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(Washington Times)   The latest ObamaCare scandal: regulating pizzas. THIS. IS. AN. OUTRAGE   (washingtontimes.com) divider line 52
    More: Stupid, obamacare, Cathy McMorris, Roy Blunt, Food Marketing Institute, medical sign, Loretta Sanchez, State of the Union  
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9539 clicks; posted to Main » on 31 Jan 2014 at 4:31 PM (47 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

2014-01-31 04:51:17 PM  
9 votes:
Why do people continue to buy into BS like this?  Of course the people who will have to pay for this (corporations) want customers to believe it will raise prices - but the world just doesn't work that way.

If Papa John's could get more money for there crappy pizza then they are already charging, wouldn't they already be doing that??

Price is not Cost plus Desired Profit.  Price is what the market will bear, and Profit is Price minus Cost.

Don't be dumb.
2014-01-31 04:09:27 PM  
6 votes:

creating a nutritional menu for the hundreds of possible food combinations


or, you could do this:



www.anutinanutshell.com
2014-01-31 04:52:54 PM  
3 votes:
If these bastards had their way, they'd still be blocking the 1970s laws that mandated nutritional information on packaged supermarket food.
2014-01-31 04:42:08 PM  
3 votes:

ShadowKamui: Ritley: What an asinine argument. The cost of a board showing nutrition info is not burdensome in any manner

You do realize it costs $$$ to do the nutrition tests


Isn't the info on the Sysco containers?
2014-01-31 04:42:08 PM  
3 votes:

Ritley: What an asinine argument. The cost of a board showing nutrition info is not burdensome in any manner


How bout the cost of producing that data?    Having somebody determine the calorie counts for an entire menu.  Think that's free?
2014-01-31 04:00:19 PM  
3 votes:
requires restaurants with 20 or more locations to list calorie-content information for each menu item on a board at every establishment.  The costs of this intrusive regulation would be passed on to consumers in the form of higher prices


The costs
of  a board

THE COSTS of A BOARD
2014-01-31 05:51:20 PM  
2 votes:
The reason for the pushback is that restaurants DO NOT want the customer to know what they are eating, because they actually might not eat it.
2014-01-31 05:28:57 PM  
2 votes:
To the people biatching about the costs of coming up with the calorie counts... I'm just one guy, and if I want to know how many calories are in a homemade meal, here's what I do: I weigh the amount of ingredient I'll be using to make the meal, I check the ingredient label to see how many calories are in a serving, I do a little math, I write down the total, and I repeat that for every ingredient. Maybe that takes five minutes. What exactly is so hard about this? They don't have to send each menu item to a frickin' lab. We already know the calorie content of stuff. What, they can do all the calculations required to determine how much they should mark up their food, but they can't be bothered to do the calculations to determine how fat their food will make us?
2014-01-31 04:49:42 PM  
2 votes:
Why don't they just release a chart we can all understand.

On a standard Large Pizza (16")

1-2 Slices: Normal
3-4 Slices: That uncomfortable feeling is telling you something.
4+ Slices: Good job fatty
2014-01-31 04:49:01 PM  
2 votes:
To be honest - if you think anything at these restaurants is good for you you probably deserve to be fat with diabetes.

If you are a smart restaurant (that is healthy) you do this without being asked.

Side note: Chipotle (I love you)
2014-01-31 04:46:23 PM  
2 votes:
Wait. Did the real math.

The Restaurant industry is $683 billion/year. If this will cost the restaurant industry $1 billion as a whole, expect a 0.14 cents/dollar increase on your meal.

This truly is going to ruin the industry.
2014-01-31 04:44:23 PM  
2 votes:

ShadowKamui: Ritley: What an asinine argument. The cost of a board showing nutrition info is not burdensome in any manner

You do realize it costs $$$ to do the nutrition tests


If you have 20 or more locations, you have a set of standards for each dish.  The on-site cooks don't get to buy their own random supplies from wherever and wing their own dishes.  You know what the caloric content of your ingredients are and you know what your recipes are.
2014-01-31 04:41:50 PM  
2 votes:
This again?  Why do they trot the same complaints out year after   year after year as though  these are new "surprising" parts of the law?
2014-01-31 04:38:51 PM  
2 votes:

Ritley: What an asinine argument. The cost of a board showing nutrition info is not burdensome in any manner


You do realize it costs $$$ to do the nutrition tests
2014-01-31 04:38:40 PM  
2 votes:
What a stupid argu.... Oh, it's the Moonie Times.  Carry on.
vpb [TotalFark]
2014-01-31 04:34:30 PM  
2 votes:
That's nonsense.  Stores already spend plenty on  promotional signage.  They could simply combine the two and it would cost nothing extra.
2014-02-01 01:12:49 PM  
1 votes:

hasty ambush: If you need the nutritional /caloric info on a pizza/fast food I would l suggest that maybe you should not really be eating one.


