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(Washington Times)   Turns out some of that ice that was sent to Iraq ended up having more nutrients than originally thought   (washingtontimes.com) divider line 49
    More: Obvious, Iraq, United States, KBR, corrupt practices, civil litigation, military contractor, U.S. Army Rangers, Rock Island  
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10786 clicks; posted to Main » on 31 Jan 2014 at 10:43 AM (33 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



49 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-01-31 10:44:48 AM
What has been read cannot be unread.
 
2014-01-31 10:47:17 AM
Moonie says what?


/Remember when pointing this out was part of a vast liberal media conspiracy meant to undermine the POTUS during a time of war?
 
2014-01-31 10:47:26 AM

yakmans_dad: What has been dead cannot be undead.


/ftfy
 
2014-01-31 10:53:12 AM
KBR. Thanks, Cheney!
 
2014-01-31 10:53:32 AM
think about it guys, if they had to wash out the containers it would have cut into their profits, saying this is wrong is pretty much the same as kristallnacht.
 
2014-01-31 10:56:24 AM

MFAWG: Moonie says what?


/Remember when pointing this out was part of a vast liberal media conspiracy meant to undermine the POTUS during a time of war?


Pretty good. It only took two comments for the trolls to crawl out from under that dank outhouse.
 
2014-01-31 10:58:15 AM
Hey, they took care of the important things.

www.halliburtonwatch.org

/it's just a question of meeting priorities with limited manpower and unlimited deep federal pockets
 
2014-01-31 11:05:10 AM
THE ICE IS PEOPLE!
 
2014-01-31 11:05:30 AM

Lee451: MFAWG: Moonie says what?


/Remember when pointing this out was part of a vast liberal media conspiracy meant to undermine the POTUS during a time of war?

Pretty good. It only took two comments for the trolls to crawl out from under that dank outhouse.


Are you saying that this story has never been reported before, or that the Times isn't owned by the Rev. Moon?
 
2014-01-31 11:06:34 AM
Charlie Abdul didn't get much USO ice. He was dug in too deep or moving too fast. His idea of great R&R was cold rice and a little rat meat. He had only two ways home: death, or victory.
 
2014-01-31 11:08:33 AM

MFAWG: Moonie says what?


/Remember when pointing this out was part of a vast liberal media conspiracy meant to undermine the POTUS during a time of war?


Except this time it's the POTUS whose department is complaining. Which is nice for a change.
 
2014-01-31 11:09:43 AM

Lee451: MFAWG: Moonie says what?


/Remember when pointing this out was part of a vast liberal media conspiracy meant to undermine the POTUS during a time of war?

Pretty good. It only took two comments for the trolls to crawl out from under that dank outhouse.


What troll? He's right. People who were pointing out the link between government contracts to Halliburton (who owned KBR at the time) and Dick Cheney as the vice president of the US (and former CEO of Halliburton) were denounced as "Un-American". Look what happened, the companies took the cash and then did the minimum amount of actual work compared to the money they were paid to do it. Cheap work for max cash and pointing it out during the war was only done by those "liebruls" and those evil protesters who don't "Support our troops".
 
2014-01-31 11:11:55 AM
I'm kind of amazed that people still WANT to serve in the military anymore, with the many ways they screw over the troops, soon it's going to be an empty wasteland of people that have no where else to turn.
 
2014-01-31 11:13:51 AM
Just from the title I knew it had to be either KBR or Halliburton.
 
2014-01-31 11:17:53 AM

DarkSoulNoHope: Lee451: MFAWG: Moonie says what?


/Remember when pointing this out was part of a vast liberal media conspiracy meant to undermine the POTUS during a time of war?

Pretty good. It only took two comments for the trolls to crawl out from under that dank outhouse.

What troll? He's right. People who were pointing out the link between government contracts to Halliburton (who owned KBR at the time) and Dick Cheney as the vice president of the US (and former CEO of Halliburton) were denounced as "Un-American". Look what happened, the companies took the cash and then did the minimum amount of actual work compared to the money they were paid to do it. Cheap work for max cash and pointing it out during the war was only done by those "liebruls" and those evil protesters who don't "Support our troops".


Hillbilly armor...

upload.wikimedia.org

Although I don't know what help that kind of scavenged armor would have done against something like this

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2014-01-31 11:19:25 AM
it's their own fault.
They should have boiled that ice before using it.
 
2014-01-31 11:22:53 AM

Soylent water is people dammit!

 
2014-01-31 11:23:59 AM

Lee451: MFAWG: Moonie says what?


/Remember when pointing this out was part of a vast liberal media conspiracy meant to undermine the POTUS during a time of war?

Pretty good. It only took two comments for the trolls to crawl out from under that dank outhouse.


