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    More: Obvious, Television in Russia, Leningrad, Russians, Alexei Navalny, United Russia, President Vladimir Putin, previous questions  
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17388 clicks; posted to Main » on 31 Jan 2014 at 3:12 PM (10 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-01-31 10:10:31 PM

Oldiron_79: zimbomba63: Oldiron_79: As many people as died during that battle and as severely devistated as the entire infrastructure of that city was from the prolonged battle they would probably have been better off to have surendered it than to have fought it out from a pure numbers perspective.

But I certainly wouldnt surrender a city to someone as brutal as the Nazis, mothah farkers can come and take it if they want it that badly, numbers be damned.

Big talk from somebody who wasn't there to partake of the sawdust bread.

Leningrad falling early would have been very bad for the Soviets.  Elements from Army Group North could have then swung down and participated in an assault on Moscow.

On a side note, I don't really believe in reincarnation, but, when I see the films of the Eastern Front stuff, I get a very uneasy feeling.  Not just any film, but, the ones showing the fighting during winter. It's like I know this, I've seen and felt this, on one side or the other, and I didn't make it.  No, I'm not drunk...yet.

I get that feeling when watching anything with piston engined fighter aircraft (WWI or WWII).


Oldiron_79, for a trip down memory lane check out this collection of WW2-era photos on a Russian forum (helpfully in English for those who don't read Russian).

http://pavel-kosenko.livejournal.com/303194.html?thread=22669914
 
2014-01-31 10:55:56 PM

Stone Meadow: Oldiron_79: zimbomba63: Oldiron_79: As many people as died during that battle and as severely devistated as the entire infrastructure of that city was from the prolonged battle they would probably have been better off to have surendered it than to have fought it out from a pure numbers perspective.

But I certainly wouldnt surrender a city to someone as brutal as the Nazis, mothah farkers can come and take it if they want it that badly, numbers be damned.

Big talk from somebody who wasn't there to partake of the sawdust bread.

Leningrad falling early would have been very bad for the Soviets.  Elements from Army Group North could have then swung down and participated in an assault on Moscow.

On a side note, I don't really believe in reincarnation, but, when I see the films of the Eastern Front stuff, I get a very uneasy feeling.  Not just any film, but, the ones showing the fighting during winter. It's like I know this, I've seen and felt this, on one side or the other, and I didn't make it.  No, I'm not drunk...yet.

I get that feeling when watching anything with piston engined fighter aircraft (WWI or WWII).

Oldiron_79, for a trip down memory lane check out this collection of WW2-era photos on a Russian forum (helpfully in English for those who don't read Russian).

http://pavel-kosenko.livejournal.com/303194.html?thread=22669914


I plan on getting the book outlining the B-17 pilot whose plane was so shot up and in such a bad way, a ME 109 pilot scrambled to shoot him down pulled up, saw the damage, knew the crew was in no shape to fight, he looked at the pilot, saluted, flew as far as he could alongside (so other Luftwaffe wouldn't take advantage), and let the plane get back to Britain. Both pilots met decades later when the Germsn put an ad in the paper trying to contact the American. They became good friends.
 
2014-02-01 12:05:55 AM
It's great they never gave up. People who give up deserve what they get.
 
2014-02-01 12:41:57 AM

rev. dave: You can't change the past, so why make a big deal about all the what ifs?


To develop those critical thinking skills many leaders sometimes lack. You do this every day with choices you've: it's a important part of how we learn. The more broadly you examine a past decision, the better you're able to consider *all* of the course of action (and consequences of which) when faced with a similar situation.
 
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