Because  healthy people never eaten something bad for them and there is no need to have the information to see what a reasonable amount to consume is or how it affects the rest of their diet.

The whole "if you eat fast food you are a stupid fatty and don't care" is BS.
2014-02-01 01:04:34 PM  
1 votes:

sufferpuppet: Ritley: What an asinine argument. The cost of a board showing nutrition info is not burdensome in any manner

How bout the cost of producing that data?    Having somebody determine the calorie counts for an entire menu.  Think that's free?


If you don't already know this stuff about your business, your restaurant that you use to serve this food that you purchase, then you deserve to go out of business.
2014-01-31 06:15:54 PM  
1 votes:

Nabb1: 12349876: Nabb1: For example, restaurants that primarily deal with delivery. Customers would never see it.

Every delivery place I know of also does take out.  Little Caesars promotes their 5 buck hot n ready pizzas for carryout with tons of tv commercials recently.

Little Greasers doesn't deliver. And delivery customers still wouldn't see the board. I've never set foot in the Papa John's I've been ordering from for 15 years.


The point is if you have customers in your store even if it's just take out then it's only fair that you need a damn board.
2014-01-31 05:52:04 PM  
1 votes:
It's amazing how many people will pretend to have never seen a menu with a calorie count on it, all while attempting to convey that they understand how business works.
2014-01-31 05:46:36 PM  
1 votes:

I alone am best: IAmRight: sdd2000: I alone am best: When you change it you have to have the lab tell you how many calories are in your new menu item

I was responding to this in your post and the answer is no you can use any of these--including nutrient databases, cookbooks, laboratory analyses, and other reasonable means

But you guys, it's really expensive to google up nutrition facts for ingredients and know how much I use for each product I make! It could take a second-grader nearly hours to add up the numbers!

nutrient databases, cookbooks, laboratory analyses, and other reasonable means

Not

google and guesswork


Describe  one ingredient not listed in the USDA's official reference, available online, free.
2014-01-31 05:41:24 PM  
1 votes:
They've had that on the books for years in NY... It's pretty helpful to know that the meal you're ordering is about 1,000 more calories than you'd thought it was.
2014-01-31 05:40:11 PM  
1 votes:
California already does this, and as far as I can tell fast food restaurants are doing just fine.
2014-01-31 05:39:45 PM  
1 votes:

cman: Cagey B: cman: Cagey B: cman: I see it as a BS argument, but to be fair, you would be surprised how much something like this could cost

Try me. Whatever it is I'm sure will bankrupt utterly a business with at least twenty operating restaurants.

Try you? I already said it was a BS argument

The statement that we'd be "surprised how much something like this could cost" implies that doing this is a) relatively expensive and b) some sort of noticeable burden to the parties that would have to comply. If that's genuinely not what you were driving at, then whatever.

Thats why I added "to be fair"


Your mom is a whore.  No disrespect.

I added "no disrespect."
2014-01-31 05:39:19 PM  
1 votes:

doctor wu: I always enjoy reading the delusional right wing butt-hurt in the comments below such articles.


Aren't they amazing?
2014-01-31 05:38:50 PM  
1 votes:

IAmRight: sdd2000: I alone am best: When you change it you have to have the lab tell you how many calories are in your new menu item

I was responding to this in your post and the answer is no you can use any of these--including nutrient databases, cookbooks, laboratory analyses, and other reasonable means

But you guys, it's really expensive to google up nutrition facts for ingredients and know how much I use for each product I make! It could take a second-grader nearly hours to add up the numbers!


Basic math is not reasonable means to a derper!
2014-01-31 05:33:36 PM  
1 votes:

boyvoyeur: m1ke: The whole point of this country is if you want to eat garbage, balloon up to 600 pounds, and die of a heart attack at 43, you can. You are free to do so. To me, that's beautiful.

This. I'm ordering a pizza. Any time you do that, you're not eating a healthy meal. I don't need it pointed out to me six times a week.


So, a mean isn't good for you. You could be a very healthy person that treats himself on occasion. Knowing how bad something actually is for you is valuable.

Let's say, my friends and I go out for bugers one Saturday. If I know the nutritional information is I can appropriately adjust my meals over the next few days.