Awesome. I point out that shiat like this was widely reported in 2004 and 5 when it happened and dismissed by the Right Wing Noise Machine as BushBashing, and I'm a troll.
 
2014-01-31 11:27:13 AM
We shipped ice to the desert? Really?

No wonder we're broke.
 
2014-01-31 11:27:21 AM
I could use a stiff drink right about now.
 
2014-01-31 11:29:01 AM
The brave, patriotic Job Creators(tm) at KBR are just trying to save costs by feeding the bodies of dead troops to the live troops. Sure, it's an abomination and unholy and will inevitably result in hordes of twitching, zombified U.S. soldiers destroying the planet; but the important thing is that the KBR shareholders get a good return on their investments next quarter.
 
2014-01-31 11:29:34 AM
Obviously the only solution is to hire more private contractors to oversee the private contractors.
 
2014-01-31 11:30:17 AM
www.presentaplaque.com
 
2014-01-31 11:30:49 AM
I'm pretty sure this is how the zombie apocalypse begins.
 
2014-01-31 11:33:45 AM
Good thing we have these private contractors doing things better and cheaper than the government.
 
2014-01-31 11:33:48 AM
Wait, there's a market for ice exports?

Woo hoo! We're back in business, baby!

Call Inuvik! Call Iqaluit!  Canada's back in the ice exporting game!

Buy all the freezer ships you can!

Kick your refrigerators to the curb! We're going to be up to our ears in all-natural organic ice! Yuppies and greens will pay through the nose for the real thing over the machine-made kind.
 
2014-01-31 11:40:02 AM
I knew this day would come, but I did not fear it being so soon. I dont have a nope gif that can sufficiently describe how much this squicks me out.
 
2014-01-31 11:41:12 AM

ChipNASA: yakmans_dad: What has been dead cannot be undead.

/ftfy


Begs to differ
static.ddmcdn.com
 
2014-01-31 11:41:20 AM

yakmans_dad: What has been read cannot be unread.


and right before lunch.
 
2014-01-31 11:44:22 AM

HenryFnord: KBR. Thanks, Cheney!


if I'm not mistaken the Bush family had ties to that group too.
The connections between President Bush and Halliburton's Kellogg, Brown and Root are affirmed by ...business records of the Brown & Root firm and Brown Shipbuilding Co., relating in particular to building projects and joint ventures with other companies such as Zapata Offshore found in the executive files of George R. Brown at the Fondren Library of Rice University. Zapata Offshore was founded by George Herbert Walker Bush in 1954, after a successful partnership in 1953 with Hugh and Bill Liedtke, funded by Brown Brothers Harriman, owned by business partners of Prescott Bush, our president's grandfather. Zapata is connected numerous CIA intrigues in Latin America, including the overthow of a legally elected government in Guatemala that is indeed the prototype for CIA backed intervention. An historical outline is available at the Famous Texans website. ...
 
2014-01-31 11:45:06 AM
I doubt the ice was sloshing around on bloody floorplates...  Not such a big deal if it was shipped in sealed secondary containers in a trailer that once also shipped bodies in other sealed secondary containers.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-01-31 11:50:15 AM
Is this a "contractor hosed it with dilute bleach out instead of heating to 93.7C for at least 17 hours before immersing in .1 molar sodium hydroxide for 21.7 hours in the presence of DOD inspectors" type error? Or a "rotting corpse bits got into the ice bags" type error?

I worked in an FDA-regulated industry where the slightest inconsequential deviation from documented procedure was the same as going into a hospital and chopping off random limbs.
 
2014-01-31 11:54:54 AM
Before I was born, the lumber mill in the village where my grandparents lived had the only ice house, where they stored ice from the river (and the only fire truck, which is why my Father became fire chief and the guy who watered the ice rink). Ice cream would come into the village once a week on a train. My grandparents ran the only store and my grandmother would scoop ice cream into bowls and other containers that people brought to the store, weighing them empty and then with the ice cream.

The village was only electrified around 1957, IIRC, and until the first electric refrigerators were purchased, people had ice boxes supplied by the mill ice house or no refrigeration. You could put things outdoors in the Winter or if you had a well, hang things like butter or milk in the well. I don't think anybody had a proper well though, because the water table was very high.

One of the French Canadian mill workers got the first TV in the village and charged 10 cents admission to watch it. The same thing happens today in remote places in Africa where some woman will get a cellphone and charge for telephone calls, but back in the Fifties, this bootstrappy custom was not unknown in the US and Canada, or even the UK.

When I was in Geneva, Switzerland (1983-85) they still had telephone booths at the Post Office where you could make long distance calls. This was well after direct-dialed long distance calling was available but not every household would have a telephone I guess. It gave long-distance a sense of occasion and you didn't need a roll of coins.

