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(Chron)   NASA scientists announce the first lawsuit ever discovered on the red planet   (chron.com) divider line 64
    More: Asinine, Mars Rocks, NASA, Mars Rover Opportunity, Colonization of Mars, Mars mission, Cyanobacteria, outcrops, scientific article  
•       •       •

3947 clicks; posted to Geek » on 29 Jan 2014 at 5:25 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



64 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-01-29 04:21:52 PM  
Today's APOD. Does chemical analysis not count?
 
2014-01-29 04:27:44 PM  
I won't speculate on his mental state since he would likely sue me.
 
2014-01-29 04:52:14 PM  
Lolwut:

"Among the six points Joseph included in his proposed court order, he stated that if the organism is biological, NASA must publicly acknowledge that Joseph made the discovery and must ensure that his name appears as the first author on the first six scientific articles submitted for publication about the discovery."

Is he going to *write* those articles or do the analysis? Because, you know, that's typically who authorship is reserved for.
 
2014-01-29 04:52:35 PM  
simpsonsscreenshots.com
lawsuit filed by this scientician
 
2014-01-29 05:10:50 PM  
It's just a rock.
 
2014-01-29 05:14:21 PM  

Fubini: Is he going to *write* those articles or do the analysis? Because, you know, that's typically who authorship is reserved for.


You'd be surprised. Authorship can be granted to anyone who has contributed substantively to a given research project, and in many labs that I'm familiar with, primary authorship goes to whomever had the original idea, regardless of how much or how little work he or she subsequently contributed to data analysis or write-up Though, in my experience, the people who have the ideas are often heavily involved in analysis. Writing things up is for grad students, with the PI mostly doing edits and revisions. Of course, there are no real hard-and-fast rules for authorship, and I know of some labs where even if you were only peripherally involved in data collection you were put in as a co-author... at least for conference proceedings and posters (okay, that's a bit of an exaggeration, but still).

It's an odd request, sure, but mostly from a legal perspective and not necessarily a professional scientific one. At least, based on my observations and experiences in the labs I've been involved with. Your mileage may vary.
 
2014-01-29 05:22:59 PM  
Why did the article headline refer to this guy as a scientist? He's a "self-described astrobiologist", but is apparently a neurophysiologist, and thus, not qualified as a scientific source in an article about space.
 
2014-01-29 05:33:57 PM  
The search for signs of intelligence on Mars has failed

/we found lawyers
 
2014-01-29 05:43:47 PM  
www.trigonman3.com
 
2014-01-29 05:48:43 PM  
That guy's a wack job! Some aliens drop their ashtray and he thinks it's a plant.
 
2014-01-29 05:52:29 PM  
Looks more like abalone.
 
2014-01-29 05:52:58 PM  
It's a jelly donut.  What's the mystery?

Dunkin Donuts is expanding outside the U.S., after all.
 
2014-01-29 05:57:17 PM  
Rover spit out its chewing gum and took a pic.
 
2014-01-29 06:00:09 PM  
NASA: Considering my audience, I'm gonna make this very quick and very simple. This is Mars. This is the lander. This is the Rover.
Scientician: What's that?

i1.ytimg.com

NASA: That's a rock.
 
2014-01-29 06:03:09 PM  

Kome: Fubini: Is he going to *write* those articles or do the analysis? Because, you know, that's typically who authorship is reserved for.

You'd be surprised. Authorship can be granted to anyone who has contributed substantively to a given research project, and in many labs that I'm familiar with, primary authorship goes to whomever had the original idea, regardless of how much or how little work he or she subsequently contributed to data analysis or write-up Though, in my experience, the people who have the ideas are often heavily involved in analysis. Writing things up is for grad students, with the PI mostly doing edits and revisions. Of course, there are no real hard-and-fast rules for authorship, and I know of some labs where even if you were only peripherally involved in data collection you were put in as a co-author... at least for conference proceedings and posters (okay, that's a bit of an exaggeration, but still).

It's an odd request, sure, but mostly from a legal perspective and not necessarily a professional scientific one. At least, based on my observations and experiences in the labs I've been involved with. Your mileage may vary.


