off topic but still to do with fruit.

I had a guy here for the last 3 days in Singapore who is from Aberdeen.
Every time we went for lunch all he would eat was copious amounts of fruit.
Stuffing his face with mangoes, papaya, bananas etc.
He reckons fruit is so expensive in Scotland (and shiat quality anyway) that he rarely eats it.
 
2014-02-01 01:29:05 AM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: make me some tea: RayD8: make me some tea: Yeah, shiat's getting real here. This is Folsom Lake, which is a major part of the water supply for the Sacramento area. I took this pic a couple weekends ago.

[scontent-a-lax.xx.fbcdn.net image 850x637]

Looks more like a small pond than a lake. That looks pretty farking bad.

The normal water level is up by that line of green. It's at least 100' down, maybe more. I had to walk about a mile from the parking lot "shore" over dry land to get to the water's edge. It's only 20% full now and dropping. They cut the flow to the American River a few weeks ago to mitigate the loss of water. We got a little bit of rain the last couple of days but it's not going to help much.

Here's another view looking the other direction:

[fbcdn-sphotos-d-a.akamaihd.net image 720x540]

Granite Bay view?


Yep. Parked at Beals Point car-park and wandered down. There's a bunch of people out there just milling around and taking it in, it's quite the spectacle.
 
2014-02-01 01:29:30 AM
There's not much snow in them thar hills.

A coworker was telling me last weekend he was at a ski resort in socal with plenty of man-made snow. So much for conservation, right?
 
2014-02-01 01:29:41 AM

Urinal Cake Mix: Oh come on. Let's just drain Shasta and call it good, k?



Right now Shasta is below these levels:
www.americansouthwest.net
 
2014-02-01 01:30:31 AM

gingerjet: FTFA where much of the nation's food is grown

Iowa, Nebraska, and Minnesota would like a word with you.


Well they grow the Tomato's you get mid winter etc. Sure the Midwest grows grains but a good bit of that is getting shifted to fuel production to my understanding
 
2014-02-01 01:30:32 AM

CipollinaFan: Maybe growing most of the nation's food in a desert was not such a good idea.


You understand that it wasn't really a desert until they dammed the rivers and diverted the water to LA, right?
 
2014-02-01 01:31:31 AM

Mitch Taylor's Bro: Don't worry, things can't be that bad if they're still allowing the oil companies to use what little fresh water we have to flush oil out of the ground.


this.
 
2014-02-01 01:31:48 AM

RayD8: Somewhat off topic but still to do with fruit.

I had a guy here for the last 3 days in Singapore who is from Aberdeen.



I thought you were headed in another direction with this
 
2014-02-01 01:32:10 AM
hey guys, everyone should know this.  So my buddy was looking for an intern position for his Engineering degree..

Well at one of his interviews (with a very big defense contractor) it was dropped that they had (as he expressed interest in working on this project) completed a successful desal technique that is so low energy as to end the water crisis.

They're probably going to sit on this for the next decade or two while we all suffer till peak water hits and they can make their killing.
 
2014-02-01 01:33:00 AM

phlegmmo: Urinal Cake Mix: Oh come on. Let's just drain Shasta and call it good, k?


Right now Shasta is below these levels:
[www.americansouthwest.net image 850x637]


Oof. That's a good hundred feet down from normal too.
 
2014-02-01 01:33:01 AM

make me some tea: RayD8: make me some tea: Yeah, shiat's getting real here. This is Folsom Lake, which is a major part of the water supply for the Sacramento area. I took this pic a couple weekends ago.

[scontent-a-lax.xx.fbcdn.net image 850x637]

Looks more like a small pond than a lake. That looks pretty farking bad.

The normal water level is up by that line of green. It's at least 100' down, maybe more. I had to walk about a mile from the parking lot "shore" over dry land to get to the water's edge. It's only 20% full now and dropping. They cut the flow to the American River a few weeks ago to mitigate the loss of water. We got a little bit of rain the last couple of days but it's not going to help much.

Here's another view looking the other direction:

[fbcdn-sphotos-d-a.akamaihd.net image 720x540]


WOW! I think you may be in for a lean time. You will have to shower like the French.(weekly)
 
2014-02-01 01:34:04 AM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: JonBuck: They can't build this desalination plant fast enough. Won't be running for a couple years.

IT'S ABOUT GODDAMNED TIME

/FFS, I've been saying for YEARS this was what we needed to do
//and when we had a working nuke powerplant on the coast, we could have built one next door and had the power required right there
///But NOOOoooooo...


You can get enough water out of desal to provide for a city's population and avoid the sorts of restrictions which prevent people from showering and flushing but you'd still have brown lawns and there's no way you can irrigate a substantial area of crops.

/Lives Adelaide, South Australia, population a bit over 1 million. We've built our desal plant for drought years which stop the Murray River flowing coz most of our suburban supply comes from there. The irrigators along the Murray are highly efficient with drip systems and all that stuff having gone in over the last 20 years or more but they get their entitlements heavily reduced and eventually completely stopped before they stop diverting river supply to Adelaide, and the desal would only kick in when that looked unsustainable. It's expensive.
 
2014-02-01 01:35:41 AM

phlegmmo: Urinal Cake Mix: Oh come on. Let's just drain Shasta and call it good, k?


Right now Shasta is below these levels:
[www.americansouthwest.net image 850x637]


When I was a kid Shasta got down far enough to need to take a bus all the way across to the Cave. Normally, it's this little ferry. The houseboat business is sure gonna be dead.
 
2014-02-01 01:35:47 AM

super_grass: Better yet, find a way for the cooling towers to use sea water and collect fresh water from the cooling stacks too.


No can do. Sea water gets mighty corrosive when enough of the water evaporates, and you don't want cooling pipes to suddenly start falling apart at a nuke plant. You think the bottom rusting out of some tanks in West Virginia was bad....

/and for those blaming fracking, you can't use sea water for that either
//not unless you want to turn all the groundwater to saltwater, at least according to the environmentalists
///not worth the risk, when fracking is only using 0.3% of the total fresh water consumed, anyway
 
2014-02-01 01:36:31 AM

RayD8: WOW! I think you may be in for a lean time. You will have to shower like the French.(weekly)


I'm from Las Vegas, so I'm no stranger to water issues, but this is entirely different because Sac area isn't accustomed to rationing. They're asking residential customers to cut their water use as much as possible. Shut off water to lawns, take 5min showers, etc. I'm pretty sure it's going to be mandatory soon. This summer is gonna be a biatch unless the pattern changes.
 
2014-02-01 01:38:39 AM
We'll they can come here and shovel all the snow they want for free to take back home.
/loved the asshats from CA talking shiat in the polar vortex threads.
 
2014-02-01 01:40:45 AM

phlegmmo: Urinal Cake Mix: Oh come on. Let's just drain Shasta and call it good, k?


Right now Shasta is below these levels:


We drove through last summer on our way to WA and Shasta looked extremely low. I hadn't been through that way in years, so I really had no point of reference.

Here in So Cal, we have this little lake called Mystic Lake (between Moreno Valley and Hemet) that was 'full' when I started working out that way in '06. We just drove by it in December and it is pretty much dried up.
 
2014-02-01 01:41:09 AM
Don't get too sassy, subby, or a short Polish rapist pedophile may cut your nose with a switchblade.
 
2014-02-01 01:41:13 AM

mikaloyd: RayD8: Somewhat off topic but still to do with fruit.

I had a guy here for the last 3 days in Singapore who is from Aberdeen.


I thought you were headed in another direction with this


Nice one. Although the fact you got something from the first 2 sentences tells me you may be feeling a bit fruity?
 
2014-02-01 01:41:20 AM

bromah: hey guys, everyone should know this.  So my buddy was looking for an intern position for his Engineering degree..

Well at one of his interviews (with a very big defense contractor) it was dropped that they had (as he expressed interest in working on this project) completed a successful desal technique that is so low energy as to end the water crisis.

They're probably going to sit on this for the next decade or two while we all suffer till peak water hits and they can make their killing.


I'm not saying your story sounds like bullshiat, but you're story sounds like bullshiat
 
2014-02-01 01:42:54 AM
Bakersfield will go from post-apocalyptic hellscape with ravenous bands of barbarians to a post-apocalyptic hellscape with ravenous bands of thirsty barbarians. I'll probably read about the difference before I notice it.
 
2014-02-01 01:43:28 AM

make me some tea: RayD8: WOW! I think you may be in for a lean time. You will have to shower like the French.(weekly)

I'm from Las Vegas, so I'm no stranger to water issues, but this is entirely different because Sac area isn't accustomed to rationing. They're asking residential customers to cut their water use as much as possible. Shut off water to lawns, take 5min showers, etc. I'm pretty sure it's going to be mandatory soon. This summer is gonna be a biatch unless the pattern changes.


Oh, rationing isn't new to Sac by any means

/have we reached "brick in the toilet and only flush solids" stage yet?
 
2014-02-01 01:43:43 AM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: Maybe the fact that there's no water TO deliver might be a factor

/reservoirs ain't lookin' too good around here
//and damn little snow up top
///this is gonna suck hard come Summer


Yeah.  It sounds like they should have taken action earlier.

Gyrfalcon: You might put some blame on the agribusinesses who run the farms, sparky. The FARMERS knew a few decades ago it was insanity to keep pouring water on the fields--but the agribusinesses needed those rich, creamy water subsidies, which made it more cost-effective to keep dumping water all over the place rather than switching over to less wasteful drip-irrigation systems.


This.  Charge the same price to all users and we wouldn't be hitting the wall like this now.
 
2014-02-01 01:44:35 AM

Marcus Aurelius: Wait until they find out about Lake Meade.

Maybe they should move to where the food is.


There are several states that get water from the Colorado river basin.  I'm pretty sure Cal agriculture gets the most.  It all begins on the western slope of the rockies and flows into Lakes Powell, Mead, and several others.  Lots of political stuff with decades old agreements between the states and now Mexico too.  I can't find it, but a local columnist got a quote from a higher up in the Southern Nevada Water Administration who said if we stopped watering every single yard in the vegas valley it wouldn't make a damn bit of difference.  Not sure who was supposed to have said it, but he may have lungs full of salt water too.  Very bad for glass.

I check out this site from time to time to see how things are with the snowpack and lake levels.

 http://www.water-data.com/
 
2014-02-01 01:45:09 AM

ladodger34: phlegmmo: Urinal Cake Mix: Oh come on. Let's just drain Shasta and call it good, k?


Right now Shasta is below these levels:

We drove through last summer on our way to WA and Shasta looked extremely low. I hadn't been through that way in years, so I really had no point of reference.

Here in So Cal, we have this little lake called Mystic Lake (between Moreno Valley and Hemet) that was 'full' when I started working out that way in '06. We just drove by it in December and it is pretty much dried up.


I know Mystic Lake. Haven't been out that way in over 10 years, but that used to be a pretty good-sized.
 
2014-02-01 01:45:55 AM

Mitch Taylor's Bro: Don't worry, things can't be that bad if they're still allowing the oil companies to use what little fresh water we have to flush oil out of the ground.


Oil companies have a lot more money to, uh, "donate."


Nexzus: As a citizen of the country north of the USA, incidentally containing 20% of the world's fresh water and .5% of the world's population: every time I hear about another water shortage in our neighbours to the south, I get a tiny bit more nervous.

This shiat only seems to be getting worse. People will biatch and moan and make-do over super-expensive or no oil. They may get shooty if you do the same with water.



