Do you have adblock enabled?
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(The New Yorker)   Mr. Kubrick, as usual, got the details quite right. I'm still not loving the bomb   (newyorker.com) divider line 62
    More: Followup, Stanley Kubrick, nuclear detonation, George C. Scott, United States Deputy Secretary of Defense, International Institute for Strategic Studies, U.S. Strategic Command, Dr. Strangelove, Red Alert  
•       •       •

8645 clicks; posted to Main » on 31 Jan 2014 at 11:49 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



62 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2014-01-30 09:59:38 PM  
It's amazing we're all still here to read about this fustercluck.
 
2014-01-31 11:52:43 AM  
I guess that means that other generals were complaining about a mineshaft gap!

techintranslation.com
 
2014-01-31 11:54:48 AM  
In before General turgidson's misstress.
 
2014-01-31 11:56:59 AM  

Oldiron_79: In before General turgidson's misstress.


Turgidson wasn't the only one banging her.
 
2014-01-31 11:57:09 AM  
What does this have to do with the price of drones in Pakistan?
 
2014-01-31 11:58:00 AM  

2wolves: It's amazing we're all still here to read about this fustercluck.


Exactly what I came here to ask... how in the actual fark have we not all been blown to hell and back by now?
 
2014-01-31 11:59:03 AM  
Well, if you don't love the atom bomb, then you are obviously not going for the retro Fifties charm of the older models. They were as cute as fat little pigs.
 
2014-01-31 11:59:09 AM  
What about what the homosexual preverts are doing to our groundwater?
 
2014-01-31 12:00:46 PM  

Shadowe: 2wolves: It's amazing we're all still here to read about this fustercluck.

Exactly what I came here to ask... how in the actual fark have we not all been blown to hell and back by now?


I'm not saying it's Aliens...
 
2014-01-31 12:01:49 PM  
Best quote ever regarding Dr. S., from 'A Life in Pictures' documentary,

After Dr. Strangelove people had a hard time taking the Strategic Air Command seriously.
 
2014-01-31 12:02:01 PM  
Would you like to play a game?

2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2014-01-31 12:03:53 PM  

Shadowe: 2wolves: It's amazing we're all still here to read about this fustercluck.

Exactly what I came here to ask... how in the actual fark have we not all been blown to hell and back by now?


Thanks Stanislav Petrov and Vasili Arkhipov. There are probably others with similar stories.
 
2014-01-31 12:05:23 PM  
The password was "PASSWORD".
 
2014-01-31 12:07:12 PM  

Wellon Dowd: Shadowe: 2wolves: It's amazing we're all still here to read about this fustercluck.

Exactly what I came here to ask... how in the actual fark have we not all been blown to hell and back by now?

Thanks Stanislav Petrov and Vasili Arkhipov. There are probably others with similar stories.


I'm especially shocked we made it past the early 80's when we all were just begging for an excuse to light off some nukes.
 
2014-01-31 12:07:46 PM  
'Nuclear anti-aircraft rockets'?
 
2014-01-31 12:07:53 PM  
General Curtis LeMay, the Air Force chief of staff, said. "Nothing like that could happen."

During the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962, LeMay clashed again with U.S. President John F. Kennedy and Defense Secretary McNamara, arguing that he should be allowed to bomb nuclear missile sites in Cuba.  LeMay called the peaceful resolution of the crisis - whereby Kennedy secretly agreed to remove US missiles from Turkey and Italy - "the greatest defeat in our history".

Yep. Never could happen. Never.

/although he did support keeping the bomber part of the nuclear triad due to different delivery control abilities.
 
2014-01-31 12:08:55 PM  

ThatBillmanGuy: Wellon Dowd: Shadowe: 2wolves: It's amazing we're all still here to read about this fustercluck.

Exactly what I came here to ask... how in the actual fark have we not all been blown to hell and back by now?

Thanks Stanislav Petrov and Vasili Arkhipov. There are probably others with similar stories.

I'm especially shocked we made it past the early 80's when we all were just begging for an excuse to light off some nukes.


Actually, from what i remember of the 80's we were asking for disarmament... from what i heard, it was the 50's and 60's that people were itching to set them off...
 
