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(Phys Org2)   Ability to modulate in-situ bandgap tuning of graphene oxide achieved by electrochemical bias. Duh   (phys.org ) divider line
    More: Obvious, Graphene, graphene oxide, oxides, oxidation, substrates, International Centre, unit cells, insulators  
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1014 clicks; posted to Geek » on 30 Jan 2014 at 2:15 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



31 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-01-30 01:59:54 PM  
i60.tinypic.com
 
2014-01-30 02:21:16 PM  
I drew a horsie!
 
2014-01-30 02:24:11 PM  
Mind not blown
 
2014-01-30 02:24:54 PM  
have achieved non-volatile tuning of bandgaps in multi-layered GO within an all-solid-state electric double layer transistor (EDLT). The EDLT comprised GO on a silica glass substrate gated by a zirconia proton conductor.

Lucky....I always get sent to jail without passing GO.
 
2014-01-30 02:28:42 PM  
While this does seem like a useful advancement for embedded/low-power radio... why Fark?
 
2014-01-30 02:32:10 PM  
indebtfatshortbadteeth.files.wordpress.com
 
2014-01-30 02:32:32 PM  
I realize that's actual jargon, but for amusing randomly-generated sciency-sounding gibberish, try the snarXiv.
 
2014-01-30 02:33:07 PM  
So?  That makes sense.

Do you even know how a f*cking photodiode works, subby?
 
2014-01-30 02:38:51 PM  
I... actually understood most of that.
 
2014-01-30 02:40:12 PM  
Work has been proceeding in order to bring perfection to the crudely conceived idea of a machine that would not only supply inverse reactive current for use in unilateral phase detractors, but would also be capable of automatically synchronizing cardinal grammeters. Such a machine is the "Turbo-Encabulator."

The original machine had a base-plate of prefabulated amulite, surmounted by a malleable logarithmic casing in such a way that the two spurving bearings were in a direct line with the pentametric fan. The main winding was of the normal lotus-o-delta type placed in panendermic semi-boloid slots in the stator, every seventh conductor being connected by a nonreversible trem'e pipe to the differential girdlespring on the 'up' end of the grammeters.

Forty-one manestically spaced grouting brushes were arranged to feed into the rotor slipstream a mixture of high S-value phenylhydrobenzamine and 5% reminative tetryliodohexamine. Both of these liquids have specific pericosities given by P = 2.5C.n^6-7 where n is the diathetical evolute of retrograde temperature phase disposition and C is Cholmondeley's annular grillage coefficient. Initially, n was measured with the aid of a metapolar refractive pilfrometer, but up to the present date nothing has been found to equal the transcendental hopper dadoscope. Undoubtedly, the turbo-encabulator has now reached a very high level of technical development. It has been successfully used for operating nofer trunnions. In addition, whenever a barescent skor motion is required, it may be employed in conjunction with a drawn reciprocating dingle arm to reduce sinusoidal depleneration.
 
2014-01-30 03:11:23 PM  
I'm always floored by people who get their work out to decent journals and highlights sites--- and then don't bother to put even 10-30 minutes to make a decent infograph/structure-model/cover-graphic/etc.


This is a travesty level effort.  I could crank out a better version in 30-60 minutes and it's not even my area.  Maybe if I'm bored later tonight.
 
2014-01-30 03:25:38 PM  
Dammit! I was just making a lasagna earlier this week, when I realized I neded  In situ bandgap tuning of graphene oxide, and didn't have the right stuff for it.
 
2014-01-30 03:44:46 PM  
This crosses peoples' threshold for nonsensical technobabble?  Really?  I mean, if you're in deep on chemistry or biology journals, you're going to be out of your league without the right jargon.  I get that, but molecular antennae are too hard?

My feeling is that a basic understanding of every word in this headline should be well within a layman's grasp.

//coming up with the techniques that make this possible?  That's hard.
 
2014-01-30 03:59:23 PM  
FTFA: The EDLT comprised GO on a silica glass substrate gated by a zirconia proton conductor. The team triggered a reversible electrochemical reduction and oxidation (redox) reaction at the GO/zirconia interface by applying a dc voltage. This in turn caused proton migration from GO through the zirconia

So you're saying my genuine simulated scandinavian snowball diamond ring from 80's tv commercials might have some use to society after all?
 
2014-01-30 04:03:31 PM  

ikanreed: My feeling is that a basic understanding of every word in this headline should be well within a layman's grasp.


I know what graphite oxide is. I know what electrochemical interactions are. I know what "tuning" is. But I'm not sure I understand how graphite oxide is tuned with electrochemical bias. There is a gestalt sense of meaning that is more than grasping a definition of each term in some additive semiotic sense.
 
2014-01-30 04:07:14 PM  

SumFrequency: Do you even know how a f*cking photodiode works, subby?


i.imgur.com
 
2014-01-30 04:26:18 PM  
Intredasting.
 
2014-01-30 04:32:41 PM  

Somacandra: SumFrequency: Do you even know how a f*cking photodiode works, subby?