No worries you've got a few decades before things get shooty.

i.imgur.com
 
2014-02-01 01:48:01 AM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: make me some tea: RayD8: WOW! I think you may be in for a lean time. You will have to shower like the French.(weekly)

I'm from Las Vegas, so I'm no stranger to water issues, but this is entirely different because Sac area isn't accustomed to rationing. They're asking residential customers to cut their water use as much as possible. Shut off water to lawns, take 5min showers, etc. I'm pretty sure it's going to be mandatory soon. This summer is gonna be a biatch unless the pattern changes.

Oh, rationing isn't new to Sac by any means

/have we reached "brick in the toilet and only flush solids" stage yet?


We still get plenty of fog, it might be time to invest in moisture collection systems.
 
2014-02-01 01:48:25 AM

make me some tea: RayD8: WOW! I think you may be in for a lean time. You will have to shower like the French.(weekly)

I'm from Las Vegas, so I'm no stranger to water issues, but this is entirely different because Sac area isn't accustomed to rationing. They're asking residential customers to cut their water use as much as possible. Shut off water to lawns, take 5min showers, etc. I'm pretty sure it's going to be mandatory soon. This summer is gonna be a biatch unless the pattern changes.


I'm originally from Western Australia. There has been water restrictions in place there for most summers as far back as I can remember.
Reservoir levels have been at 15-20% for years.
Australia is in the midst of a terrible heat wave as we speak, so no relief in sight.
Globally, things are going to get worse.
 
2014-02-01 01:49:29 AM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: Maybe the fact that there's no water TO deliver might be a factor

/reservoirs ain't lookin' too good around here
//and damn little snow up top
///this is gonna suck hard come Summer


You live in California; be honest, it sucks in Spring, Fall, and Winter too.

Gyrfalcon:
I wonder how much water would be saved if we banned lawns--and ONLY lawns--in So Cal. I bet it would be a lot.

The answer: more than enough. It's farking stupid that people have lawns in deserts. And golf courses, being giant lawns, are the worst. They have both of them out here in Arizona too, which is extra stupid.

I've got a better solution though, that won't end up with  SWAT teams being used for code enforcement required. Simply stop subsidizing the cost of water. You see, I don't conserve water at all. I leave the sink running while I brush my teeth, I run the dishwasher as many times I need to, I take long showers. And the water usage part of my bill every month is $2. Literally $2. I could use ten times as much water as I do every month and the bill would still be negligible. There's absolutely no incentive to save water.

Now, I live in a freakin desert. There's no way the water I use actually costs $2. Somewhere along the line some asshat in the government decided to encourage growth or "help" the poor or more likely just wanted to play golf, and now water usage isn't remotely related to water costs. There's no reason not to use as much as you want, and all us jerks can have lawns and long showers and golf courses right up until nothing comes out of the tap.

So get rid of that crap. Let water cost what it actually costs, and you don't have to make any rules about water usage. Suddenly lawns are too expensive, people shut off the water the way they shut off lights, and golf courses go out of business. Best of all, if the cost of water goes up, the usage goes down and the water lasts longer. It's freakin' amazing what letting people see the actual cost of their stuff will do. And, as an extra bonus, you don't have to make any new rules to enforce. No SWAT raids for water violations, no spying on you to see your usage, no drones checking your swimming pool, none of that. Just plain simply economics to fix the problem. That's what we need in Arizona, and that's what you need in California.
 
2014-02-01 01:51:03 AM
Maybe less golf courses, artificial lakes in housing communities, public fountains and water parks will help...

Don't be like AZ, guys, it's not cool. You out in a water waster like the fountain in Fountain Hills, and you'll have no one to blame but yourselves.

Thus also serves as a reminder that people have to quit complaining when it rains(or snows in the high country), and you also have to stop cheering when spring come quickly, that snowmelt has to disappear at a FL fairly consistent rate to keep the reservoirs full all summer, mementos fast, and the extra just washes down the river.
 
2014-02-01 01:51:12 AM

knbwhite: I can't find it, but a local columnist got a quote from a higher up in the Southern Nevada Water Administration who said if we stopped watering every single yard in the vegas valley it wouldn't make a damn bit of difference.


Every little bit helps.
 
2014-02-01 01:51:43 AM

Mister Peejay: Nexzus: As a citizen of the country north of the USA, incidentally containing 20% of the world's fresh water and .5% of the world's population: every time I hear about another water shortage in our neighbours to the south, I get a tiny bit more nervous.

This shiat only seems to be getting worse. People will biatch and moan and make-do over super-expensive or no oil. They may get shooty if you do the same with water.

I find it kinda funny (funny "duh" not funny "ha-ha") when people start mumbling about getting water from the Great Lakes.

Ever look at the Great Lakes watershed?  Most of it is in Canada.  That's Canadian water.


Lucky for us Americans, Canadian water is protected by the Canadian military, and our military is more than capable of handling a bunch of drunken horsemen in red coats.
 
2014-02-01 01:53:55 AM

RayD8: I'm originally from Western Australia. There has been water restrictions in place there for most summers as far back as I can remember.
Reservoir levels have been at 15-20% for years.
Australia is in the midst of a terrible heat wave as we speak, so no relief in sight.
Globally, things are going to get worse.


Ugh. Yeah I've been following the news on that...

I just moved to California from NYC a few months ago but people were telling me that last summer here broke a bunch of heat records (117F). Lovely... I'm gonna have to buy an AC unit for the place from the looks of it.
 
2014-02-01 01:54:55 AM

That Guy Jeff: MaudlinMutantMollusk: Maybe the fact that there's no water TO deliver might be a factor

/reservoirs ain't lookin' too good around here
//and damn little snow up top
///this is gonna suck hard come Summer

You live in California; be honest, it sucks in Spring, Fall, and Winter too.

Gyrfalcon:
I wonder how much water would be saved if we banned lawns--and ONLY lawns--in So Cal. I bet it would be a lot.

The answer: more than enough. It's farking stupid that people have lawns in deserts. And golf courses, being giant lawns, are the worst. They have both of them out here in Arizona too, which is extra stupid.

I've got a better solution though, that won't end up with  SWAT teams being used for code enforcement required. Simply stop subsidizing the cost of water. You see, I don't conserve water at all. I leave the sink running while I brush my teeth, I run the dishwasher as many times I need to, I take long showers. And the water usage part of my bill every month is $2. Literally $2. I could use ten times as much water as I do every month and the bill would still be negligible. There's absolutely no incentive to save water.

Now, I live in a freakin desert. There's no way the water I use actually costs $2. Somewhere along the line some asshat in the government decided to encourage growth or "help" the poor or more likely just wanted to play golf, and now water usage isn't remotely related to water costs. There's no reason not to use as much as you want, and all us jerks can have lawns and long showers and golf courses right up until nothing comes out of the tap.

So get rid of that crap. Let water cost what it actually costs, and you don't have to make any rules about water usage. Suddenly lawns are too expensive, people shut off the water the way they shut off lights, and golf courses go out of business. Best of all, if the cost of water goes up, the usage goes down and the water lasts longer. It's freakin' amazing what letting people see the actual cost of their stuff will do. And, as an extra bonus, you don't have to make any new rules to enforce. No SWAT raids for water violations, no spying on you to see your usage, no drones checking your swimming pool, none of that. Just plain simply economics to fix the problem. That's what we need in Arizona, and that's what you need in California.


But no one wants the actual free market. The (R) s want to play golf with the money they get in kickbacks from the subsidized water companies and the (D) s want to send the SWAT team in on you and spy on you with drones because they are Stalinist Statists.
 
2014-02-01 01:57:00 AM
talk about whiny privileged californians...it's like less than a buck at 7-11 for a HUGE bottle of the stuff. get over yourselves.
 
2014-02-01 01:59:26 AM

Marcus Aurelius: Wait until they find out about Lake Meade.

Maybe they should move to where the food is.


There's an entire lake made out of mead!?.
 
2014-02-01 01:59:34 AM
RayD8:...
I'm originally from Western Australia. There has been water restrictions in place there for most summers as far back as I can remember.
Reservoir levels have been at 15-20% for years.
Australia is in the midst of a terrible heat wave as we speak, so no relief in sight.
Globally, things are going to get worse.


Western Australia is in a bad way waterwise. Economy is otherwise booming but the annual rainfall to the south-west corner of WA (which is where most of the population is) dropped from about the mid 1970s and just never came back.

The heat is on in Australia's south-east (that's a whole lot of desert away from Western Australia) but its not drought condtions currently. Big drought ended a few years ago.
 
2014-02-01 02:01:41 AM

CygnusDarius: Marcus Aurelius: Wait until they find out about Lake Meade.

Maybe they should move to where the food is.

There's an entire lake made out of mead!?.


Yes, but I wouldn't recommend drinking it. It'll fark you up.
 
2014-02-01 02:03:04 AM

make me some tea: RayD8: I'm originally from Western Australia. There has been water restrictions in place there for most summers as far back as I can remember.
Reservoir levels have been at 15-20% for years.
Australia is in the midst of a terrible heat wave as we speak, so no relief in sight.
Globally, things are going to get worse.

Ugh. Yeah I've been following the news on that...

I just moved to California from NYC a few months ago but people were telling me that last summer here broke a bunch of heat records (117F). Lovely... I'm gonna have to buy an AC unit for the place from the looks of it.


I'm in Singapore. Average 28-32 celcius but humidity around 80%.
Could not live without AC.
 
2014-02-01 02:03:29 AM

Oldiron_79: That Guy Jeff: MaudlinMutantMollusk: Maybe the fact that there's no water TO deliver might be a factor

/reservoirs ain't lookin' too good around here
//and damn little snow up top
///this is gonna suck hard come Summer

You live in California; be honest, it sucks in Spring, Fall, and Winter too.

Gyrfalcon:
I wonder how much water would be saved if we banned lawns--and ONLY lawns--in So Cal. I bet it would be a lot.

The answer: more than enough. It's farking stupid that people have lawns in deserts. And golf courses, being giant lawns, are the worst. They have both of them out here in Arizona too, which is extra stupid.

I've got a better solution though, that won't end up with  SWAT teams being used for code enforcement required. Simply stop subsidizing the cost of water. You see, I don't conserve water at all. I leave the sink running while I brush my teeth, I run the dishwasher as many times I need to, I take long showers. And the water usage part of my bill every month is $2. Literally $2. I could use ten times as much water as I do every month and the bill would still be negligible. There's absolutely no incentive to save water.

Now, I live in a freakin desert. There's no way the water I use actually costs $2. Somewhere along the line some asshat in the government decided to encourage growth or "help" the poor or more likely just wanted to play golf, and now water usage isn't remotely related to water costs. There's no reason not to use as much as you want, and all us jerks can have lawns and long showers and golf courses right up until nothing comes out of the tap.

So get rid of that crap. Let water cost what it actually costs, and you don't have to make any rules about water usage. Suddenly lawns are too expensive, people shut off the water the way they shut off lights, and golf courses go out of business. Best of all, if the cost of water goes up, the usage goes down and the water lasts longer. It's freakin' amazing what letting people see the actual cos ...


I'm pretty sure playing golf at the expense of the taxpayer and putting the boot to as many people as you can stuff in prison is non-partisan. It's "the people spending taxpayer money/making money from the prison system" vs "the taxpayer/possible future participants in the prison system", not left vs right.
 
2014-02-01 02:05:56 AM

RayD8: make me some tea: RayD8: I'm originally from Western Australia. There has been water restrictions in place there for most summers as far back as I can remember.
Reservoir levels have been at 15-20% for years.
Australia is in the midst of a terrible heat wave as we speak, so no relief in sight.
Globally, things are going to get worse.

Ugh. Yeah I've been following the news on that...

