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(Quartz)   In the latest French humiliation, the country is now afraid of Netflix   (qz.com) divider line 32
    More: Fail, Netflix, French TV, French films, mass unemployment, value proposition, protectionist  
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2829 clicks; posted to Business » on 31 Jan 2014 at 1:42 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



32 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-01-31 01:59:49 PM  
FTFA: France's socialist government has sicced tax inspectors on virtually every significant US tech company that has a presence in France

Yet they still want to do business there, but here in the US we are told if corporations don't have carte blanche they'll dry up and die.
 
2014-01-31 01:59:57 PM  
I see this "story" is generating an astounding amount of interest.
 
2014-01-31 02:07:23 PM  

bigheadface: I see this "story" is generating an astounding amount of interest.


I find the regulatory/state-run ISP part to be fascinating.  It also would have been interesting to read something that can explain how  l'exception culturelle jives with McDonald's and Hollywood dominating.  I just wish the article hadn't been so xenophobic about it all.
 
2014-01-31 02:13:29 PM  
Surrender Monkeystm
 
2014-01-31 02:18:42 PM  

neversubmit: FTFA: France's socialist government has sicced tax inspectors on virtually every significant US tech company that has a presence in France

Yet they still want to do business there, but here in the US we are told if corporations don't have carte blanche they'll dry up and die.


Problem is when American CEOs say the french workers are lazy, said french workers kidnap their bosses and burn the factory, and the American CEOs points at them and says 'and violent too!'.
 
2014-01-31 02:20:50 PM  
Article is a yawn, its some asshole who writes for a very shiattily designed website making assumptions pulled from rectum.  Meanwhile, a country that's interested in the prosperity of its local industries and acts to thwart giant foreign entities from steam rolling through its economy?  Sacre bleu!
 
2014-01-31 02:21:55 PM  

MurphyMurphy: Surrender Monkeystm


fighting the good fight against Netflix!  until Das Boot shows up that is

/ the germans are better than the french at everything except cheese... and surrender... and berets
 
2014-01-31 02:35:08 PM  
There's something UnFrench about downloading a movie, especially one that is no longer playing in theatres (stealing is sometimes OK, being out of fashion is not).

The French Government spends a fortune subsidizing and promoting unwatchable movies, and dammit, it's your duty as a French citizen to see them in theatres! Then you can go and watch the American Blockbuster that the rest of the world is watching with a good conscience, provided, of course, that nobody sees you in line or it is a film festival.

When I was in Amiens they were having a film festival and some awful American movie that I had seen about two years earlier was playing. I mean, not even remotely nominated for a minor Oscar. I think it had somebody like Ed Murphy in it. It's strange how things become cool when they come from far away and a foreign culture.

You could sell SPAM and Mountain Dew to people if they thought they were foreign luxury goods.
 
2014-01-31 02:42:41 PM  
Netflix sucks, especially in Canada where they have one third the titles (about 3,000). I own over 2,150 titles (many of which are entire series of TV shows or boxed sets with 2 to 100 movies) so my own personal collection is better than Netflix provided you like cartoons, comedies, B-movies, and the like. I don't have a lot of blockbuster drama or action flics, although I have some of the best and the worst. I only watch about two Oscar-nominated movies a year and mostly they are CGI cartoons so you won't find a lot of Oscar winners, even the good old winners of yesteryear.

On the other hand, Netflix costs about two rentals a month, which isn't all that hard to justify. If I see a stupid movie I don't really like but am tempted to buy, I can tell myself that Netflix has it and then the urge to buy goes away.

Netflix. It's like the public library--nobody goes there but it saves you and society a fortune some how that you can't put your finger on and should therefore be supported every chance you get.

Unless you are French.
 
2014-01-31 02:54:51 PM  

brantgoose: The French Government spends a fortune subsidizing and promoting unwatchable movies, and dammit, it's your duty as a French citizen to see them in theatres! Then you can go and watch the American Blockbuster that the rest of the world is watching with a good conscience, provided, of course, that nobody sees you in line or it is a film festival.