2014-01-31 12:10:12 PM  

JohnCarter: Would you like to play a game?


Speaking of coincidences

The code machine in the bombers was the CRM 114, The substance injected in Clockwork Orange"treatment" scene was serum 114
 
2014-01-31 12:12:49 PM  
media.tumblr.com
 
2014-01-31 12:13:25 PM  

ThatBillmanGuy: I'm especially shocked we made it past the early 80's when we all were just begging for an excuse to light off some nukes.


Please, sir, can we light off some nukes?
 
2014-01-31 12:13:42 PM  
Two Russian officers saved the world from nuclear war. Two of them. That is to say, we were saved twice.

The first was a submariner, Vassily Arkipov, during the Cuba Crisis. The captain was apparently not familiar with the charming American custom of dropping depth charges to force a submarine to surface. He thought the two countries were at war. Russian regulations required three officers to agree before using the nuclear torpedoes. The second in command objected and won the day. Thus preventing the submarine from firing nuclear torpedoes at US ships in 1962.

The second time in 1983 was when the Russians had just got new equipment which was expected to be buggy. The Russian officer, Lt. Col Stanislav Petrov, realized that the Americans were likely to fire hundreds of missiles rather than one plus four as the radar showed, so he did nothing. Although many people regard him as a hero, he disagreed. He said he was just doing his duty and besides, he literally did nothing.

It is likely that we are one man's judgment call away from doom yea even unto this day.

Pray to your gods if you have them.

This is, by the way, there are multiple keys to the US nuclear defense system. If the President were, god forbid, a crazy farker, a high-ranking general or two might refuse to turn the second and third keys and save the world. In all likelihood, the US has been in the same situation as Russia once or twice and some anonymous American officer has prevailed because of common sense and good training.

But bless all of those who have refused orders to start senseless wars. Even as an atheist this is a sentiment I can whole-heartedly subscribe to:  Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall have peace.

You can see photographs of the two "unheroes" here. Arkipov was quite the looker. I bet you Alan Arkin would have played him in the movie if it had been made.

img.wonderhowto.com
 
2014-01-31 12:14:40 PM  

Oldiron_79: JohnCarter: Would you like to play a game?

Speaking of coincidences

The code machine in the bombers was the CRM 114, The substance injected in Clockwork Orange"treatment" scene was serum 114


No coincidence, in Eyes Wide Shut there is a hospital hallway with the sign on the wall for the morgue : "C Room 114"
 
2014-01-31 12:14:56 PM  
You can't fight here, this is the war room.
 
2014-01-31 12:15:02 PM  

BafflerMeal: 'Nuclear anti-aircraft rockets'?


Likely a reference to the AIR-2 Genie - although the BOMARC could also carry a nuclear warhead.
 
2014-01-31 12:15:18 PM  
"Although the Air Force now denies this claim, according to more than one source I contacted, the code necessary to launch a missile was set to be the same at every Minuteman site: 00000000."

images4.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2014-01-31 12:18:30 PM  

CeroX: ThatBillmanGuy: Wellon Dowd: Shadowe: 2wolves: It's amazing we're all still here to read about this fustercluck.

Exactly what I came here to ask... how in the actual fark have we not all been blown to hell and back by now?

Thanks Stanislav Petrov and Vasili Arkhipov. There are probably others with similar stories.

I'm especially shocked we made it past the early 80's when we all were just begging for an excuse to light off some nukes.

Actually, from what i remember of the 80's we were asking for disarmament... from what i heard, it was the 50's and 60's that people were itching to set them off...


You're right. All those nuclear war movies like "The Day After" and "Threads" certainly helped. Reading about the reaction to "The Day After" implies that Nicolas Meyer saved the world with that film after it convinced Reagan nuclear war wasn't "winnable."
 
2014-01-31 12:21:19 PM  

tbriggs: Oldiron_79: JohnCarter: Would you like to play a game?

Speaking of coincidences

The code machine in the bombers was the CRM 114, The substance injected in Clockwork Orange"treatment" scene was serum 114

No coincidence, in Eyes Wide Shut there is a hospital hallway with the sign on the wall for the morgue : "C Room 114"


In Back to the Future, Marty's amplifier has a dial labeled CRM-114.
 