I just moved to California from NYC a few months ago but people were telling me that last summer here broke a bunch of heat records (117F). Lovely... I'm gonna have to buy an AC unit for the place from the looks of it.

I'm in Singapore. Average 28-32 celcius but humidity around 80%.
Could not live without AC.


Yuck, that was summers in New York, and yes we ran AC all summer as a matter of survival. Our landlord here told us we probably won't need AC but I have serious doubts about that.
 
2014-02-01 02:06:04 AM

That Guy Jeff: So get rid of that crap. Let water cost what it actually costs, and you don't have to make any rules about water usage. Suddenly lawns are too expensive, people shut off the water the way they shut off lights, and golf courses go out of business. Best of all, if the cost of water goes up, the usage goes down and the water lasts longer. It's freakin' amazing what letting people see the actual cost of their stuff will do.


Pretty much spot on.  Stop creating the problem.

oh noes, we'll have to do without avocados and almonds
we'll survive Cal.  Get over yourselves.
 
2014-02-01 02:07:46 AM

Aussie_As: RayD8:...
I'm originally from Western Australia. There has been water restrictions in place there for most summers as far back as I can remember.
Reservoir levels have been at 15-20% for years.
Australia is in the midst of a terrible heat wave as we speak, so no relief in sight.
Globally, things are going to get worse.

Western Australia is in a bad way waterwise. Economy is otherwise booming but the annual rainfall to the south-west corner of WA (which is where most of the population is) dropped from about the mid 1970s and just never came back.

The heat is on in Australia's south-east (that's a whole lot of desert away from Western Australia) but its not drought condtions currently. Big drought ended a few years ago.


Yeah mate. Look at the bushfire situation and lack of water supplies.
I know fires are part of the deal, but seems to be increasing in severity yearly.
The whole Murray fiasco is not helping much either.
 
2014-02-01 02:07:55 AM
perhaps the drought isnt permanent?
 
2014-02-01 02:08:56 AM

That Guy Jeff: So get rid of that crap. Let water cost what it actually costs, and you don't have to make any rules about water usage. Suddenly lawns are too expensive, people shut off the water the way they shut off lights, and golf courses go out of business. Best of all, if the cost of water goes up, the usage goes down and the water lasts longer. It's freakin' amazing what letting people see the actual cost of their stuff will do. And, as an extra bonus, you don't have to make any new rules to enforce. No SWAT raids for water violations, no spying on you to see your usage, no drones checking your swimming pool, none of that. Just plain simply economics to fix the problem. That's what we need in Arizona, and that's what you need in California.


The SNWA in Vegas did exactly that, and also paid people to convert their lush lawns to desert landscaping, up to $1,500. I had a house with a huge mulberry tree and front lawn and my water bill in the summer was $130 or more. The new owner of my old house converted to desert landscaping.
 
2014-02-01 02:09:48 AM

mikaloyd: perhaps the drought isnt permanent?


Much like an earthquake, we never really know when it's gonna end until it does.
 
2014-02-01 02:10:23 AM

mikaloyd: looks like the East coast can start importing food from europe right away


Or supplying a good amount of our food like we already do. So we lose some specialty food, but we get to watch California slowly crumble in exchange.
 
2014-02-01 02:11:35 AM

make me some tea: MaudlinMutantMollusk: make me some tea: RayD8: WOW! I think you may be in for a lean time. You will have to shower like the French.(weekly)

I'm from Las Vegas, so I'm no stranger to water issues, but this is entirely different because Sac area isn't accustomed to rationing. They're asking residential customers to cut their water use as much as possible. Shut off water to lawns, take 5min showers, etc. I'm pretty sure it's going to be mandatory soon. This summer is gonna be a biatch unless the pattern changes.

Oh, rationing isn't new to Sac by any means

/have we reached "brick in the toilet and only flush solids" stage yet?

We still get plenty of fog, it might be time to invest in moisture collection systems.


I'm already praying to Shai-Hulud; getting fitted for my stilsuit next week.
 
2014-02-01 02:14:15 AM

That Guy Jeff: MaudlinMutantMollusk: Maybe the fact that there's no water TO deliver might be a factor

/reservoirs ain't lookin' too good around here
//and damn little snow up top
///this is gonna suck hard come Summer

You live in California; be honest, it sucks in Spring, Fall, and Winter too.


Ahahahahaha... no

/if you're already here, leave
//if you're not here, don't come here: it sucks just as badly as you believe it does
 
2014-02-01 02:15:03 AM

make me some tea: That Guy Jeff: So get rid of that crap. Let water cost what it actually costs, and you don't have to make any rules about water usage. Suddenly lawns are too expensive, people shut off the water the way they shut off lights, and golf courses go out of business. Best of all, if the cost of water goes up, the usage goes down and the water lasts longer. It's freakin' amazing what letting people see the actual cost of their stuff will do. And, as an extra bonus, you don't have to make any new rules to enforce. No SWAT raids for water violations, no spying on you to see your usage, no drones checking your swimming pool, none of that. Just plain simply economics to fix the problem. That's what we need in Arizona, and that's what you need in California.

The SNWA in Vegas did exactly that, and also paid people to convert their lush lawns to desert landscaping, up to $1,500. I had a house with a huge mulberry tree and front lawn and my water bill in the summer was $130 or more. The new owner of my old house converted to desert landscaping.


In West Oz, they charged you incrementally. A certain amount was the standard. Anything over and above, they hit you hard.
How long are you talking for $130.00? and what sort of consumption.
 
2014-02-01 02:16:01 AM

RayD8: Aussie_As: RayD8:...

Yeah mate. Look at the bushfire situation and lack of water supplies.
I know fires are part of the deal, but seems to be increasing in severity yearly.
The whole Murray fiasco is not helping much either.


The whole Murray fiasco is a great metaphor for Australian environmental politics in general. It was a huge issue right until the rains came back to Victoria in 2009 or 2010 and now the system is fairly full again, and the political impetus to redesign water use in the Murray-Darling basin is now not really there.

So next drought will be a repeat of the same schmozzle as last time with all of the same butthurt and biatching. Yay!
 
2014-02-01 02:18:34 AM

mikaloyd: perhaps the drought isnt permanent?


I heard a few years ago that a good bit of the problem is due to using exceptionally wet years as the baseline for calculating who gets how much water. If the assumption is that there should be X acre feet of water to divvy up, shiat hits the fan when we only have X/2 to go around.

Back to watering the garden once a week. fark, I was going to try growing basil this year, too.
 
2014-02-01 02:19:19 AM

Lee Jackson Beauregard: Nope, no gorebull warming here.


Meanwhile in Wisconsin:

img.fark.net
 
2014-02-01 02:22:13 AM

make me some tea: MaudlinMutantMollusk: make me some tea: RayD8: WOW! I think you may be in for a lean time. You will have to shower like the French.(weekly)

I'm from Las Vegas, so I'm no stranger to water issues, but this is entirely different because Sac area isn't accustomed to rationing. They're asking residential customers to cut their water use as much as possible. Shut off water to lawns, take 5min showers, etc. I'm pretty sure it's going to be mandatory soon. This summer is gonna be a biatch unless the pattern changes.

Oh, rationing isn't new to Sac by any means

/have we reached "brick in the toilet and only flush solids" stage yet?

We still get plenty of fog, it might be time to invest in moisture collection systems.


I was thinking about that when I was going through my own water woes. I have this roll around AC that I use when I really need it. It blows the hot air out the window and when I run it all day I have to drain a gallon or two of water from it every day. And that's kind of a lot of water getting pulled out of the Arizona air in June. I wonder how much water a built in AC in your area drains onto the ground.
 
2014-02-01 02:26:10 AM

Myth Sammich: Lee Jackson Beauregard: Nope, no gorebull warming here.

Meanwhile in Wisconsin:

[img.fark.net image 850x479]


Why is Wisconsin being bombarded by purple dots?
 
2014-02-01 02:28:08 AM
Saw this graph in the paper today:

planetindistress.files.wordpress.com

CA could be in for another hundred years of this.
 
2014-02-01 02:31:16 AM

Aussie_As: RayD8: Aussie_As: RayD8:...

Yeah mate. Look at the bushfire situation and lack of water supplies.
I know fires are part of the deal, but seems to be increasing in severity yearly.
The whole Murray fiasco is not helping much either.

The whole Murray fiasco is a great metaphor for Australian environmental politics in general. It was a huge issue right until the rains came back to Victoria in 2009 or 2010 and now the system is fairly full again, and the political impetus to redesign water use in the Murray-Darling basin is now not really there.

So next drought will be a repeat of the same schmozzle as last time with all of the same butthurt and biatching. Yay!


Yeah geez, you wouldn't start preparing for the next similar situation would you?
Labor/LNP.....either way not much foresight into a major problem affecting a huge number of people and environment.
 
2014-02-01 02:37:18 AM

CipollinaFan: Maybe growing most of the nation's food in a desert was not such a good idea.


noirwhale.files.wordpress.com
Disagrees.
 
2014-02-01 02:45:11 AM

Myth Sammich: Lee Jackson Beauregard: Nope, no gorebull warming here.

Meanwhile in Wisconsin:

[img.fark.net image 850x479]


Meanwhile, on the rest of the planet:
i.imgur.com
 
2014-02-01 02:49:06 AM

Nexzus: As a citizen of the country north of the USA, incidentally containing 20% of the world's fresh water and .5% of the world's population: every time I hear about another water shortage in our neighbours to the south, I get a tiny bit more nervous.


You'll see a pipeline from the Columbia River to California long before you see US troops killing for Timbits.  If things get really desperate, they can build canals and tunnels from the Mississippi to the southwest so that California can have more of the Colorado.
 
2014-02-01 02:52:50 AM

Gyrfalcon: Ha ha.

I'm anxiously awaiting when we get our 50-gal/day mandatory water rationing. We did that during the last really bad drought in 1976ish, IIRC. That was fun. Not. No flush-ie toilet, bathing every other day, no watering lawns...good times. Cannot WAIT for the screaming from the HOAs, though! Watching golf courses get brown & crunchy in the searing So Cal sun...

50  gallons a DAY is rationing to you? What the fark is wrong with you?

A toilet uses 1,5 gallons nowadays or half that with the little flush button.
 
2014-02-01 02:52:53 AM
Desalination plants have been on the drawing boards for decades. NIMBY!
There is also a technology called cogeneration whereby excess heat from plants that generate electricity is used for desalination.

We have been through this before. I used to take showers standing in a 50-gallon plastic tub. That was 1976.
 
2014-02-01 02:53:36 AM

generallyso: Myth Sammich: Lee Jackson Beauregard: Nope, no gorebull warming here.

Meanwhile in Wisconsin:

[img.fark.net image 850x479]

Meanwhile, on the rest of the planet:
[i.imgur.com image 640x694]


Touche.
 
2014-02-01 02:53:44 AM

Lee Jackson Beauregard: Nope, no gorebull warming here.


The lack of rainfall is due to a ridge of high pressure that has been stationary off the Cali coast for a number of months.  In the past, some of these persistent high pressure zones have lasted years.  As to if air or sea temperature is to blame, we can't say.
 
2014-02-01 02:53:47 AM
They should start installing these everywhere.
Obscure?

static4.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2014-02-01 02:55:36 AM

Mister Peejay: I find it kinda funny (funny "duh" not funny "ha-ha") when people start mumbling about getting water from the Great Lakes.

Ever look at the Great Lakes watershed?  Most of it is in Canada.  That's Canadian water.


For the moment.
 
2014-02-01 02:55:57 AM

Mark Ratner: Too bad it is really expensive to desalinate the ocean water.