I'm ok with this kind of cultural protection.  Film is too important to be left to the whims of the marketplace.  It's even good for Hollywood, which has learned quite a bit from French filmmakers (who, in turn, have learned a lot from Hollywood).  Not just techniques and styles; Hollywood borrows whole films from France.

/Most French films probably are unwatchable, but 5%-10% are really good - these are the ones that get exported to the States
 
2014-01-31 03:01:00 PM  

neversubmit: FTFA: France's socialist government has sicced tax inspectors on virtually every significant US tech company that has a presence in France

Yet they still want to do business there, but here in the US we are told if corporations don't have carte blanche they'll dry up and die.


Which is why Netflix is an American co. and not a French one.
 
2014-01-31 03:16:12 PM  

brantgoose: Netflix sucks, especially in Canada where they have one third the titles (about 3,000). I own over 2,150 titles (many of which are entire series of TV shows or boxed sets with 2 to 100 movies) so my own personal collection is better than Netflix provided you like cartoons, comedies, B-movies, and the like. I don't have a lot of blockbuster drama or action flics, although I have some of the best and the worst. I only watch about two Oscar-nominated movies a year and mostly they are CGI cartoons so you won't find a lot of Oscar winners, even the good old winners of yesteryear.

On the other hand, Netflix costs about two rentals a month, which isn't all that hard to justify. If I see a stupid movie I don't really like but am tempted to buy, I can tell myself that Netflix has it and then the urge to buy goes away.

Netflix. It's like the public library--nobody goes there but it saves you and society a fortune some how that you can't put your finger on and should therefore be supported every chance you get.

Unless you are French.


Much like the French government, the Canadian government sucks too.
 
2014-01-31 03:40:52 PM  
 
2014-01-31 04:15:01 PM  

BumpInTheNight: Article is a yawn, its some asshole who writes for a very shiattily designed website making assumptions pulled from rectum.  Meanwhile, a country that's interested in the prosperity of its local industries and acts to thwart giant foreign entities from steam rolling through its economy?  Sacre bleu!


Exactly. Next time someone biatches about the lack of competition in foreign countries because of their rules all that you need to do point to is our cable monopolies and intentionally slow internet speeds that amount to extortion.
 
2014-01-31 04:28:40 PM  

AliceBToklasLives: I'm ok with this kind of cultural protection.  Film is too important to be left to the whims of the marketplace.  It's even good for Hollywood, which has learned quite a bit from French filmmakers (who, in turn, have learned a lot from Hollywood).  Not just techniques and styles; Hollywood borrows whole films from France.

/Most French films probably are unwatchable, but 5%-10% are really good - these are the ones that get exported to the States


I suppose I can deal with it if it is merely a subsidy; I have a problem when a government sets a limit on the number of foreign movies/music/TV shows that can be viewed/sold/whatever or adds excessive taxes, import duties, or other restrictions on such.  Let's face it: America is, in general, simply better at mass market "pop culture" than any other country on the planet is (the only other country that is even vaguely close is Japan, IMHO).  It is one of our best and most profitable exports in all it's forms (music, TV shows, movies, video games).  We are also the best at intellectual property and software in general.  You ban or restrict our goods, we will have no choice but to ban or restrict yours.  Just because it's "culture" doesn't make it special.
 
2014-01-31 04:41:27 PM  
I hate when I don't edit the whole sentence all the way through.
 
2014-01-31 05:13:32 PM  

bopis: neversubmit: FTFA: France's socialist government has sicced tax inspectors on virtually every significant US tech company that has a presence in France

Yet they still want to do business there, but here in the US we are told if corporations don't have carte blanche they'll dry up and die.

Which is why Netflix is an American co. and not a French one.


Not really, the main reason a lot of big international companies are American is that going international is expensive and risky, so the bigger (and richer) the "home market" you build your business in, the better chance you have of making the jump up to an international player.
 
2014-01-31 06:03:08 PM  

neversubmit: FTFA: France's socialist government has sicced tax inspectors on virtually every significant US tech company that has a presence in France

Yet they still want to do business there, but here in the US we are told if corporations don't have carte blanche they'll dry up and die.