The USA has always been famous for molly-coddling its troops overseas with all the luxuries of home (or at least all the luxuries that Americans can not do without even in a war zone), but apparently they do slip up some times.

During WWII, American troops were famous for having cigarettes, chocolate and nylons for the locals and SPAM, which was like divine ambrosia compared to the military rations of the UK troops, which consisted of tinned food that was packed before the invention of the tin-opener.

Fun Fact: The can opener was not invented until several decades after canning. People had to open the early cans with a hammer and chisel or other crude means. It was very dangerous and not only because of the difficulty of opening cans. They were sealed with lead. Toxic heavy metal. The lining if any was also likely to be toxic and if it didn't get you, the rust might.
 
2014-01-31 12:00:42 PM

brantgoose: Fun Fact: The can opener was not invented until several decades after canning. People had to open the early cans with a hammer and chisel or other crude means. It was very dangerous and not only because of the difficulty of opening cans. They were sealed with lead. Toxic heavy metal. The lining if any was also likely to be toxic and if it didn't get you, the rust might.


your point? that companies will kill you for a dollar?
 
2014-01-31 12:03:09 PM
Obviously they've never heard of the morgue on a submarine...
(in case you don't know, it's the freezer... and everyone gets lots of ice cream when someone dies... ya know... to make room)
 
2014-01-31 12:03:49 PM

edmo: We shipped ice to the desert? Really?

No wonder we're broke.


Look, in 1991 we shipped sand to Saudi to build a base in the middle of the farking desert because the sand where they decided to build a base was too fine - it literally would pour out of the sandbag weave. I thought it was stupid as hell when I was there, but I more or less understood that one. Shipping ice, though... Woof.
 
2014-01-31 12:03:58 PM

DarkSoulNoHope: Lee451: MFAWG: Moonie says what?


/Remember when pointing this out was part of a vast liberal media conspiracy meant to undermine the POTUS during a time of war?

Pretty good. It only took two comments for the trolls to crawl out from under that dank outhouse.

What troll? He's right. People who were pointing out the link between government contracts to Halliburton (who owned KBR at the time) and Dick Cheney as the vice president of the US (and former CEO of Halliburton) were denounced as "Un-American". Look what happened, the companies took the cash and then did the minimum amount of actual work compared to the money they were paid to do it. Cheap work for max cash and pointing it out during the war was only done by those "liebruls" and those evil protesters who don't "Support our troops".


Iraq and Afghanistan is why I'll never agree with going to war ever again. The rest of the world can farking burn for all I care, our men and women in uniform should never ever be used to invade a foreign nation.

The only solace in all this is that Dick Chaney only started Vietnam II, the Iraq Boogaloo in an effort to prove his theories about hard power which failed in Vietnam. Guess what? They failed in Iraq.
 
2014-01-31 12:06:25 PM

MFAWG: Lee451: MFAWG: Moonie says what?


/Remember when pointing this out was part of a vast liberal media conspiracy meant to undermine the POTUS during a time of war?

Pretty good. It only took two comments for the trolls to crawl out from under that dank outhouse.

Awesome. I point out that shiat like this was widely reported in 2004 and 5 when it happened and dismissed by the Right Wing Noise Machine as BushBashing, and I'm a troll.


Yes well at least he did not call you a traitor and tell you to get the fark out of the US. 2001-2008 made me really bitter and opened my eyes to the stupidity of my fellow American.
 
2014-01-31 12:13:24 PM
Everybody likes a cold one now and again.
 
2014-01-31 12:29:41 PM

Hobodeluxe: HenryFnord: KBR. Thanks, Cheney!

if I'm not mistaken the Bush family had ties to that group too.
The connections between President Bush and Halliburton's Kellogg, Brown and Root are affirmed by ...business records of the Brown & Root firm and Brown Shipbuilding Co., relating in particular to building projects and joint ventures with other companies such as Zapata Offshore found in the executive files of George R. Brown at the Fondren Library of Rice University. Zapata Offshore was founded by George Herbert Walker Bush in 1954, after a successful partnership in 1953 with Hugh and Bill Liedtke, funded by Brown Brothers Harriman, owned by business partners of Prescott Bush, our president's grandfather. Zapata is connected numerous CIA intrigues in Latin America, including the overthow of a legally elected government in Guatemala that is indeed the prototype for CIA backed intervention. An historical outline is available at the Famous Texans website. ...


they should all hang
 
2014-01-31 12:32:16 PM

obeymatt: [www.presentaplaque.com image 250x250]


I added "Give them armor and info NOT Propaganda and Rhetoric"
 
2014-01-31 12:35:16 PM
So, can we take this as an opportunity to either ban subcontracting or extend equal penalties along the entire chain of businesses from the primary contractor down through each subcontractor all the way to Joe Schmuck actually doing the work?