No kidding.  Think of all the salt we'd have.
 
2014-02-01 02:58:06 AM

Gyrfalcon: Watching golf courses get brown & crunchy in the searing So Cal sun...


If So Cal is like central Arizona, those golf courses are legally required to utilize gray water from waste-water treatment facilities and not potable water.  Same with large parks and greenbelts in neighborhoods.


/don't drink water from the purple pipes
 
2014-02-01 02:59:57 AM

Smeggy Smurf: Ah yes, control of the food supply just in time to manufacture a crisis.  Well played Fartbongo


You know, every time I come back here from reddit and see retarded comments like this I wish there was a farking downvote button on Fark too.
 
2014-02-01 03:01:23 AM

Dinjiin: Lee Jackson Beauregard: Nope, no gorebull warming here.

The lack of rainfall is due to a ridge of high pressure that has been stationary off the Cali coast for a number of months.  In the past, some of these persistent high pressure zones have lasted years.  As to if air or sea temperature is to blame, we can't say.


Sea temperatures are average, within the norm. Sea temperatures were lower than average during the summer months. They have risen slightly due to the high pressure and extended warm weather and sunshine.

It's just weather. You get different weather that deviates from the mean every year. This year we are on the far side of the bell curve. Climatologists have said that in the 1500s there were 10-year droughts on the west coast. Apparently these were not caused by my SUV nor Al Gore's 747 taking hot laps around the planet.
 
2014-02-01 03:01:50 AM

Mark Ratner: They should start installing these everywhere.
Obscure?

[static4.wikia.nocookie.net image 700x994]


very obscure, obviously. what on earth is that thing?
 
2014-02-01 03:09:36 AM

Pincy: Mark Ratner: Too bad it is really expensive to desalinate the ocean water.

No kidding.  Think of all the salt we'd have.


Actually lowered salinity is part of what the problem is. Mind you this is all off the top of my head from taking a meteorology class eight years ago, but basically the more that polar ice caps and glaciers melt, the lower the salinity of the oceans becomes. There's a current that runs through most of the globe that is dependent on salinity, because salt water doesn't freeze until it's about 28 degrees or less. This means it sinks, which contributes to the movement of the current.

I realize you'd have to build scores of plants to affect salinity on a level that would raise that level again, but... it certainly wouldn't hurt.
 
2014-02-01 03:15:26 AM

some_beer_drinker: Mark Ratner: They should start installing these everywhere.
Obscure?

[static4.wikia.nocookie.net image 700x994]

very obscure, obviously. what on earth is that thing?


It's an image from the movie Star Wars. Spock's uncle was a moisture farmer.
/live long and prosper
 
2014-02-01 03:16:20 AM
I drove by a house the other day that had it's sprinklers going and I reminded the homeowner that he could water his Bermuda grass day and night with our precious drinking water and it will still be brown. It's dormant in the winter.
 
2014-02-01 03:17:21 AM

Mark Ratner: some_beer_drinker: Mark Ratner: They should start installing these everywhere.
Obscure?

[static4.wikia.nocookie.net image 700x994]

very obscure, obviously. what on earth is that thing?

It's an image from the movie Star Wars. Spock's uncle was a moisture farmer.
/live long and prosper


Ah... Nanu Nanu, Pilgrim
 
2014-02-01 03:25:13 AM

Gyrfalcon: I'm anxiously awaiting when we get our 50-gal/day mandatory water rationing. We did that during the last really bad drought in 1976ish, IIRC. That was fun. Not. No flush-ie toilet, bathing every other day, no watering lawns...good times. Cannot WAIT for the screaming from the HOAs, though! Watching golf courses get brown & crunchy in the searing So Cal sun...


On the bright side, the last time water rationing happened, it led to this:

2.bp.blogspot.com

So maybe another big drought will be what finally makes these happen before 2015:

www.gadgetreview.com
 
2014-02-01 03:37:26 AM

Aussie_As: MaudlinMutantMollusk: JonBuck: They can't build this desalination plant fast enough. Won't be running for a couple years.

IT'S ABOUT GODDAMNED TIME

/FFS, I've been saying for YEARS this was what we needed to do
//and when we had a working nuke powerplant on the coast, we could have built one next door and had the power required right there
///But NOOOoooooo...

You can get enough water out of desal to provide for a city's population and avoid the sorts of restrictions which prevent people from showering and flushing but you'd still have brown lawns and there's no way you can irrigate a substantial area of crops.

/Lives Adelaide, South Australia, population a bit over 1 million. We've built our desal plant for drought years which stop the Murray River flowing coz most of our suburban supply comes from there. The irrigators along the Murray are highly efficient with drip systems and all that stuff having gone in over the last 20 years or more but they get their entitlements heavily reduced and eventually completely stopped before they stop diverting river supply to Adelaide, and the desal would only kick in when that looked unsustainable. It's expensive.


Good to see another South Aussie! But what we need now is for those farkers in the East to do what the Riverland did a couple of decades ago...CLOSED CHANNEL IRRIGATION. Oh, and stop trying to grow cotton in the middle of a bleeding desert.

Yes, we used to have water rationing. Odd numbers one day, evens the next. Heavens above if you watered on your 'off' day.

/that lake pic before does not bode well.
//hoping you get some rain - lots of it - soon
///slashies
 
2014-02-01 04:03:55 AM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: make me some tea: RayD8: WOW! I think you may be in for a lean time. You will have to shower like the French.(weekly)

I'm from Las Vegas, so I'm no stranger to water issues, but this is entirely different because Sac area isn't accustomed to rationing. They're asking residential customers to cut their water use as much as possible. Shut off water to lawns, take 5min showers, etc. I'm pretty sure it's going to be mandatory soon. This summer is gonna be a biatch unless the pattern changes.

Oh, rationing isn't new to Sac by any means

/have we reached "brick in the toilet and only flush solids" stage yet?


Most of the area doesn't seem to grasp just how bad this thing is. They're still at the "fingers in ears singing" stage.

i.imgur.com

Folsom and Sacramento proper are the only places in the area that are doing anything more than voluntary. It's a little ridiculous.
 
2014-02-01 04:16:25 AM

Jragghen: MaudlinMutantMollusk: make me some tea: RayD8: WOW! I think you may be in for a lean time. You will have to shower like the French.(weekly)

I'm from Las Vegas, so I'm no stranger to water issues, but this is entirely different because Sac area isn't accustomed to rationing. They're asking residential customers to cut their water use as much as possible. Shut off water to lawns, take 5min showers, etc. I'm pretty sure it's going to be mandatory soon. This summer is gonna be a biatch unless the pattern changes.

Oh, rationing isn't new to Sac by any means

/have we reached "brick in the toilet and only flush solids" stage yet?

Most of the area doesn't seem to grasp just how bad this thing is. They're still at the "fingers in ears singing" stage.

[i.imgur.com image 673x766]

Folsom and Sacramento proper are the only places in the area that are doing anything more than voluntary. It's a little ridiculous.


Well, when you got the KCRA weather boobs breathlessly telling you every morning how beautiful the weather is going to be today... every day... I think it lulls a lot of people (further) into their inherent apathy

/I live in that "information not available" area
//the part that's most in danger of wildfires
///I'm starting to get a teensy bit puckered
 
2014-02-01 04:34:52 AM

Mark Ratner: Too bad it is really expensive to desalinate the ocean water.


That's what the fracked oil is for. Learn 2 science.
 
2014-02-01 04:36:35 AM

Monkeyfark Ridiculous: Gyrfalcon: Monkeyfark Ridiculous: "Farmers pumped out the groundwater long ago, and massive state and federal water projects keep agriculture going in a place that has otherwise turned to arid and chemical-soaked fields of death."

I'm not 100% convinced that anyone should be sending their water to support agriculture in the arid chemical-soaked fields of death of farmers who long ago destroyed their own water supply.

Yeah, blame it on the farmers. It's all their fault that everyone wanted to eat food on the cheap, just like it's the miners in Appalachia's fault everyone wanted power on the cheap.

You might put some blame on the agribusinesses who run the farms, sparky. The FARMERS knew a few decades ago it was insanity to keep pouring water on the fields--but the agribusinesses needed those rich, creamy water subsidies, which made it more cost-effective to keep dumping water all over the place rather than switching over to less wasteful drip-irrigation systems.

Anyway, most of the extraneous water loss isn't due to agriculture, which is extremely necessary. It's due to the bullshiat big cities like the one I live in, with its nice green lawns, nice green golf courses and parks, and water-wasting fountains, air-chilling plants and leaky infrastructure that drips water all over the desert south of Bakersfield.

I wonder how much water would be saved if we banned lawns--and ONLY lawns--in So Cal. I bet it would be a lot.

I really don't care whether you call them "farmers" or "agribusinesses."

And I'm all in favour of reducing the kind of waste you mention - for instance I agree that there are a lot of lawns in a lot of places they shouldn't be and they are managed improperly - but watering lawns is a drop in the bucket next to agricultural and other commercial water use.


Yeah, but you're missing the point.

We NEED agriculture. We kind of need to have food. We DON'T need beautiful green lawns and beautiful green putting greens and deep green duck ponds. And I don't think it's as much of a drop in the bucket as you think, considering that there are exactly zero plans to require ANYONE to moderate their lawn-watering, while forcing farmers to moderate their crop-watering.

I mean, it's all well and good--and extremely true--to excoriate farms and agriculture for wasting water, which they do--but that doesn't mean that city-dwellers get a pass for drowning their lawns and taking 40-minute showers because individually they are just 'drops in the bucket". There are about 10 million drops down here, and that accounts for a hell of a lot of drops by the end of the day.

I remember mandatory residential rationing in central Cal when I was a kid. Nobody down here has ever done it. And really, it ought to be done that way. Farms and ranches ought to be priority for water, and households should be last. You can buy bottled drinking water and use deodorant and wet wipes and tell your HOAs to shove it or get a lot of green paint. Hell, Vegas instituted mandatory native-plant landscaping and managed to cut their water use by a third while their population nearly doubled. Lawn care is a hidden water waster that needs to be unhidden imo.
 
2014-02-01 04:39:33 AM
Months ago I said we're screwed if it doesn't start raining.  It never did, just an occasional light sprinkle.  Our water supply is so low that river fish are threatened (especially salmon spawning rivers).  Forced water rationing has already started in some counties.  It will only get worse.

I picked up some good habits during our last drought.  Don't leave the water running while brushing your teeth, etc.  I kept those good habits when the drought ended so there's no need for me to get back into drought mode.
 
2014-02-01 04:46:31 AM
 
2014-02-01 04:46:36 AM

pnkgtr: I drove by a house the other day that had it's sprinklers going and I reminded the homeowner that he could water his Bermuda grass day and night with our precious drinking water and it will still be brown. It's dormant in the winter.


I was visiting my grandfather in Michigan one Christmas. He took the time to get out a hose and water his lawn (which was buried under a foot of snow). Of course, he was senile by that time, and I didn't bother to tell him he was wasting water, mainly because he was busy telling me where Jimmy Hoffa was buried. And grandpa was a hell of a story teller.
 
2014-02-01 04:47:25 AM

DrPainMD: Mister Peejay: I find it kinda funny (funny "duh" not funny "ha-ha") when people start mumbling about getting water from the Great Lakes.

Ever look at the Great Lakes watershed?  Most of it is in Canada.  That's Canadian water.

For the moment.


as long as the pipes and pumps are on the American side, it's our water!
 
2014-02-01 04:48:46 AM
http://sunshinehours.wordpress.com/2014/01/19/drought-in-california-c o ol-pdo-and-warm-amo/

When the PDO is cool (which it is) and the AMO is warm (which it is) drought in California is going to happen.
 