[citationneeded.jpg]
 
2014-01-31 06:29:47 PM  

jjorsett: neversubmit: FTFA: France's socialist government has sicced tax inspectors on virtually every significant US tech company that has a presence in France

Yet they still want to do business there, but here in the US we are told if corporations don't have carte blanche they'll dry up and die.

[citationneeded.jpg]


https://www.google.ca/search?q=american+companies+complaining+about+ re gulation&oq=american+companies+complaining+about+regulation&aqs=chrome ..69i57.6410j0j7&sourceid=chrome&espv=210&es_sm=122&ie=UTF-8#q=america n+companies+whining+about+regulation&safe=off
 
2014-01-31 06:43:20 PM  
The Canadian government subsidizes Canadian content on television. The problem is that the vast majority of it sucks, which isn't so different from the rest of the tv industry I guess. The problem is that instead of dying after two shiatty episodes they do four seasons.
 
2014-01-31 06:51:08 PM  

bopis: neversubmit: FTFA: France's socialist government has sicced tax inspectors on virtually every significant US tech company that has a presence in France

Yet they still want to do business there, but here in the US we are told if corporations don't have carte blanche they'll dry up and die.

Which is why Netflix is an American co. and not a French one.


France has a Netflix, called videofutur
 
2014-01-31 07:09:51 PM  
Being in France without a Netflix would be fine by me. France has problems but this article writer makes them seem like a shiathole.
 
2014-01-31 07:19:49 PM  

jjorsett: neversubmit: FTFA: France's socialist government has sicced tax inspectors on virtually every significant US tech company that has a presence in France

Yet they still want to do business there, but here in the US we are told if corporations don't have carte blanche they'll dry up and die.

[citationneeded.jpg]


You must not pay much attention to American politics.
 
2014-01-31 07:20:31 PM  

AliceBToklasLives: /Most French films probably are unwatchable, but 5%-10% are really good - these are the ones that get exported to the States

turned into unwatchable American remakes

FTFY.
 
2014-01-31 08:00:42 PM  

Geotpf:  I suppose I can deal with it if it is merely a subsidy; I have a problem when a government sets a limit on the number of foreign movies/music/TV shows that can be viewed/sold/whatever or adds excessive taxes, import duties, or other restrictions on such.  Let's face it: America is, in general, simply better at mass market "pop culture" than any other country on the planet is (the only other country that is even vaguely close is Japan, IMHO).  It is one of our best and most profitable exports in all it's forms (music, TV shows, movies, video games).  We are also the best at intellectual property and software in general.  You ban or restrict our goods, we will have no choice but to ban or restrict yours.  Just because it's "culture" doesn't make it special.

Yeah, I think just because something is "culture" it is special.  There's a difference between high tariffs on beets and restrictions on the import of American films.  A beet is a beet*, but who makes a film makes an significant difference - otherwise all films tend towards an Americanized lowest common denominator. But film is too important to be left to the crappy tastes of the French public (who, like almost all publics, are fascinated by anything American except foreign policy).  Anyways, Hollywood has 1/2 the French market; it's not like they are frozen out.

*yes I know they're not all the same, but whatever

Bad_Seed: AliceBToklasLives: /Most French films probably are unwatchable, but 5%-10% are really good - these are the ones that get exported to the States turned into unwatchable American remakes

FTFY.


Well, both.  Some films get imported and play on limited screens, others get crappy remakes
 
2014-01-31 08:01:01 PM  
0.tqn.com

What a singe de reddition manger fromage may look like.
 
2014-01-31 10:04:12 PM  
I don't know why you biz guys get the primo spot above TFD link on my browser, but here you go


img.fark.netimg.fark.net
 
2014-01-31 10:55:11 PM  
Q) Why are the streets of Paris lined with trees?

A) So the Germans can march in the shade.
 
2014-01-31 11:24:17 PM  

Oldiron_79: Q) Why are the streets of Paris lined with trees?

A) So the Germans can march in the shade.


This thread is actually kind of funny.

Did they finally make it a rule to be old and funny at the same time?
 