For example, say a construction job in Asscrackistan is contracted out, and the subcontractor who actually does the work uses shoddy concrete and the building falls apart.  They get fined a big pile of cash, whoever subcontracted to them pays an equal penalty (not sharing in some total, they pay the same amount) and all the way up the chain to whoever lowballed the bid to get the contract in the first place.

/hate the "lowest bidder" mentality
 
2014-01-31 12:51:41 PM

Arumat: /hate the "lowest bidder" mentality


You're going to love this, then: The Halliburton/KBR contracts were no-bid.
 
2014-01-31 12:56:13 PM

MassAsster: I'm kind of amazed that people still WANT to serve in the military anymore, with the many ways they screw over the troops, soon it's going to be an empty wasteland of people that have no where else to turn.


There's probably a lot going on in reality that would amaze you should you ever choose to confront it.
 
2014-01-31 12:57:27 PM

trappedspirit: MassAsster: I'm kind of amazed that people still WANT to serve in the military anymore, with the many ways they screw over the troops, soon it's going to be an empty wasteland of people that have no where else to turn.

There's probably a lot going on in reality that would amaze you should you ever choose to confront it.


Na, I just play in it every now and again.
 
2014-01-31 02:08:58 PM

demaL-demaL-yeH: Arumat: /hate the "lowest bidder" mentality

You're going to love this, then: The Halliburton/KBR contracts were no-bid.


The notion of no-bid contracts was first standardized as a government policy by Al Gore, when Bill Clinton had him re-inventing and streamlining government functions.  The idea is that government will select a contractor for a certain type of service or good.  That selection is the result of pricing, service, and corporate capabilities and is subject to standard bidding practices.  Then, when a need arises, the contract is let to that pre-approved supplier at the previously negotiated terms.

The private sector has been doing this for years.  It's sometimes called "approved supplier" or "certified supplier"  Say a company uses a lot of injection molded plastic parts.  They take bids from any supplier interested in bidding, each potential supplier is reviewed, inspected, pricing strategy and methodology is agreed on and one of those suppliers is selected.  Then the company designs a new product requiring some injection molded parts.  In order to fast-track the part to market, the company goes to its trusted supplier and the parts start flowing in a fraction of the time that would be required if every part had to be quoted and bid by multiple supplers.

The name No Bid Contracts is a derogatory term applied by the party in opposition, whoever that happens to be.  But the functionality has been used by administrations of both parties.  It is a method of streamlining the business of government that makes excellent sense.  Unless, of course, you don't have a clue how it functions and you can use it to bash your political opposition.
 
2014-01-31 04:15:27 PM

Mr. Right: demaL-demaL-yeH: Arumat: /hate the "lowest bidder" mentality

You're going to love this, then: The Halliburton/KBR contracts were no-bid.

The notion of no-bid contracts was first standardized as a government policy by Al Gore, when Bill Clinton had him re-inventing and streamlining government functions.  The idea is that government will select a contractor for a certain type of service or good.  That selection is the result of pricing, service, and corporate capabilities and is subject to standard bidding practices.  Then, when a need arises, the contract is let to that pre-approved supplier at the previously negotiated terms.

The private sector has been doing this for years.  It's sometimes called "approved supplier" or "certified supplier"  Say a company uses a lot of injection molded plastic parts.  They take bids from any supplier interested in bidding, each potential supplier is reviewed, inspected, pricing strategy and methodology is agreed on and one of those suppliers is selected.  Then the company designs a new product requiring some injection molded parts.  In order to fast-track the part to market, the company goes to its trusted supplier and the parts start flowing in a fraction of the time that would be required if every part had to be quoted and bid by multiple supplers.

The name No Bid Contracts is a derogatory term applied by the party in opposition, whoever that happens to be.  But the functionality has been used by administrations of both parties.  It is a method of streamlining the business of government that makes excellent sense.  Unless, of course, you don't have a clue how it functions and you can use it to bash your political opposition.


Why don't you add Cost-plus into your analysis and get back to the rest of us.
/Because you're sounding suspiciously like a government contractor, and I still want to string some of those sumbishes up.
 
2014-01-31 04:42:51 PM

Towermonkey: edmo: We shipped ice to the desert? Really?

No wonder we're broke.

Look, in 1991 we shipped sand to Saudi to build a base in the middle of the farking desert because the sand where they decided to build a base was too fine - it literally would pour out of the sandbag weave. I thought it was stupid as hell when I was there, but I more or less understood that one. Shipping ice, though... Woof.


I really think they are talking about shipping from Kuwait at the farthest. Probably not every base had the capacity for large scale ice production and we could even be talking about shipping to small posts.
 
2014-01-31 04:46:35 PM

HenryFnord: KBR. Thanks, Cheney!


at one time (before haliburton bought them) KBR was a respected company.
 
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