2014-02-01 04:53:01 AM
California is a dessert. California is also a desert.

Use it accordingly.
 
2014-02-01 05:01:54 AM
It's almost as if everything in this country is set up to maximize the short-term profits of some very large corporations and fark everything else.

When the shiat hits the fan, the Heroic Job Creators fly off to their private islands.
 
2014-02-01 05:05:56 AM

jaerik: What's interesting is that Southern California, having been cut off the North and Central Valley regions (where most of the snowfall is) during the last big drought in the 70's, has been hoarding water in good times and stashing it underground storage and reservoirs.  We've also managed to cut our water use in many areas while growing population at the same time.

As such, while Brown declares a state of emergency, San Diego and other SoCal municipalities have no plans for rationing nor forced conservation at the moment.   It's pretty much NorCal and the Central Valley that are farked for a change.


Or, as people in this thread think of it, "the desert."

/Lives in Calif high desert
//Last I looked, LA and environs were classified semi-arid.
 
2014-02-01 05:18:46 AM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: That Guy Jeff: MaudlinMutantMollusk: Maybe the fact that there's no water TO deliver might be a factor

/reservoirs ain't lookin' too good around here
//and damn little snow up top
///this is gonna suck hard come Summer

You live in California; be honest, it sucks in Spring, Fall, and Winter too.

Ahahahahaha... no

/if you're already here, leave
//if you're not here, don't come here: it sucks just as badly as you believe it does


Been there done that, you can keep that shiaty state for as long as you still pretend like you like it.
 
2014-02-01 05:28:44 AM
It's clear that we've reached peak water.
 
2014-02-01 05:50:09 AM

Mister Peejay: Nexzus: As a citizen of the country north of the USA, incidentally containing 20% of the world's fresh water and .5% of the world's population: every time I hear about another water shortage in our neighbours to the south, I get a tiny bit more nervous.

This shiat only seems to be getting worse. People will biatch and moan and make-do over super-expensive or no oil. They may get shooty if you do the same with water.

I find it kinda funny (funny "duh" not funny "ha-ha") when people start mumbling about getting water from the Great Lakes.

Ever look at the Great Lakes watershed?  Most of it is in Canada.  That's Canadian water.


pixel.nymag.com
 
2014-02-01 06:28:39 AM

JonBuck: They can't build this desalination plant fast enough. Won't be running for a couple years.


And when it gets really bad, they'll use desalination plants like they do oil refineries: only when the demand for water passes the "torches and pitchforks" threshold.
 
2014-02-01 06:28:59 AM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: make me some tea: RayD8: WOW! I think you may be in for a lean time. You will have to shower like the French.(weekly)

I'm from Las Vegas, so I'm no stranger to water issues, but this is entirely different because Sac area isn't accustomed to rationing. They're asking residential customers to cut their water use as much as possible. Shut off water to lawns, take 5min showers, etc. I'm pretty sure it's going to be mandatory soon. This summer is gonna be a biatch unless the pattern changes.

Oh, rationing isn't new to Sac by any means

/have we reached "brick in the toilet and only flush solids" stage yet?


Remeber kids. If it's yellow let it mellow, If it's brown flush it down!
 
2014-02-01 06:31:53 AM
He has a solution:
www.badmovies.org

/Can't believe I am the first... you guys are slacking.
//Thank God mankind is here to guide nature so that we can put water where it is supposed to be & take it away from where nature put it.
 
2014-02-01 06:37:30 AM
California farmers were already using about all the water available after household use and have a lot more land they would like to irrigate if they had the water to, so the "Food grows where water flows" billboards along I-5 there are perpetual.  They fall kind of flat for me when I've been driving past cotton fields for half an hour, maybe they were put up by a weevil person.
 
2014-02-01 06:50:41 AM

Mister Peejay: Nexzus: As a citizen of the country north of the USA, incidentally containing 20% of the world's fresh water and .5% of the world's population: every time I hear about another water shortage in our neighbours to the south, I get a tiny bit more nervous.

This shiat only seems to be getting worse. People will biatch and moan and make-do over super-expensive or no oil. They may get shooty if you do the same with water.

I find it kinda funny (funny "duh" not funny "ha-ha") when people start mumbling about getting water from the Great Lakes.

Ever look at the Great Lakes watershed?  Most of it is in Canada.  That's Canadian water.


No most of it is in the states.

www.epa.gov
 
2014-02-01 07:28:16 AM

ZoSo_the_Crowe: Can we please ban lawns nationwide already?


Well, that seems extreme for the nation
There are ways to have "a yard" with drought tolerant plants - some people in the Keys landscape with large white gravel (saves on water but increases heat) - my mother cultivated weeds (not as uniform as a pool-table lawn but remains green when dry and requires no fertilizer) - and, of course, there have been reports of HOA-run areas where fined residents tried green spray paint.
How about we redefine "lawn"  to include "native plants and geographically suited materials" and not just "purchased sod that requires irrigatation, chemical intervention and gas-powered machinery to maintain"
Learn to love cactus and russian thistle and stop treating your yard as if it were a pedigreed teacup dog.

otoh? I am scared for California - "no water" for people sounds like the debate about lawns and landscaping is over - esp as fire season approaches
 
2014-02-01 07:35:07 AM

Gyrfalcon: Monkeyfark Ridiculous: Gyrfalcon: Monkeyfark Ridiculous: "Farmers pumped out the groundwater long ago, and massive state and federal water projects keep agriculture going in a place that has otherwise turned to arid and chemical-soaked fields of death."

I'm not 100% convinced that anyone should be sending their water to support agriculture in the arid chemical-soaked fields of death of farmers who long ago destroyed their own water supply.

Yeah, blame it on the farmers. It's all their fault that everyone wanted to eat food on the cheap, just like it's the miners in Appalachia's fault everyone wanted power on the cheap.

You might put some blame on the agribusinesses who run the farms, sparky. The FARMERS knew a few decades ago it was insanity to keep pouring water on the fields--but the agribusinesses needed those rich, creamy water subsidies, which made it more cost-effective to keep dumping water all over the place rather than switching over to less wasteful drip-irrigation systems.

Anyway, most of the extraneous water loss isn't due to agriculture, which is extremely necessary. It's due to the bullshiat big cities like the one I live in, with its nice green lawns, nice green golf courses and parks, and water-wasting fountains, air-chilling plants and leaky infrastructure that drips water all over the desert south of Bakersfield.

I wonder how much water would be saved if we banned lawns--and ONLY lawns--in So Cal. I bet it would be a lot.

I really don't care whether you call them "farmers" or "agribusinesses."

And I'm all in favour of reducing the kind of waste you mention - for instance I agree that there are a lot of lawns in a lot of places they shouldn't be and they are managed improperly - but watering lawns is a drop in the bucket next to agricultural and other commercial water use.

Yeah, but you're missing the point.

We NEED agriculture. We kind of need to have food. We DON'T need beautiful green lawns and beautiful green putting greens and deep gre ...



That is a fair point, to an extent. But we do NOT need to grow everything, everywhere, all the time, no matter how much water it takes. And many farms aren't even growing food in the first place.

And residential waste IS a tiny percentage of water use - that this very small percentage is made up of tens of millions of even tinier drops doesn't change that. If you want to use regulatory and police powertoconserve water, your efforts would tend to be better spent on leaks, agricultural use, industrial use, commercial use, public use, reclamation, etc ... household use would be towards the bottom of the priority list (and voluntary restrictions address a good deal of it anyway). Not that there's anything wrong with telling people to knock it off with all the farking lawn watering -- and it simply isn't true to say that this is not done at all -- but it is an odd piece of the puzzle to focus on.
 
2014-02-01 07:47:58 AM

make me some tea: knbwhite: I can't find it, but a local columnist got a quote from a higher up in the Southern Nevada Water Administration who said if we stopped watering every single yard in the vegas valley it wouldn't make a damn bit of difference.

Every little bit helps.


This
I've watched home water use restrictions (water lawns on certain days, etc) go from seasonal to all year long. Restaurants will give you water only if asked. Hotel rooms include cards asking you to consider if you REALLY need clean sheets every day (this is very common in the keys)
I was so severely trained as a child that I am now unable to uncap the toothpaste if the water is still running once the brush is wetted.
And, of course, rain barrels - for when it does rain
Too bad we can't make golf courses out of recycled tires - they do it for playgrounds.
 
2014-02-01 07:56:15 AM

parasol: make me some tea: knbwhite: I can't find it, but a local columnist got a quote from a higher up in the Southern Nevada Water Administration who said if we stopped watering every single yard in the vegas valley it wouldn't make a damn bit of difference.

Every little bit helps.

This
I've watched home water use restrictions (water lawns on certain days, etc) go from seasonal to all year long. Restaurants will give you water only if asked. Hotel rooms include cards asking you to consider if you REALLY need clean sheets every day (this is very common in the keys)
I was so severely trained as a child that I am now unable to uncap the toothpaste if the water is still running once the brush is wetted.
And, of course, rain barrels - for when it does rain
Too bad we can't make golf courses out of recycled tires - they do it for playgrounds.


Too bad golfers are rich. If we could tell golfers to fark off, like poor kids, they'd invent water free ways to play, like poor kids.

Then golf would be fun.
 
2014-02-01 08:06:50 AM

doglover: parasol: make me some tea: knbwhite: I can't find it, but a local columnist got a quote from a higher up in the Southern Nevada Water Administration who said if we stopped watering every single yard in the vegas valley it wouldn't make a damn bit of difference.

Every little bit helps.

This
I've watched home water use restrictions (water lawns on certain days, etc) go from seasonal to all year long. Restaurants will give you water only if asked. Hotel rooms include cards asking you to consider if you REALLY need clean sheets every day (this is very common in the keys)
I was so severely trained as a child that I am now unable to uncap the toothpaste if the water is still running once the brush is wetted.
And, of course, rain barrels - for when it does rain
Too bad we can't make golf courses out of recycled tires - they do it for playgrounds.

Too bad golfers are rich. If we could tell golfers to fark off, like poor kids, they'd invent water free ways to play, like poor kids.

Then golf would be fun.


Astro-Turf. Astro-turf everywhere!
If it's good enough for tennis...

Also, thankyou Warchild. Very appreciated.
 
2014-02-01 08:08:55 AM

doglover: parasol: make me some tea: knbwhite: I can't find it, but a local columnist got a quote from a higher up in the Southern Nevada Water Administration who said if we stopped watering every single yard in the vegas valley it wouldn't make a damn bit of difference.

Every little bit helps.

This
I've watched home water use restrictions (water lawns on certain days, etc) go from seasonal to all year long. Restaurants will give you water only if asked. Hotel rooms include cards asking you to consider if you REALLY need clean sheets every day (this is very common in the keys)
I was so severely trained as a child that I am now unable to uncap the toothpaste if the water is still running once the brush is wetted.
And, of course, rain barrels - for when it does rain
Too bad we can't make golf courses out of recycled tires - they do it for playgrounds.

Too bad golfers are rich. If we could tell golfers to fark off, like poor kids, they'd invent water free ways to play, like poor kids.

Then golf would be fun.



www.aussiegolfer.net
 
2014-02-01 08:10:22 AM

doglover: parasol: make me some tea: knbwhite: I can't find it, but a local columnist got a quote from a higher up in the Southern Nevada Water Administration who said if we stopped watering every single yard in the vegas valley it wouldn't make a damn bit of difference.

Every little bit helps.