2014-01-31 12:21:24 PM  
But who will defend the purity of "our precious bodily fluids" from Communist subversion?
 
2014-01-31 12:24:46 PM  
I'm not surprised.  My dad flew in B-52s for SAC in the '70s and '80s and all those guys loved this movie.
 
2014-01-31 12:26:09 PM  

Oldiron_79: JohnCarter: Would you like to play a game?

Speaking of coincidences

The code machine in the bombers was the CRM 114, The substance injected in Clockwork Orange"treatment" scene was serum 114


If you were an actor or a tech on a Kubrick film, he had the worse kind of OCD. If you were a film student who likes nested puzzles seeing his stuff for the first time decades later, he had the best kind of OCD.

There's an entire subculture built around the puzzles and internal referencing in The Shining. It makes Trek fandom look hopelessly slack.

There's even a film about the subculture about the film: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Room_237

I assume it ends with the popping sound associated with vanishing up one's own asshole.
 
2014-01-31 12:28:23 PM  

brantgoose: Russian regulations required three officers to agree before using the nuclear torpedoes. The second in command objected and won the day. Thus preventing the submarine from firing nuclear torpedoes at US ships in 1962.


Fortunately, the US has safeguards to prevent that kind of nonsense.

i25.tinypic.com

TURN YOUR KEY, SIR
 
2014-01-31 12:30:09 PM  
General Carey made an admission with serious public-policy implications. He off-handedly told a delegation of U.S. national-security officials that his missile-launch officers have the "worst morale in the Air Force."

This is not surprising - being on constant alert and required to act quickly for something that has never been used or unlikely to must be stressful. I've heard that silo duty is considered a punishment posting, so the officers are also resentful.
 
2014-01-31 12:32:09 PM  

Valiente: Oldiron_79: JohnCarter: Would you like to play a game?

Speaking of coincidences

The code machine in the bombers was the CRM 114, The substance injected in Clockwork Orange"treatment" scene was serum 114

If you were an actor or a tech on a Kubrick film, he had the worse kind of OCD. If you were a film student who likes nested puzzles seeing his stuff for the first time decades later, he had the best kind of OCD.

There's an entire subculture built around the puzzles and internal referencing in The Shining. It makes Trek fandom look hopelessly slack.

There's even a film about the subculture about the film: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Room_237

I assume it ends with the popping sound associated with vanishing up one's own asshole.


Is that last line some kind of Ziggy Stardust ref.
 
2014-01-31 12:35:25 PM  

Oldiron_79: Valiente: Oldiron_79: JohnCarter: Would you like to play a game?

Speaking of coincidences

The code machine in the bombers was the CRM 114, The substance injected in Clockwork Orange"treatment" scene was serum 114

If you were an actor or a tech on a Kubrick film, he had the worse kind of OCD. If you were a film student who likes nested puzzles seeing his stuff for the first time decades later, he had the best kind of OCD.

There's an entire subculture built around the puzzles and internal referencing in The Shining. It makes Trek fandom look hopelessly slack.

There's even a film about the subculture about the film: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Room_237

I assume it ends with the popping sound associated with vanishing up one's own asshole.

Is that last line some kind of Ziggy Stardust ref.


No, it's more classic rock:

2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2014-01-31 12:36:25 PM  

WegianWarrior: BafflerMeal: 'Nuclear anti-aircraft rockets'?

Likely a reference to the AIR-2 Genie - although the BOMARC could also carry a nuclear warhead.


Hunh.  Learned something new today.  Thanks.
 
2014-01-31 12:37:33 PM  

Loaf's Tray: "Although the Air Force now denies this claim, according to more than one source I contacted, the code necessary to launch a missile was set to be the same at every Minuteman site: 00000000."


00000000 and 12345 might both be good suggestions Im gonna go out on a limb and suggest 666
 
2014-01-31 12:44:04 PM  
Does anyone remember Fail Safe, the movie Dr. Strangelove parodies?
 
2014-01-31 12:48:26 PM  

Surool: Does anyone remember Fail Safe, the movie Dr. Strangelove parodies?


