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(The Atlantic)   Football is the most dangerous thing you can let your children enjoy   (theatlantic.com) divider line 15
    More: PSA, NFL, David Remnick, Hanna Rosin, flag football, intercollegiate athletics, Mike Florio  
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3595 clicks; posted to Main » on 31 Jan 2014 at 12:46 AM (24 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Funniest)
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2014-01-31 01:04:31 AM
2 votes:
If kids don't play football, how will they Texas?

Think of the children please.
2014-01-31 12:56:40 AM
2 votes:

Olympic Trolling Judge: ThatGuyFromTheInternet: So just feed 'em ritalin and HFCS, keep them inside in front of the TV, and asssume they'll develop stength and determination and character elsewhere.

Or, and this is just a crazy idea I had, maybe enroll them in sports that don't require their tiny skulls to be smacked around relentlessly?


You sound like a curler
2014-01-31 03:08:15 PM
1 votes:

chimp_ninja: we can't exactly go around whooping kids in the head to make an experimental group.


Lousy Democrats.  Back in the day you could shoot people up with syphilis for science, now you can't even give 'em a simple conk on the noggin.
2014-01-31 01:04:43 PM
1 votes:

chimp_ninja: Mralterego: God people are getting rediculous. 99.9999 percent of kids come out fine after playing football.

It's a violent sport but at children's level risk of serious long term injury is less than when their parents drive them to the game...

[www.pbs.org image 333x397]

So, let's say 150 practices/games per year.  That's every day for five months, which is probably on the low end for competitive high school programs.  4 years is 600 practices/games, and high school football sees about 12 head injuries per 10,000, so....

You'd expect ~0.72 head injuries over a high school career.  In most cases, the symptoms fade in 2 weeks.  However, the same report noted that "In 10 to 20 percent of individuals, however, concussive symptoms persist for a number of weeks, months, or even years."  Taking the median (15%), you'd expect 1 in ~9 participants to end up with long-term symptoms from a brain injury.  That's far from "99.9999 percent".

A lot of high school programs have ~120 kids spread out over teams at different levels, which means you're probably graduating ~3 kids a year who had persistent brain injuries.  I'd bet the majority don't get treatment other than maybe taking a break for a few days.  Competitive kids are very good at hiding things like blurry vision, confusion, etc. from their coaches, parents, and friends.

You can make the 'builds character' argument for broken bones, sprains, etc.  Heck, spending a couple months in a cast might actually teach an otherwise able-bodied child something about what it's like to live with a disability, or be a person that needs help to get through their day.  Working your way back from that kind of adversity can teach important lessons as well.

But concussions?  There's now plenty of evidence that they change the brain long after the symptoms fade, and that lots of low-impact collisions can cause damage without ever presenting high-impact symptoms like dizziness, vomiting, etc.


So your source is the Institute of "Medecine" ?
2014-01-31 10:04:25 AM
1 votes:
Little kids running around like bobbleheads trying to tackle each other is hilarious.
2014-01-31 09:19:39 AM
1 votes:
That's why I'm making my son become an MMA fighter
2014-01-31 02:17:53 AM
1 votes:
It is somewhat dangerous, but the players wear pads. I know. I played it. And yes, it makes your body sore for a day or two afterwards.  Football is the ultimate alpha male sport. It's for the toughest and strongest, both physically and mentally. These men live by a warrior's code, something you probably cannot begin to understand.
2014-01-31 01:41:55 AM
1 votes:

Oldiron_79: Gyrfalcon: Thank god I grew up before safety was a thing.

I got my first concussion standing innocently at a concert--and not even a punk rock concert. It was some New Wave glam rock band, and I got hit by a stray shoe flying through the air. When i was 19.

Yesterday, my 3d nephew came in with a big cut over his eye. Turns out he and his buds have been playing a game over in the church parking lot which involves them throwing rocks at each other and he "got in the way" of at least one. This is the same child who has been playing lacrosse, soccer, football, baseball, riding skateboards, motorcycling since he was 3...never been injured in any way. But gets in the way of a thrown rock.

Kids grow up "in spite of" not "because of."

Honestly who throws a shoe?


Iraqis?
2014-01-31 01:40:03 AM
1 votes:

Gyrfalcon: Thank god I grew up before safety was a thing.

I got my first concussion standing innocently at a concert--and not even a punk rock concert. It was some New Wave glam rock band, and I got hit by a stray shoe flying through the air. When i was 19.

Yesterday, my 3d nephew came in with a big cut over his eye. Turns out he and his buds have been playing a game over in the church parking lot which involves them throwing rocks at each other and he "got in the way" of at least one. This is the same child who has been playing lacrosse, soccer, football, baseball, riding skateboards, motorcycling since he was 3...never been injured in any way. But gets in the way of a thrown rock.

Kids grow up "in spite of" not "because of."


Honestly who throws a shoe?
2014-01-31 01:29:52 AM
1 votes:
Football is dangerous for kids?

i.imgur.com
2014-01-31 01:11:00 AM
1 votes:
img.fark.net
2014-01-31 12:54:35 AM
1 votes:

ThatGuyFromTheInternet: So just feed 'em ritalin and HFCS, keep them inside in front of the TV, and asssume they'll develop stength and determination and character elsewhere.


Or, and this is just a crazy idea I had, maybe enroll them in sports that don't require their tiny skulls to be smacked around relentlessly?
2014-01-31 12:54:29 AM
1 votes:
And the NFL could stop encouraging little kids to sign up for tackle-good for the league's fan base and equipment sales, bad for little kids - and only promote flag football, which is a lot of fun. Eli and Peyton Manning did not put on pads and helmets until age 13. Neither should anyone else.

Well, using two quarterbacks as your only example sure sold me!
2014-01-31 12:48:17 AM
1 votes:

Notabunny: fta In a society increasingly education-based, having millions of boys smashing each other's heads from a very young age on-wearing helmets that were designed for adults and weigh more than helmets designed for children would-just cannot be good.

So Pop Warner knifey spooney?


I see you've played kniefey spooney before
powerupapparel.com
2014-01-31 12:04:05 AM
1 votes:
Well sure. All those chicken wings can't be good for you.
 
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