2014-02-01 01:23:41 AM  
I find French people to be pretty neat actually. The frenchies I know are an eclectic bunch. You know those cable bundles with Internet/Phone/CATV all in one that run... what $125 or so (for 12 months after that it jumps up to.... well they don't tell you that, do they....) Well, France has those same plans for about $55 a month (or so I've been told). And generally the Internet speeds are way better than the US.
And I often here complaints about how it is so hard to get fired in France. Basically you have to be a real shmoe to get fired and you pretty much have a job for life (the way I understand it).

So yeah.... France.... Sounds pretty awesome. I haven't been. I hear crimes pretty bad though.
 
2014-02-01 05:59:08 AM  

Dangl1ng: I find French people to be pretty neat actually. The frenchies I know are an eclectic bunch. You know those cable bundles with Internet/Phone/CATV all in one that run... what $125 or so (for 12 months after that it jumps up to.... well they don't tell you that, do they....) Well, France has those same plans for about $55 a month (or so I've been told). And generally the Internet speeds are way better than the US.
And I often here complaints about how it is so hard to get fired in France. Basically you have to be a real shmoe to get fired and you pretty much have a job for life (the way I understand it).

So yeah.... France.... Sounds pretty awesome. I haven't been. I hear crimes pretty bad though.


I just had fibre optics installed. 200mb internet, television, phone, for 36 euros a month. Installation is free, because the company was glad to free an adsl line.
 
2014-02-01 06:13:07 AM  
My family and I moved to France about 6-months ago.

A few notes based on our observations so far, wrt the article and the comments so far.

- Crime is no better and no worse than anywhere else.  The big cities are big cities...you can expect more crime there.

- The workers are absolutely not lazy.  They do, however, take their time-off seriously, and take lunch, and a coffee break, and have a different 'sense of urgency.'  This may make them 'seem' lazy in a North American context, but really, once you're used to it, one begins to wonder why North Americans are always in such a rush...it's just work, after all.

-  If they take their rights as contributors to the success of the businesses they work for, what's the problem?  I think sometimes North Americans could take a lesson from this.  Once you have a job, it's very hard to get rid of someone.  Therefore training and motivation are taken seriously.  Hiring decisions are also taken seriously.  That said, France is very regional.  We live in Alsace, which has a very Germanic sensibility...people elsewhere in the country will feel differently about this.

- For every company in the US that blames health care or regulation for cutting jobs in the US, remember that many of these companies have operations in Sweden, France, Germany, etc.  They're lying.

- Food is a major preoccupation.  Wine, cheese, local specialties, pastries, candies, cuisine, it's a huge part of life.  Many (most?) community activities have at least some gastronomic content.

- There are a lot of community festivities and events.  They are well attended and anticipated.

- Everything is closed Sundays.  It is strictly a family day, and people often visit around the region, or go to a park, etc.  Every museum in France is free on the first Sunday of every month.  People regularly go to museums.

- In Europe generally, family is a huge deal.  If you have kids, and especially 3 or more, you get discounts on everything.  There are loads of family and kid-based things going on all the time.  People take their kids to stuff that they may not in NA.

- Government services are hard to navigate.  Lots of paperwork, and top-heavy organizations.  However, once accessed, they are top-notch.  The roads are good, medical care is very good, easy to get, and 'free', public transportation is good and cheap, etc...but it's a hard nut to crack.

- The McDonald's and Walmart equivalents are full.  People are people, kids are kids.  French people want deals, just like everyone else.  This is a real country, not everywhere is like the set of 'Chocolat.'

- Video streaming and downloading is basically legal, and widespread.  You can walk around your office and say 'does anyone have season X of series Y?'  Someone will, or will have a link for you to watch it online.  People watch a great deal of US/UK content.  Series like Homeland, GofT, Breaking Bad, are very popular.

- Home TV, Internet, and mobile markets are hyper-competitive.  The plans are excellent, and cheap.  If you're watching material that is originally English, you can change on your TV to watch in English.

- Many people, and most expats, have cheap VPN services to access region-based services.  I pay 30EUR/year.  My closest US-IP server is in Frankfurt.  We also watch Canadian and UK video.

- Manners and politeness are not universal.  You may perceive French people as rude...you might be surprised to find they think you are.  A common language helps us, but a little patience goes a long way.

- French people have been very welcoming to us, and are always telling us how much they love our Québec accents.  They adore North America.
 
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