For people that go to those places daily, they don't care. But others do.
2014-01-31 05:30:54 PM  
1 votes:

Steigen: Huggermugger: If these bastards had their way, they'd still be blocking the 1970s laws that mandated nutritional information on packaged supermarket food.

The 1990 Nutrition Labeling and Education Act
I'm assuming you were born sometime after disco


That's when it was finally implemented.  It took a couple of decades to hash it all out, but I know they started fighting it in the 1970s.

/born during the Cold War
//worked part-time at a grocery store when I was in college in the late 70s
2014-01-31 05:29:46 PM  
1 votes:

sdd2000: I alone am best: When you change it you have to have the lab tell you how many calories are in your new menu item

I was responding to this in your post and the answer is no you can use any of these--including nutrient databases, cookbooks, laboratory analyses, and other reasonable means


But you guys, it's really expensive to google up nutrition facts for ingredients and know how much I use for each product I make! It could take a second-grader nearly hours to add up the numbers!
2014-01-31 05:14:40 PM  
1 votes:

MyRandomName: Bareefer Obonghit: requires restaurants with 20 or more locations to list calorie-content information for each menu item on a board at every establishment.  The costs of this intrusive regulation would be passed on to consumers in the form of higher prices


The costs of  a board

THE COSTS of A BOARD

Lawyer has pizza tested. Employee had put one more pepperoni on the slice. Lawyer sues. Not just the cost of a board.


Sues for what damages and what cause of action?
2014-01-31 05:14:13 PM  
1 votes:

Nabb1: but dear lord, someone said something negative about a provision of the ACA, so let's all crap our pants...


Be fair.  How was anyone to differentiate this particular "ACA will kill businesses" claim from the millions of other "ACA will kill businesses" claims?  The justification that this one time there might be some reasonable tweak to its provisions that seems to provide nearly the same public benefit while at the same time easing compliance seems to be thin.  It's almost special pleading to say "OK guys, ignore all those other baseless, BS attacks we've made on the ACA--as well as the many more we're sure to make in the future--THIS ONE TIME you have to give us some benefit of the doubt, otherwise you're being unreasonable."
2014-01-31 05:12:01 PM  
1 votes:
So what restaurant that says in business does not keep track of their ingredient costs?
2014-01-31 05:08:07 PM  
1 votes:

Rhypskallion: Random Anonymous Blackmail: Why don't they just release a chart we can all understand.

A 3-D model is better.  Here's one for you--make a fist.   That's the natural size of your stomach.   Eat that volume of food--no more the rest is wasted.   Your appetite is the result of cultural mis-training to eat more than you need, and you will get used to it in a few weeks.     Carry on.


Yeah, in the one size fits all world I have to special order gloves to fit hands that can span more than an octave. I have gone for seconds at Jimmy John's, because bread is all foam.
2014-01-31 05:07:31 PM  
1 votes:

CujoQuarrel: You know it's amazing we've survived as long as we have with out this regulations.


you need to get out more and see how fat people are nowadays.
2014-01-31 05:07:25 PM  
1 votes:
Those calorie estimates restaurants use, even in good faith, are hardly accurate. If you need to be told that three slices of double pepperoni and sausage pizza are high in fat, calories and sodium and probably aren't good for you, then you probably aren't the sharpest tool in the shed. Of course, if you RTFA, it seems that the industry asked that the regulation be changed and members of both parties in the House and Senate seem willing to help solve the problems and still provide consumer information, but dear lord, someone said something negative about a provision of the ACA, so let's all crap our pants...
2014-01-31 05:02:03 PM  
1 votes:

cman: but to be fair, you would be surprised how much something like this could cost


Okay, surprise me.
Shock me with the size of that crushing cost, but be fair about it.
2014-01-31 04:56:24 PM  
1 votes:

boyvoyeur: m1ke: The whole point of this country is if you want to eat garbage, balloon up to 600 pounds, and die of a heart attack at 43, you can. You are free to do so. To me, that's beautiful.

This. I'm ordering a pizza. Any time you do that, you're not eating a healthy meal. I don't need it pointed out to me six times a week.


Why do you hate Free Markets filled with informed consumers?
2014-01-31 04:56:19 PM  
1 votes:

Rhypskallion: Random Anonymous Blackmail: Why don't they just release a chart we can all understand.

A 3-D model is better.  Here's one for you--make a fist.   That's the natural size of your stomach.   Eat that volume of food--no more the rest is wasted.   Your appetite is the result of cultural mis-training to eat more than you need, and you will get used to it in a few weeks.     Carry on.


I eat that many cookies with every meal.

/cookies
2014-01-31 04:53:57 PM  
1 votes:

Random Anonymous Blackmail: Why don't they just release a chart we can all understand.


