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(io9)   Did China's one-child policy actually manage to reduce population growth? Here comes the science   (io9.com) divider line 16
    More: Followup, sciences, population growth, China's GDP, University College Dublin, demographer, population ageing, sterilizations, birth rates  
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3262 clicks; posted to Geek » on 29 Jan 2014 at 7:34 PM (26 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



16 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-01-29 07:37:36 PM
If the headline is a question, the answer is usually no
 
2014-01-29 07:48:35 PM
I'd put it down as a firm maybe.
 
2014-01-29 08:00:53 PM
So claiming that the one-child policy caused fertility declines that actually happened in the 1970s is "like Obama taking credit for economic growth during the Clinton years,"

Everyone always forgets about the time machine...
 
2014-01-29 08:08:26 PM
[schwarzenegger]Yes but dey were all girls.[/schwarzenegger]


Pressure to reduce births was on for most of a decade prior to official implementation of the policy, and the policy itself was never anywhere close to as strict as Americans imagined, and prosperity and education correlate with a declining birth rate, so the answer to the question would be probably yes but not by as much as some have claimed.
 
2014-01-29 08:15:49 PM
Did China's one-child policy actually manage to reduce population growth? Here comes the science a long, rambling article covering many related issues in a vague manner which will not answer the initial question which was unanswerable to start with and if you didn't know that, then please voluntarily refrain from procreating until you either do understand or have relocated to a place with a better school system that has some hope of teaching your children modern scientific thought processes.
 
2014-01-29 08:55:19 PM

Mjeck: If the headline is a question, the answer is usually no


Give this man the prize.
Massive government run social experiments built on good intentions and bad statisticstend to do more harm than good.

/But enough about the war on drugs, guns, booze, poverty, terrorism, income inequality, etc...
/Its only so politicians can claim they're fighting while never producing results.
 
2014-01-29 09:18:33 PM
No, but it held it steady for a couple decades.
 
2014-01-29 09:31:11 PM
According to the article:

Bottom line: China says the policy reduced births by 400 million since 1970 - but some experts say the number may be closer to 100 million.
 
2014-01-29 10:27:26 PM
The thing that didn't hit me until I was actually in China is that this policy may have improved the children's lives dramatically. Think about it: until recently incomes in China were very low across the board. Fewer children means fewer people competing for the same resources their parents can provide, whether it be food or college.
 
2014-01-30 05:59:30 AM
There ought to be a no child policy in this country for a while.
 
2014-01-30 07:30:51 AM
Amazing how in a span of paragraphs a single article can go from talking about how projections based on the data from 1970 were flawed because they depended on a constant upward trend....to talking about how current population decline will be trouble if it continues on a constant downward trend.

It's almost like we're just talking about shiat, pulling speculation from our ass and printing it on the internet.
 
2014-01-30 08:10:26 AM
Given how badly the policy skewed China towards male babies, I would say yes, it will have an impact. Less women = less babies. At least for a while.
 
2014-01-30 08:12:47 AM
The question was if the policy worked better than letting things take their natural course.
Every country that threw its efforts into modernization is experiencing a dip in population growth.
What China may have done is create an inordinate number of males to go along with fewer childbearing females. This can lead to unforeseen consequences, to go along with the existing controversy.

/Of course its only speculation to say what could have been
/But they still missed their population goals despite these efforts, while other nations averaged out the same.
/Most would call that a FAIL!
 
2014-01-30 10:07:14 AM
Um, isn't it simply math? If each couple has only one baby, the next generation will be half the size of the current one.
 
2014-01-30 12:00:39 PM
FTA:
img.gawkerassets.com
I did not know Lesbian couples were encouraged to adopt in the PRC.
 
2014-01-30 03:54:28 PM

Skyrmion: According to the article:

Bottom line: China says the policy reduced births by 400 million since 1970 - but some experts say the number may be closer to 100 million.


Add in the male:female ratio and you'll get a lot of non-reproducing males causing the number of Chinese to decrease even more over the coming decades. I'd say it helped quite a bit.

/Unless the women start breeding like crazy
 
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