This
I've watched home water use restrictions (water lawns on certain days, etc) go from seasonal to all year long. Restaurants will give you water only if asked. Hotel rooms include cards asking you to consider if you REALLY need clean sheets every day (this is very common in the keys)
I was so severely trained as a child that I am now unable to uncap the toothpaste if the water is still running once the brush is wetted.
And, of course, rain barrels - for when it does rain
Too bad we can't make golf courses out of recycled tires - they do it for playgrounds.

Too bad golfers are rich. If we could tell golfers to fark off, like poor kids, they'd invent water free ways to play, like poor kids.

Then golf would be fun.


Now,now - not all golfers are rich - my spouse putts around at a public course and, well, i've told him to fark off once or twice but not because he is a plaid-pant wearing douche (sterotypes are fun tho)

It would be fun to build a water-free course - no ball-washers - water hazards could be changed to something more creative. Sort of a win/lose though - many courses and graveyards support wildlife (not including muscovy ducks which should be on far more dinner plates)
 
2014-02-01 08:22:14 AM
Meanwhile, in Florida...

signsoflaughter.com

/saw a "caution: road underwater" sign the other day from all the rain we've been getting
 
2014-02-01 08:36:17 AM
Here's the ironic thing... the reason that California's central valley is so good for farming is because it's pretty much a desert, while soil in the rain-soaked jungles of Brazil is absolutely horrible for farming.  Lack of rain results in nutrients building up in the soil over eons.  Near constant rain, however, results in the soil becoming nearly barren and all the nutrients getting concentrated in the tree tops, not in the soil.  The best places to grow crops tend to be the places with the least water (still need soil, so the Sahara is excluded), while the places with the most rain tend to be the crappiest places to grow crops.
 
2014-02-01 08:45:55 AM
It may suck for part of the country, but local farmers will be enjoying a little more money.  Glad we don't get fruit, it will just affect our vegetables.
/I pay attention to where our produce comes from//no happy cows either, I get local dairy.
 
2014-02-01 08:49:34 AM
Greywater systems and cisterns built into all new houses.

If its brown, flush it down, if its yellow, let it mellow.

Rain barrels in every hardware store.

All lawns and golf courses must be xeriscaped, massive surcharge on pools.

That is all.
 
2014-02-01 09:02:18 AM

Oldiron_79: That Guy Jeff: MaudlinMutantMollusk: Maybe the fact that there's no water TO deliver might be a factor


So get rid of that crap. Let water cost what it actually costs, and you don't have to make any rules about water usage. Suddenly lawns are too expensive, people shut off the water the way they shut off lights, and golf courses go out of business. Best of all, if the cost of water goes up, the usage goes down and the water lasts longer. It's freakin' amazing what letting people see the actual cos ...


This is completely true. The best kind of true.

Unfortunately, the political wrangling and butthurt tears from agriculture (the largest user) would make Benghazi look like Monica-gate. Note that tears are too salty for actual water use or this might be a good solution. We would also go back to fighting water wars and digging through water rights granted from Spanish or English monarchs.

On the plus side, if we have a Dust Bowl, maybe the Okies and Arkies would go back where they came from.

/not all opinions expressed are the author's
 
2014-02-01 09:20:03 AM

JonBuck: They can't build this desalination plant fast enough. Won't be running for a couple years.


6 years stuck in the permits dept..

Govt regulation at its finest.
 
2014-02-01 09:20:08 AM
Dear Americans:

Please stop growing fruit in the middle of the f***ing desert and being surprised that it can't happen without massive overhead.

Thanks.
 
2014-02-01 09:25:44 AM

hlehmann: Here's the ironic thing... the reason that California's central valley is so good for farming is because it's pretty much a desert, while soil in the rain-soaked jungles of Brazil is absolutely horrible for farming.  Lack of rain results in nutrients building up in the soil over eons.  Near constant rain, however, results in the soil becoming nearly barren and all the nutrients getting concentrated in the tree tops, not in the soil.  The best places to grow crops tend to be the places with the least water (still need soil, so the Sahara is excluded), while the places with the most rain tend to be the crappiest places to grow crops.


And yet, bananas are grown in rain forest areas and not in the US.  I don't suspect your science is perfect.

/calling other FARKers on this who would like to bring real science
//MI's berry harvest can be affected by not having enough snow during the winter.
///looking to see how well my backyard strawberries and raspberries are going to do this year.
 
2014-02-01 09:26:38 AM
As others have said, this summer and the next couple of years are going to be interesting.

On a side note: Is there any chance that this could be used as an opportunity to do some major work on the Sacramento Valley levee system?
 
2014-02-01 09:30:33 AM

That Guy Jeff: Mister Peejay: Nexzus: As a citizen of the country north of the USA, incidentally containing 20% of the world's fresh water and .5% of the world's population: every time I hear about another water shortage in our neighbours to the south, I get a tiny bit more nervous.

This shiat only seems to be getting worse. People will biatch and moan and make-do over super-expensive or no oil. They may get shooty if you do the same with water.

I find it kinda funny (funny "duh" not funny "ha-ha") when people start mumbling about getting water from the Great Lakes.

Ever look at the Great Lakes watershed?  Most of it is in Canada.  That's Canadian water.

Lucky for us Americans, Canadian water is protected by the Canadian military, and our military is more than capable of handling a bunch of drunken horsemen in red coats.


So you're saying if we dressed the Viet Cong or the Taliban in red...

It might just work
 
2014-02-01 09:32:01 AM

fusillade762: Saw this graph in the paper today:

[planetindistress.files.wordpress.com image 500x147]

CA could be in for another hundred years of this.


NO NO NO it's not cyclical..it's global warming of climate change!
 
2014-02-01 09:35:55 AM
It's all those illegal aliens. Every week they mail home envelopes of our precious water back to where they came from.

Trust me
 
2014-02-01 09:42:18 AM

tinfoil-hat maggie: gingerjet: FTFA where much of the nation's food is grown

Iowa, Nebraska, and Minnesota would like a word with you.

Well they grow the Tomato's you get mid winter etc. Sure the Midwest grows grains but a good bit of that is getting shifted to fuel production to my understanding


Once again, govt controls..
 
2014-02-01 10:30:22 AM

TenJed_77: Mister Peejay: Nexzus: As a citizen of the country north of the USA, incidentally containing 20% of the world's fresh water and .5% of the world's population: every time I hear about another water shortage in our neighbours to the south, I get a tiny bit more nervous.

This shiat only seems to be getting worse. People will biatch and moan and make-do over super-expensive or no oil. They may get shooty if you do the same with water.

I find it kinda funny (funny "duh" not funny "ha-ha") when people start mumbling about getting water from the Great Lakes.

Ever look at the Great Lakes watershed?  Most of it is in Canada.  That's Canadian water.

No most of it is in the states.

[www.epa.gov image 850x748]


And the US already drains every bit it's allowed to by treaty, so Chicago can flush its shiat down the Des Plaines/Kankakee/Illinois Rivers and ruin the Great Lakes fisheries by giving invasive species an easy way to get from the Mississippi to the lakes (but hey, barge traffic!).
 
2014-02-01 10:39:28 AM

WayToBlue: fark almonds and walnuts, avocados are what matters.


Won't someone save the cannibal women in the avocado jungle of death!
 
2014-02-01 11:04:07 AM
Thanks to the liberals who have been preventing reservoir construction.
 
2014-02-01 11:06:40 AM

Gyrfalcon: I wonder how much water would be saved if we banned lawns--and ONLY lawns--in So Cal. I bet it would be a lot.


I bet it wouldn't.  If only there were some way to find out.  Oh yeah, the Googles.

UCLA Institute of Environment and Sustainability:


www.environment.ucla.edu

Urban residential exterior (multi family and single family combined): 6%
Large Landscape 1%
Total: 7% (only a portion of which goes to grass.)

Yeah!  Get rid of those lawns!!!!!  I'm waaaaahhhrrrrrggarrbbllllle!
 
2014-02-01 11:08:15 AM
I grew up near Folsom Lake and used to spend every other day at Beals Point and Granite Beach as a kid. I thought it was bad in the late 80's and early 90's when we had to walk 1/4 mile to get to the water. Now, just uff.

/miss that area a lot
 
2014-02-01 11:24:20 AM
Let them eat cake.
 
2014-02-01 11:38:02 AM

Louisiana_Sitar_Club: Gyrfalcon: I wonder how much water would be saved if we banned lawns--and ONLY lawns--in So Cal. I bet it would be a lot.

I bet it wouldn't.  If only there were some way to find out.  Oh yeah, the Googles.

UCLA Institute of Environment and Sustainability:


[www.environment.ucla.edu image 500x335]

Urban residential exterior (multi family and single family combined): 6%
Large Landscape 1%
Total: 7% (only a portion of which goes to grass.)

Yeah!  Get rid of those lawns!!!!!  I'm waaaaahhhrrrrrggarrbbllllle!


You have some sort of agenda going on here?  Gyrfalcon specifically mentions lawns in SoCal, so you go ahead and post a graph of the entire state of California when  right below the same graph you posted from the same link is a graph of lawns in SoCal.

Here... let me re-Google that for you:

www.environment.ucla.edu

Yeah!  Cherry-pick charted information to create a misleading presentation!!!!!  I'm waaaaahhhrrrrrggarrbbllllle!
 
2014-02-01 12:18:30 PM
Michigan: We'll die of poverty induced starvation before we die of thirst. Suck it, CA.
 
2014-02-01 12:20:25 PM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: Mark Ratner: some_beer_drinker: Mark Ratner: They should start installing these everywhere.
Obscure?

[static4.wikia.nocookie.net image 700x994]

very obscure, obviously. what on earth is that thing?

It's an image from the movie Star Wars. Spock's uncle was a moisture farmer.
/live long and prosper

Ah... Nanu Nanu, Pilgrim


He's full of it. It wasn't Spock's uncle, that's ridiculous. Spock would never wear that hair style.

It was Kirk while he was a gangly whiny teenager always looking for power converters. You know that scene in the first Star Trek movie, the movie that introduces the franchise with the time traveling Klingots, where Kirk is driving the car as a kid? Well his mom got sick of him after that and sent him to live in the arid fields of Iowa on Tattooine. It was John D Kirk's uncle that was the moisture farmer.

Shame about that business with the Starfleet Empire SWAT team killing them all. No knock warrant I guess.
 
2014-02-01 12:46:30 PM

Mister Peejay: Nexzus: As a citizen of the country north of the USA, incidentally containing 20% of the world's fresh water and .5% of the world's population: every time I hear about another water shortage in our neighbours to the south, I get a tiny bit more nervous.

This shiat only seems to be getting worse. People will biatch and moan and make-do over super-expensive or no oil. They may get shooty if you do the same with water.

I find it kinda funny (funny "duh" not funny "ha-ha") when people start mumbling about getting water from the Great Lakes.

Ever look at the Great Lakes watershed?  Most of it is in Canada.  That's Canadian water.


We can just take the water from the U.S. part. ;-)
 
2014-02-01 12:47:45 PM

ElLoco: Louisiana_Sitar_Club: Gyrfalcon: I wonder how much water would be saved if we banned lawns--and ONLY lawns--in So Cal. I bet it would be a lot.

I bet it wouldn't.  If only there were some way to find out.  Oh yeah, the Googles.

UCLA Institute of Environment and Sustainability:


[www.environment.ucla.edu image 500x335]

Urban residential exterior (multi family and single family combined): 6%
Large Landscape 1%
Total: 7% (only a portion of which goes to grass.)

Yeah!  Get rid of those lawns!!!!!  I'm waaaaahhhrrrrrggarrbbllllle!