A 3-D model is better.  Here's one for you--make a fist.   That's the natural size of your stomach.   Eat that volume of food--no more the rest is wasted.   Your appetite is the result of cultural mis-training to eat more than you need, and you will get used to it in a few weeks.     Carry on.
2014-01-31 04:52:31 PM  
1 votes:

Headso: Langston: Headso: According to the Food Marketing Institute, which represents retail grocery chains, the current proposed menu-labeling regulation would cost the industry $1 billion in the first year of implementation


lol, sounds legit

Yeah, those are rapidly approaching the annual costs of people watching NCAA basketball games right there.

Obama could take like 5 vacations for that much!


Still doesn't approach the amount that pirating a single movie costs the industry, however.
2014-01-31 04:51:36 PM  
1 votes:
Use your designer to put the layout together. email the pdf to each franchise, print that sh*t off on 8.5x11 from the office printer. Post it.

The designer is the most expensive part. Some prima donna designer/ad agency will charge $150 an hour. This will take 22 hours.

hahahahaha.
2014-01-31 04:50:50 PM  
1 votes:

Random Anonymous Blackmail: 4+ Slices: Good job fatty


Thanks, I work hard at it.
2014-01-31 04:48:20 PM  
1 votes:
New York City has had this regulation on the books for over five years now, as have  Seattle and other cities for nearly as long.  As far as I know, nobody went out of business due to compliance costs.

A well informed buyer is critical to a healthy capitalist system.
2014-01-31 04:47:12 PM  
1 votes:
Incidentally all this bill does is change the rule from "having a board" to "post online".  This isn't even news.  No company is going to be saved because they no longer have to have a menu board.
2014-01-31 04:46:32 PM  
1 votes:

sufferpuppet: Ritley: What an asinine argument. The cost of a board showing nutrition info is not burdensome in any manner

How bout the cost of producing that data?    Having somebody determine the calorie counts for an entire menu.  Think that's free?


They know how many ounces of X are in each dish, and the calorie info on that is readily available. It's like you know you put 1lb of ground beef, 2 eggs, etc into your burger patties, and made 4 patties, you can do some quick maths, and find out. Chain restaurants measure everything.  Also, calorie testing is really cheap.
2014-01-31 04:46:26 PM  
1 votes:
Aren't restaurants already required by law to have nutritional information available to customers, whether in the form of a separate board (usually found in an out-of-the-way location in the store that customers are less likely to be in) or some brochure or pamphlet that customers have to specifically request? Wouldn't this just require them to make that stuff more readily available?
2014-01-31 04:45:52 PM  
1 votes:
My wife is a chef, and I have some serious food allergies, so I have a vague clue about how difficult something like this would be to create.  The answer is not very.   Accurate information would cost more--but the odds of quality analysis done by a regulating body (FDA?) seems pretty low.    Accurate information would also be difficult to calculate and maintain.   Ex: When you cook in oil, how much of the oil is actually retained by the item?   Are all slices of pepperoni the same thickness and therefore calorie count?   If suppliers change, are the replacement products equivalent or will there be variations?    How often does the board get updated?

Until we have tricorders or some other tech to scan a plate and give us stats, truly accurate info will never be available.
2014-01-31 04:43:54 PM  
1 votes:
According to the Food Marketing Institute, which represents retail grocery chains, the current proposed menu-labeling regulation would cost the industry $1 billion in the first year of implementation 

That's like, $3 a person over the course of a year. Many people eat out more than once a week... So, what is that, like 6 cents per person per meal? Maybe 20 cents per person per meal, since not everybody eats out the same amount?
2014-01-31 04:38:09 PM  
1 votes:
The whole point of this country is if you want to eat garbage, balloon up to 600 pounds, and die of a heart attack at 43, you can. You are free to do so. To me, that's beautiful.
2014-01-31 04:35:03 PM  
1 votes:
What an asinine argument. The cost of a board showing nutrition info is not burdensome in any manner
2014-01-31 04:20:08 PM  
1 votes:
According to the Food Marketing Institute, which represents retail grocery chains, the current proposed menu-labeling regulation would cost the industry $1 billion in the first year of implementation


lol, sounds legit
2014-01-31 04:14:52 PM  
1 votes:

Bareefer Obonghit: requires restaurants with 20 or more locations to list calorie-content information for each menu item on a board at every establishment.  The costs of this intrusive regulation would be passed on to consumers in the form of higher prices


The costs of  a board

THE COSTS of A BOARD


I see it as a BS argument, but to be fair, you would be surprised how much something like this could cost
 
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