Wasn't there a remake done in the 90s starring George Clooney and Harvey Keitel?
 
2014-01-31 12:55:17 PM  

KingKauff: Surool: Does anyone remember Fail Safe, the movie Dr. Strangelove parodies?

Wasn't there a remake done in the 90s starring George Clooney and Harvey Keitel?


There was. I thought it was pretty good, considering it was performed live (for whatever reason). I had to go and check to make sure that I was remembering Noah Wyle actually being in it, instead of just mentally attaching him to all my 1990s Clooney memories.
 
2014-01-31 01:02:51 PM  
With great reluctance, Eisenhower agreed to let American officers use their nuclear weapons, in an emergency, if there were no time or no means to contact the President. Air Force pilots were allowed to fire their nuclear anti-aircraft rockets to shoot down Soviet bombers heading toward the United States.

There were nuclear air-to-air missiles back in the fifties?

Wouldn't that have been a suicide weapon, in practice if not in intent?
 
2014-01-31 01:07:03 PM  
I, too, am surprised we're still here. I'm surprised we aren't mutants as well.

We tested a hell of a lot of bombs.

Things start getting wild after 1954.
 
2014-01-31 01:14:08 PM  

The Irresponsible Captain: I, too, am surprised we're still here. I'm surprised we aren't mutants as well.

We tested a hell of a lot of bombs.

Things start getting wild after 1954.



Las Vegas glows by more than just neon.

www.onlinenevada.org
 
2014-01-31 01:32:06 PM  
I liked the Coen brother's nod to Kubrick in Raising Arizona:

packplace.files.wordpress.com
 
2014-01-31 01:32:58 PM  
Says who? More of the same 'reliable sources'?

/takes a nap
 
2014-01-31 01:34:33 PM  
Would you be Damocles
Or arrogant Dionysius
That head bowed weary 'neath the crown
Could just as easy put it down
Who put that sword above our head
That we should all fear to be dead
 
2014-01-31 01:44:13 PM  

Surool: Does anyone remember Fail Safe, the movie Dr. Strangelove parodies?


Henry Fonda as Prez and Larry Hagman as the interpretor.  A very good film, and followed very closely to the book.  A must see!!
 
2014-01-31 02:11:33 PM  

flondrix: With great reluctance, Eisenhower agreed to let American officers use their nuclear weapons, in an emergency, if there were no time or no means to contact the President. Air Force pilots were allowed to fire their nuclear anti-aircraft rockets to shoot down Soviet bombers heading toward the United States.

There were nuclear air-to-air missiles back in the fifties?

Wouldn't that have been a suicide weapon, in practice if not in intent?


I think those were AIR-2 Genies. If my memory serves, the goal was to use a rocket that, if it managed to even get close to the target, would annihilate the bomber in question. Based on Allied experiences in WWII with intercepting strategic bombers (how many strategic bombers were merely damaged and not shot down during the war?), it made some sense. When it comes to a bomber carrying nukes, it doesn't matter if the bomber barely makes it to its target with tons of damage. If it drops its payload, the bomber wins. The Genie was meant to ensure that the bombers had 0.0001% chance of surviving an intercept.

Consider the movie Dr. Strangelove for a moment. If Slim Pickens' bomber had been hit with a Soviet version of Genie, there wouldn't have been that wonderful moment when the damaged bomber drops its payload on the Soviet Union with Slim Pickens riding the bomb to ground zero.

I don't think Genie could have set off the nuclear payload in Soviet bombers, but I'm not the expert on this matter.
 
2014-01-31 02:33:18 PM  

Surool: Does anyone remember Fail Safe, the movie Dr. Strangelove parodies?


According to TFA the movie came out after Dr. Strangelove. So I doubt it was a parody.
 
2014-01-31 02:37:56 PM  
"It's not the end of the world at all" he said. "It's only the end for us. The world will go on just the same, only we shan't be in it. I dare say it will get along all right without us."
Nevil Shute
 
2014-01-31 02:44:32 PM  
Stick figure Kubrick movie posters:
i1188.photobucket.com
 
Displayed 50 of 62 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
Advertisement
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report