You have some sort of agenda going on here?  Gyrfalcon specifically mentions lawns in SoCal, so you go ahead and post a graph of the entire state of California when  right below the same graph you posted from the same link is a graph of lawns in SoCal.

Here... let me re-Google that for you:



Yeah!  Cherry-pick charted information to create a misleading presentation!!!!!  I'm waaaaahhhrrrrrggarrbbllllle!


I can't read that graph very well now that I'm on mobile but the issue at hand here is not enough water for agriculture in the state of California. You can either get your knickers in a twist over a small fraction of the state and come up with a local solution that does precisely jack shiat to address the problem or you can look at water availability on a scale that is germane to the discussion at hand. I chose to look at the data that speaks best to water allocation as it relates to California agriculture. You do whatever the fark you want.
 
2014-02-01 01:15:31 PM

Charlie Crews' Zen Master: MaudlinMutantMollusk: Mark Ratner: some_beer_drinker: Mark Ratner: They should start installing these everywhere.
Obscure?

[static4.wikia.nocookie.net image 700x994]

very obscure, obviously. what on earth is that thing?

It's an image from the movie Star Wars. Spock's uncle was a moisture farmer.
/live long and prosper

Ah... Nanu Nanu, Pilgrim

He's full of it. It wasn't Spock's uncle, that's ridiculous. Spock would never wear that hair style.

It was Kirk while he was a gangly whiny teenager always looking for power converters. You know that scene in the first Star Trek movie, the movie that introduces the franchise with the time traveling Klingots, where Kirk is driving the car as a kid? Well his mom got sick of him after that and sent him to live in the arid fields of Iowa on Tattooine. It was John D Kirk's uncle that was the moisture farmer.

Shame about that business with the Starfleet Empire SWAT team killing them all. No knock warrant I guess.


WRONG!
You're mistaking it with this movie.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_oMtTPxqJRI
 
2014-02-01 01:23:17 PM

stirfrybry: http://sunshinehours.wordpress.com/2014/01/19/drought-in-california-c o ol-pdo-and-warm-amo/

When the PDO is cool (which it is) and the AMO is warm (which it is) drought in California is going to happen.


Pop quiz: What are PDO and AMO?  (your blog sucks and the links are fake)
 
2014-02-01 01:28:16 PM

parasol: Hotel rooms include cards asking you to consider if you REALLY need clean sheets every day (this is very common in the keys)


Maybe this started in portions of the country with more drought problems, but from what I can tell this is quite common everywhere currently. Well, not that I can really say "everywhere", but at least in the corridor between Chicago-area and the north east.
 
2014-02-01 01:28:26 PM

Ronin_S: Greywater systems and cisterns built into all new houses.

If its brown, flush it down, if its yellow, let it mellow.

Rain barrels in every hardware store.

All lawns and golf courses must be xeriscaped, massive surcharge on pools.

That is all.


Rain Barrels (or other water retention devices) are illegal in many states. They don't want you storing water for your OWN use, they want the water that falls on YOUR property to be used by *everybody*.
 
2014-02-01 01:33:07 PM
2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2014-02-01 01:36:04 PM

GrailOfThunder: Ronin_S: Greywater systems and cisterns built into all new houses.

If its brown, flush it down, if its yellow, let it mellow.

Rain barrels in every hardware store.

All lawns and golf courses must be xeriscaped, massive surcharge on pools.

That is all.

Rain Barrels (or other water retention devices) are illegal in many states. They don't want you storing water for your OWN use, they want the water that falls on YOUR property to be used by *everybody*.


I got around questions regarding my rain barrel by strategic placement of a plant that looks suspiciously like marijuana.
 
2014-02-01 01:55:43 PM

OnlyM3: Thanks to the liberals who have been preventing reservoir construction.


Reservoirs aren't going to do jack if there's no water to put in them.
 
2014-02-01 01:58:38 PM

GrailOfThunder: Ronin_S: Greywater systems and cisterns built into all new houses.

If its brown, flush it down, if its yellow, let it mellow.

Rain barrels in every hardware store.

All lawns and golf courses must be xeriscaped, massive surcharge on pools.

That is all.

Rain Barrels (or other water retention devices) are illegal in many states. They don't want you storing water for your OWN use, they want the water that falls on YOUR property to be used by *everybody*.


This is true in Oregon as well, and we don't have drought very often.

People storing rainwater farks up the entire watershed.
Of course, that doesn't stop a single person I know from doing it anyway.
 
2014-02-01 02:01:24 PM

Lee Jackson Beauregard: OnlyM3: Thanks to the liberals who have been preventing reservoir construction.

Reservoirs aren't going to do jack if there's no water to put in them.


California has plenty of reservoirs.
 
2014-02-01 02:10:25 PM
Just have to get my Orange juice from Florida then.
 
2014-02-01 02:17:22 PM

Gyrfalcon: Yeah, blame it on the farmers. It's all their fault that everyone wanted to eat food on the cheap, just like it's the miners in Appalachia's fault everyone wanted power on the cheap.


You're an intelligent person. Go look up who owns most of the agricultural land in California. You'll find that it's the oil companies and the railroads that were given vast swathes of land years ago. Most of that land is not used to produce food; instead they grow cotton in the goddamned desert! California is the number one cotton producing state in the union. Using flood irrigation on a giant sponge, while paying pennies on the dollar for water bought by the acre/foot. Urban usage of water only accounts for 15% of Southern California's total usage. You know who I blame? The government/Big Business crony system. The people in office who enabled these vampire corporations to use up the citizens' resources.
 
2014-02-01 02:21:24 PM

lucksi: Gyrfalcon: Ha ha.

I'm anxiously awaiting when we get our 50-gal/day mandatory water rationing. We did that during the last really bad drought in 1976ish, IIRC. That was fun. Not. No flush-ie toilet, bathing every other day, no watering lawns...good times. Cannot WAIT for the screaming from the HOAs, though! Watching golf courses get brown & crunchy in the searing So Cal sun...
50  gallons a DAY is rationing to you? What the fark is wrong with you?

A toilet uses 1,5 gallons nowadays or half that with the little flush button.



According to the EPA, the average family of four goes through about 400 gallons per day.
 
2014-02-01 02:27:43 PM

Ronin_S: Rain barrels in every hardware store.



Several western states have some strict rules concerning rainwater collection.
 
2014-02-01 03:00:50 PM

make me some tea: Lee Jackson Beauregard: OnlyM3: Thanks to the liberals who have been preventing reservoir construction.

Reservoirs aren't going to do jack if there's no water to put in them.

California has plenty of reservoirs.


Apparently not.  If they had plenty, they wouldn't be out of water would they?
 
2014-02-01 03:37:36 PM

Mr. Eugenides: make me some tea: Lee Jackson Beauregard: OnlyM3: Thanks to the liberals who have been preventing reservoir construction.

Reservoirs aren't going to do jack if there's no water to put in them.

California has plenty of reservoirs.

Apparently not.  If they had plenty, they wouldn't be out of water would they?


That's not accurate.  They do in fact have plenty of reservoirs.  They just lack any water to put in them.
 
gja [TotalFark]
2014-02-01 04:50:43 PM

Mister Peejay: Nexzus: As a citizen of the country north of the USA, incidentally containing 20% of the world's fresh water and .5% of the world's population: every time I hear about another water shortage in our neighbours to the south, I get a tiny bit more nervous.

This shiat only seems to be getting worse. People will biatch and moan and make-do over super-expensive or no oil. They may get shooty if you do the same with water.

I find it kinda funny (funny "duh" not funny "ha-ha") when people start mumbling about getting water from the Great Lakes.

Ever look at the Great Lakes watershed?  Most of it is in Canada.  That's Canadian water.


Then make sure it stays on your side. Otherwise, what makes its way over is in dispute.

/see how silly that sounds?
//because it is
 
2014-02-01 06:22:53 PM

give me doughnuts: Ronin_S: Rain barrels in every hardware store.


Several western states have some strict rules concerning rainwater collection.


I didn't realize that. They're begging people to collect their rainwater and have permeable driveways in Ontario because there are so many paved surfaces in the city that a major rain has a good chance of causing a flood.
 
2014-02-01 07:00:10 PM

Kahabut: Mr. Eugenides: make me some tea: Lee Jackson Beauregard: OnlyM3: Thanks to the liberals who have been preventing reservoir construction.

Reservoirs aren't going to do jack if there's no water to put in them.

California has plenty of reservoirs.

Apparently not.  If they had plenty, they wouldn't be out of water would they?

That's not accurate.  They do in fact have plenty of reservoirs.  They just lack any water to put in them.


Reservoir - water = Depression :)
 
2014-02-01 07:26:32 PM

CourtroomWolf: stirfrybry: http://sunshinehours.wordpress.com/2014/01/19/drought-in-california-c o ol-pdo-and-warm-amo/

When the PDO is cool (which it is) and the AMO is warm (which it is) drought in California is going to happen.

Pop quiz: What are PDO and AMO?  (your blog sucks and the links are fake)


LOL you are retarded.
Go to NOAA if you really don't know what they are
 
2014-02-01 09:29:01 PM

UNAUTHORIZED FINGER: Kahabut: Mr. Eugenides: make me some tea: Lee Jackson Beauregard: OnlyM3: Thanks to the liberals who have been preventing reservoir construction.

Reservoirs aren't going to do jack if there's no water to put in them.

California has plenty of reservoirs.

Apparently not.  If they had plenty, they wouldn't be out of water would they?

That's not accurate.  They do in fact have plenty of reservoirs.  They just lack any water to put in them.

Reservoir - water = Depression :)



This concludes another episode of Algonquin Farking Round Table.
 
2014-02-01 09:43:19 PM

That Guy Jeff: MaudlinMutantMollusk: Maybe the fact that there's no water TO deliver might be a factor

/reservoirs ain't lookin' too good around here
//and damn little snow up top
///this is gonna suck hard come Summer

You live in California; be honest, it sucks in Spring, Fall, and Winter too.

Gyrfalcon:
I wonder how much water would be saved if we banned lawns--and ONLY lawns--in So Cal. I bet it would be a lot.

The answer: more than enough. It's farking stupid that people have lawns in deserts. And golf courses, being giant lawns, are the worst. They have both of them out here in Arizona too, which is extra stupid.

I've got a better solution though, that won't end up with  SWAT teams being used for code enforcement required. Simply stop subsidizing the cost of water. You see, I don't conserve water at all. I leave the sink running while I brush my teeth, I run the dishwasher as many times I need to, I take long showers. And the water usage part of my bill every month is $2. Literally $2. I could use ten times as much water as I do every month and the bill would still be negligible. There's absolutely no incentive to save water.

Now, I live in a freakin desert. There's no way the water I use actually costs $2. Somewhere along the line some asshat in the government decided to encourage growth or "help" the poor or more likely just wanted to play golf, and now water usage isn't remotely related to water costs. There's no reason not to use as much as you want, and all us jerks can have lawns and long showers and golf courses right up until nothing comes out of the tap.

So get rid of that crap. Let water cost what it actually costs, and you don't have to make any rules about water usage. Suddenly lawns are too expensive, people shut off the water the way they shut off lights, and golf courses go out of business. Best of all, if the cost of water goes up, the usage goes down and the water lasts longer. It's freakin' amazing what letting people see the actual cost of their stuf ...


Amen.  Could not be more right.  Don't subsidize anybody.  Not industry, farmers, golf courses, none of it.
 
2014-02-01 10:00:11 PM

Monkeyfark Ridiculous: UNAUTHORIZED FINGER: Kahabut: Mr. Eugenides: make me some tea: Lee Jackson Beauregard: OnlyM3: Thanks to the liberals who have been preventing reservoir construction.