Sure, but even if this guy succeeded, his contribution would be "I sued NASA and made them do it".

You don't give authorship to your NSF project manager or the dean of your school because they decided to fund your research.
 
2014-01-29 06:08:43 PM  
That article is about a lawsuit over a photo and there is no photo in the article. FAIL!

WTH?
 
2014-01-29 06:12:33 PM  
In case anyone wants the original of the picture.

img.fark.net
 
2014-01-29 06:13:34 PM  
Looks like a fragment from a streetlight.
 
2014-01-29 06:17:48 PM  

Richard C Stanford: Why did the article headline refer to this guy as a scientist? He's a "self-described astrobiologist", but is apparently a neurophysiologist, and thus, not qualified as a scientific source in an article about space.



His credentials from his webpage  http://brainmind.com:

Dr. Joseph obtained his Ph.D. from UHS/The Chicago Medical School, and completed his training and internship at the Yale University Medical School/VAMC, Department of Neurology, Stroke Unit and Neurosurgery Section.

That does make him a scientist and a smart one at that.  However, he is an advocate of panspermia: the belief that life originated in outer space then it colonized planet Earth.

Smart people have believed in weird things before: Newton published more win Alchemy and Astrology then his did in Physics.
 
2014-01-29 06:22:03 PM  
This is the guy. He claims to be an astrobiologist and a neuropsychologist. I doubt both of those things.

He probably only has the one advanced degree in attentionwhorology.

content7.flixster.com
 
2014-01-29 06:22:17 PM  

Mantour: Richard C Stanford: Why did the article headline refer to this guy as a scientist? He's a "self-described astrobiologist", but is apparently a neurophysiologist, and thus, not qualified as a scientific source in an article about space.


His credentials from his webpage  http://brainmind.com:

Dr. Joseph obtained his Ph.D. from UHS/The Chicago Medical School, and completed his training and internship at the Yale University Medical School/VAMC, Department of Neurology, Stroke Unit and Neurosurgery Section.

That does make him a scientist and a smart one at that.  However, he is an advocate of panspermia: the belief that life originated in outer space then it colonized planet Earth.

Smart people have believed in weird things before: Newton published more win in Alchemy and Astrology then his he did in Physics.

 
2014-01-29 06:26:50 PM  
img.fark.net
 
2014-01-29 06:29:22 PM  
"Bailiff, kick the petitioner in the ass."
 
2014-01-29 06:29:39 PM  

Mantour: Mantour: Richard C Stanford: Why did the article headline refer to this guy as a scientist? He's a "self-described astrobiologist", but is apparently a neurophysiologist, and thus, not qualified as a scientific source in an article about space.


His credentials from his webpage  http://brainmind.com:

Dr. Joseph obtained his Ph.D. from UHS/The Chicago Medical School, and completed his training and internship at the Yale University Medical School/VAMC, Department of Neurology, Stroke Unit and Neurosurgery Section.

That does make him a scientist and a smart one at that.  However, he is an advocate of panspermia: the belief that life originated in outer space then it colonized planet Earth.

Smart people have believed in weird things before: Newton published more win in Alchemy and Astrology then his he did in Physics.


Yeah, but in Newton's time nobody knew any better.  Now we do, ironically thanks to him.
 
2014-01-29 06:29:46 PM  

Mantour: Mantour: Richard C Stanford: Why did the article headline refer to this guy as a scientist? He's a "self-described astrobiologist", but is apparently a neurophysiologist, and thus, not qualified as a scientific source in an article about space.


His credentials from his webpage  http://brainmind.com:

Dr. Joseph obtained his Ph.D. from UHS/The Chicago Medical School, and completed his training and internship at the Yale University Medical School/VAMC, Department of Neurology, Stroke Unit and Neurosurgery Section.

That does make him a scientist and a smart one at that.  However, he is an advocate of panspermia: the belief that life originated in outer space then it colonized planet Earth.

Smart people have believed in weird things before: Newton published more win in Alchemy and Astrology then his he did in Physics.