[i.imgur.com image 420x280]


static.comicvine.com
 
2014-01-30 04:37:12 PM  

Somacandra: ikanreed: My feeling is that a basic understanding of every word in this headline should be well within a layman's grasp.

I know what graphite oxide is. I know what electrochemical interactions are. I know what "tuning" is. But I'm not sure I understand how graphite oxide is tuned with electrochemical bias. There is a gestalt sense of meaning that is more than grasping a definition of each term in some additive semiotic sense.


But in all seriousness....the lattice has a bandgap because it's technically a 2D semiconductor well.  Apply a potential to that and you start putting electrons in the conduction band, or holes in the valence band, which alter the bandgap characteristics.

It's basically the Stark effect applied to a band system rather than discrete energy levels.
 
2014-01-30 04:53:31 PM  

Somacandra: ikanreed: My feeling is that a basic understanding of every word in this headline should be well within a layman's grasp.

I know what graphite oxide is. I know what electrochemical interactions are. I know what "tuning" is. But I'm not sure I understand how graphite oxide is tuned with electrochemical bias. There is a gestalt sense of meaning that is more than grasping a definition of each term in some additive semiotic sense.


I feel like you're asking language to teach you chemistry.
 
2014-01-30 05:07:52 PM  

ikanreed: My feeling is that a basic understanding of every word in this headline should be well within a layman's grasp.


Most laymen would have absolutely no idea what "in situ", "bandgap", or "graphene" are; they might know "electrochemical" and "bias" but probably couldn't guess what the two put together means.  They may know "tuning" in a literal sense but likely wouldn't infer its generalized scientific meaning.  Maybe they'd be able to get "modulate", if only from overuse on sci-fi TV shows, or "oxide" from chemistry class.
 
2014-01-30 05:22:45 PM  
7 years removed, this was the first opportunity to use my Materials Science and Engineering Degree.

Success!
 
2014-01-30 05:27:22 PM  
although I believe I understood what was being said, I came here to make a joke about "need more vespian gas"
 
2014-01-30 05:37:26 PM  
I think I saw this episode of Star Trek.
 
2014-01-30 06:48:46 PM  

Ambitwistor: Most laymen would have absolutely no idea what "in situ", "bandgap", or "graphene" are;


Really?  Wow.
 
2014-01-30 08:47:30 PM  
Imagine... a world without bias.

/social science!
 
2014-01-30 09:27:02 PM  

Somacandra: ikanreed: My feeling is that a basic understanding of every word in this headline should be well within a layman's grasp.

I know what graphite oxide is. I know what electrochemical interactions are. I know what "tuning" is. But I'm not sure I understand how graphite oxide is tuned with electrochemical bias. There is a gestalt sense of meaning that is more than grasping a definition of each term in some additive semiotic sense.


Graphene is a form of graphite that is, basically, one atom thick (it is a single graphite 'sheet'.) It has interesting electrical properties (for one, it conducts electricity quite well.)

There's been a lot of work in trying to make Graphene into the 'next' silicon (it could basically allow for even better transitors, etc). But like silicon needs to be doped with impurities to work best (Gallium, for instance), graphene needs to be 'tweaked' in order to take it's place.

These people found a way to do this that could be used *in* something like a transistor.

/This is vastly over-simplified, and I would probably need to remind myself exactly how silicon needs to be doped, but I don't have my Solid State physics book on-hand at the moment.
 
2014-01-30 10:58:33 PM  
I had to read a lot of papers like this for Biomedical Optics, so I thought I had a decent idea of what the headline was saying. Then i realized I was misinterpreting "in situ," Too bad, too, I thought we just got closer to organic computers.
 
2014-01-30 11:19:48 PM  

ikanreed: Ambitwistor: Most laymen would have absolutely no idea what "in situ", "bandgap", or "graphene" are;

Really?  Wow.


www.droidforums.net
 
2014-01-30 11:58:13 PM  

Ambitwistor: Most laymen would have absolutely no idea what "in situ", "bandgap", or "graphene" are


ikanreed: Really? Wow.


I was at a seminar this morning on drug-induced tinnitus where the new person in my lab stopped the speaker to asked why people would ever take salicilate if it can cause tinnitus.  Half the room looked surprised when the answer came, the other half of the room had a lot of anecdotal stories about salicilate-induced tinnitus in people they know.
Common knowledge is different depending on who you talk to.
However, it's just a waste of time (and rude to everybody else) to ask basic questions if you don't have enough background knowledge to even sit in on the damn seminar and make sense of it...
Seriously, if you don't know the difference between white noise and pure sinusoidal tones, stfu and doodle pictures while the adults speak.

/end rant of anger
 
2014-01-31 09:48:39 AM  

Ambitwistor: ikanreed: Ambitwistor: Most laymen would have absolutely no idea what "in situ", "bandgap", or "graphene" are;

Really?  Wow.

[www.droidforums.net image 400x259]


Yeah, I can your being confused.  But seriously.  I'm coming from the perspective that I never had any advanced studies in latin, electrical engineering, and materials science, and all 3 of those things are commonly used terms to me.
 
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