Reservoirs aren't going to do jack if there's no water to put in them.

California has plenty of reservoirs.

Apparently not.  If they had plenty, they wouldn't be out of water would they?

That's not accurate.  They do in fact have plenty of reservoirs.  They just lack any water to put in them.

Reservoir - water = Depression :)


This concludes another episode of Algonquin Farking Round Table.


Tune in next week to hear Dorothy Parker say, "You can lead a whore to culture, but you can't make her think."
 
2014-02-01 10:23:26 PM
Oil or water?
 
2014-02-01 11:01:36 PM
putting farms in deserts was never very smart
 
2014-02-02 12:21:53 AM

Louisiana_Sitar_Club: ElLoco: Louisiana_Sitar_Club: Gyrfalcon: I wonder how much water would be saved if we banned lawns--and ONLY lawns--in So Cal. I bet it would be a lot.

I bet it wouldn't.  If only there were some way to find out.  Oh yeah, the Googles.

UCLA Institute of Environment and Sustainability:


[www.environment.ucla.edu image 500x335]

Urban residential exterior (multi family and single family combined): 6%
Large Landscape 1%
Total: 7% (only a portion of which goes to grass.)

Yeah!  Get rid of those lawns!!!!!  I'm waaaaahhhrrrrrggarrbbllllle!

You have some sort of agenda going on here?  Gyrfalcon specifically mentions lawns in SoCal, so you go ahead and post a graph of the entire state of California when  right below the same graph you posted from the same link is a graph of lawns in SoCal.

Here... let me re-Google that for you:

Yeah!  Cherry-pick charted information to create a misleading presentation!!!!!  I'm waaaaahhhrrrrrggarrbbllllle!

I can't read that graph very well now that I'm on mobile but the issue at hand here is not enough water for agriculture in the state of California. You can either get your knickers in a twist over a small fraction of the state and come up with a local solution that does precisely jack shiat to address the problem or you can look at water availability on a scale that is germane to the discussion at hand. I chose to look at the data that speaks best to water allocation as it relates to California agriculture. You do whatever the fark you want.


Yes, the vast majority of the state's water is used for agriculture, but most of us can't do a whole lot about that.  Sure, we can push for laws that would require agribusiness to use water more wisely, but those sorts of changes usually take years.  Meanwhile, anyone who lives in California can reduce their own water usage wherever possible (replace lawns with xeriscaping, turn off the faucet when brushing teeth, etc.), and make a small but nonzero difference.
 
2014-02-02 12:38:27 AM

anfrind: Yes, the vast majority of the state's water is used for agriculture, but most of us can't do a whole lot about that. Sure, we can push for laws that would require agribusiness to use water more wisely, but those sorts of changes usually take years


I can remember our lawmakers pushing for better water practices for agribusiness in 1977, when I was a sophomore in high school. Instead we got the first attempt to force the Peripheral Canal down our throats. Pass the damned laws already, and MAKE the farkers obey. This shiat is old.
 
2014-02-02 01:46:58 AM
Interesting statement from the NWS:

...A PLETHORA OF RECORDS SET IN SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA THROUGHOUT JANUARY 2014 DURING THIS HISTORIC DROUGHT...
JANUARY 2014 RE-WROTE THE RECORD BOOKS IN SACRAMENTO. HERE ARE THE HIGHLIGHTS, MANY RECORDS NEVER SEEN BEFORE IN THE CAPITAL CITY.
1. LONGEST DRY PERIOD DURING THE RAINY SEASON (NOV-MAR) FROM DEC 7, 2013 TO JAN 29, 2014, 52 DAYS. THE OLD RECORD WAS 44 DAYS FROM NOV 15, 1976 TO DEC 28, 1976 ( MEASURABLE RAIN)
2. THE THIRD DRIEST JAN IN HISTORY SINCE 1850 WITH 0.20 INCHES DATING BACK TO SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION RECORDS.
3. JAN PRECIPITATION ENDED WITH 0.20 INCHES. NORMAL IS 3.97 INCHES. THIS IS ONLY 5 PERCENT OF NORMAL.
4. JAN 2014 BROKE HIGHEST AVERAGE MAXIMUM TEMPERATURE WITH 66.1 DEGREES. THE OLD RECORD WAS 62.1 DEGREES SET IN 1976. AVERAGE MONTHLY MAXIMUM ONLY 55.1 DEGREES.
5. NEW ALL-TIME RECORD HIGH FOR THE MONTH OF JAN SET ON JAN 24, 2014 OF 79 DEGREES. THE OLD RECORD WAS 74 DEGREES ON JAN 31,1976.
6. JAN 2014 BROKE THE NUMBER OF DAYS WITH HIGH TEMPERATURES OF 70 DEGREES OR HIGHER AT 7 DAYS. THE PREVIOUS RECORD WAS 6 DAYS SET IN 1976.
7. TIED THE RECORD FOR CONSECUTIVE DAYS OF HIGH TEMPERATURES AT 70 DEGREES OR HIGHER WITH 3 DAYS IN JAN FROM JAN 23, 2014 TO JAN 25 2014. PREVIOUS RECORD WAS JAN 29, 1976 TO JAN 31, 1976.
8. RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURES SET ON 12 DIFFERENT DAYS IN JAN 2014
JAN 1....65 DEGREES....TIED RECORD SET IN 1887. JAN 2....66 DEGREES....BREAKS RECORD OF 65 SET IN 1940. JAN 3....66 DEGREES....BREAKS RECORD OF 64 SET IN 2012. JAN 7....65 DEGREES....TIED RECORD SET IN 2012. JAN 15...69 DEGREES....BREAKS RECORD OF 68 SET IN 2003. JAN 16...71 DEGREES....BREAKS RECORD OF 68 SET IN 1991. JAN 18...70 DEGREES....TIED RECORD SET IN 1976. JAN 20...71 DEGREES....BREAKS RECORD OF 69 SET IN 1976. JAN 23...71 DEGREES....BREAKS RECORD OF 69 SET IN 1948. JAN 24...79 DEGREES....BREAKS RECORD OF 7O SET IN 1984.(ALL-TIME)JAN JAN 25...74 DEGREES....BREAKS RECORD OF 71 SET IN 1899. JAN 28...70 DEGREES....TIED RECORD SET IN 1984.
9. EVERYDAY IN JAN 2014 THE DAYTIME HIGH TEMPERATURE WAS ABOVE NORMAL FOR THE MONTH, NORMAL HIGH RANGE IS 53 TO 57 DEGREES. JAN 2014 WAS 57 TO 79 DEGREES.
10. FINALLY, WE ARE HOPING FOR A FABULOUS FEB 2014. ALL-TIME RECORD FOR RAIN IN FEB IS 10.30 INCHES SET IN 1986.
HAVE A NICE WEEKEND!
SPECIAL NOTE: SACRAMENTO STATICAL DATA WAS USED DUE TO ITS LENGTHY HISTORY FOR RECORDS DATING BACK TO 1849 FOR PRECIPITATION AND 1877 FOR TEMPERATURES. SEVERAL OTHER LOCATIONS THROUGHOUT INTERIOR NORTHERN CALIFORNIA DID BREAK RECORDS, BUT DUE TO THE DETAILED DATA BASE FOR SACRAMENTO DETAILED INFORMATION WAS VERIFIED.
 
jvl
2014-02-02 01:48:57 AM

ElLoco: Yeah!  Cherry-pick charted information to create a misleading presentation!!!!!  I'm waaaaahhhrrrrrggarrbbllllle!


So you're saying if you ignore the farms and look at what water is used inside a city, very little of it is agriculture? Please tell me more!
 
2014-02-02 02:42:22 AM

make me some tea: Yeah, shiat's getting real here. This is Folsom Lake, which is a major part of the water supply for the Sacramento area. I took this pic a couple weekends ago.


Damn! I was there in September and it looked a little low but was still a lake! It emptied completely since then?! I'm in SF now and getting a little worried.
 
2014-02-02 02:58:46 AM

jvl: ElLoco: Yeah!  Cherry-pick charted information to create a misleading presentation!!!!!  I'm waaaaahhhrrrrrggarrbbllllle!

So you're saying if you ignore the farms and look at what water is used inside a city, very little of it is agriculture? Please tell me more!


Ok... ask yourself: Do I want grains and veggies for lunch for as long as possible, or should I come up with some good recipes for Kentucky bluegrass?"

It's your choice. Do what you want.
 
2014-02-02 08:53:41 AM

ElLoco: jvl: ElLoco: Yeah!  Cherry-pick charted information to create a misleading presentation!!!!!  I'm waaaaahhhrrrrrggarrbbllllle!

So you're saying if you ignore the farms and look at what water is used inside a city, very little of it is agriculture? Please tell me more!

Ok... ask yourself: Do I want grains and veggies for lunch for as long as possible, or should I come up with some good recipes for Kentucky bluegrass?"

It's your choice. Do what you want.


The point is that you can save water locally but it will have little to no effect on agriculture.  Saving water on the small scale is a good thing, sure.  But, as anfrind correctly point out above, getting rid of lawns will have little to know effect on agriculture.  Getting rid of lawns is not at all unreasonable in our situation.  But, it won't have a significant effect on agriculture.  Arguing to get rid of lawns to because it will have any real affect on agriculture makes you sound like your are utterly incapable of grasping the concept of scale.  Hell, maybe you are incapable, I don't know.
 
2014-02-02 09:47:17 AM
en.es-static.us

Flood Irrigation. This is how most of California's crops are watered.

en.es-static.us

Drip Irrigation. This is how California's crops should be watered. No evaporation, no over-watering, much less weeding, and a water-savings of 15-55%, with a crop gain of 18-50%. Citation (warning: PDF).
 
2014-02-02 10:17:59 AM

UNAUTHORIZED FINGER: anfrind: Yes, the vast majority of the state's water is used for agriculture, but most of us can't do a whole lot about that. Sure, we can push for laws that would require agribusiness to use water more wisely, but those sorts of changes usually take years

I can remember our lawmakers pushing for better water practices for agribusiness in 1977, when I was a sophomore in high school. Instead we got the first attempt to force the Peripheral Canal down our throats. Pass the damned laws already, and MAKE the farkers obey. This shiat is old.


Considering that one of the things that sank Jimmy Carter's presidency was that he told American to turn down the thermostat and put on a sweater, it doesn't come as a surprise to me that it could take 36+ years for the laws to catch up with the times.
 
2014-02-02 10:18:45 AM

anfrind: Considering that one of the things that sank Jimmy Carter's presidency was that he told America to turn down the thermostat and put on a sweater, it doesn't come as a surprise to me that it could take 36+ years for the laws to catch up with the times.


FTFM
 
2014-02-02 10:38:40 AM

anfrind: UNAUTHORIZED FINGER: anfrind: Yes, the vast majority of the state's water is used for agriculture, but most of us can't do a whole lot about that. Sure, we can push for laws that would require agribusiness to use water more wisely, but those sorts of changes usually take years

I can remember our lawmakers pushing for better water practices for agribusiness in 1977, when I was a sophomore in high school. Instead we got the first attempt to force the Peripheral Canal down our throats. Pass the damned laws already, and MAKE the farkers obey. This shiat is old.

Considering that one of the things that sank Jimmy Carter's presidency was that he told American to turn down the thermostat and put on a sweater, it doesn't come as a surprise to me that it could take 36+ years for the laws to catch up with the times.


Good point. He's looking smarter and smarter every day. I still regret that I wasted my first voting opportunity on John Anderson.
 
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