Panspermia hasn't been really fully discredited yet, it's still a semi-valid (if not incredibly unlikely).
 
2014-01-29 06:35:44 PM  

Mantour: Richard C Stanford: Why did the article headline refer to this guy as a scientist? He's a "self-described astrobiologist", but is apparently a neurophysiologist, and thus, not qualified as a scientific source in an article about space.


His credentials from his webpage  http://brainmind.com:

Dr. Joseph obtained his Ph.D. from UHS/The Chicago Medical School, and completed his training and internship at the Yale University Medical School/VAMC, Department of Neurology, Stroke Unit and Neurosurgery Section.

That does make him a scientist and a smart one at that.  However, he is an advocate of panspermia: the belief that life originated in outer space then it colonized planet Earth.

Smart people have believed in weird things before: Newton published more win Alchemy and Astrology then his did in Physics.




There's plenty of room for conspiracy theories.
To be fair, if life was discovered on mars it would put a halt to any current exploration program. Because we'd now be dealing with a biome and the risk of destroying it with every landing.

NASA might benefit in the long run, but the short term would be total shutdown of surface exploration programs until they've figured out how to proceed.
Crazy people with inconvenient theories are easy for them to ignore.
 
2014-01-29 06:37:49 PM  

Mantour: Richard C Stanford: Why did the article headline refer to this guy as a scientist? He's a "self-described astrobiologist", but is apparently a neurophysiologist, and thus, not qualified as a scientific source in an article about space.


His credentials from his webpage  http://brainmind.com:

Dr. Joseph obtained his Ph.D. from UHS/The Chicago Medical School, and completed his training and internship at the Yale University Medical School/VAMC, Department of Neurology, Stroke Unit and Neurosurgery Section.

That does make him a scientist and an smart educated one at that.  However, he is an advocate of panspermia: the belief that life originated in outer space then it colonized planet Earth.

Smart people have believed in weird things before: Newton published more win Alchemy and Astrology then his did in Physics.


Advanced degrees ≠ smart
Smart ≠ equally capable in all fields
Dr. Joseph ≠ someone who should be arguing with NASA about space exploration
 
2014-01-29 06:43:16 PM  

Bane of Broone: In case anyone wants the original of the picture.

[img.fark.net image 300x375]


You.

You're good.
 
2014-01-29 06:58:48 PM  
I majored in biology, and minored in astronomy. Does that make me an astrobiologist?
 
2014-01-29 06:59:49 PM  
it's his right to be a wackjob, so long as he pays for it
 
2014-01-29 07:05:50 PM  

phimuskapsi: Mantour: Mantour: Richard C Stanford: Why did the article headline refer to this guy as a scientist? He's a "self-described astrobiologist", but is apparently a neurophysiologist, and thus, not qualified as a scientific source in an article about space.


His credentials from his webpage  http://brainmind.com:

Dr. Joseph obtained his Ph.D. from UHS/The Chicago Medical School, and completed his training and internship at the Yale University Medical School/VAMC, Department of Neurology, Stroke Unit and Neurosurgery Section.

That does make him a scientist and a smart one at that.  However, he is an advocate of panspermia: the belief that life originated in outer space then it colonized planet Earth.

Smart people have believed in weird things before: Newton published more win in Alchemy and Astrology then his he did in Physics.

Panspermia hasn't been really fully discredited yet, it's still a semi-valid (if not incredibly unlikely).


You could say the same for any creationist theory.
 
2014-01-29 07:13:20 PM  
Just for the record, astrobiology is a legitimate field of study.  And no, this guy isn't an astrobiologist.
 
2014-01-29 07:16:52 PM  

mudesi: Mantour: Mantour: Richard C Stanford: Why did the article headline refer to this guy as a scientist? He's a "self-described astrobiologist", but is apparently a neurophysiologist, and thus, not qualified as a scientific source in an article about space.


His credentials from his webpage  http://brainmind.com:

Dr. Joseph obtained his Ph.D. from UHS/The Chicago Medical School, and completed his training and internship at the Yale University Medical School/VAMC, Department of Neurology, Stroke Unit and Neurosurgery Section.

That does make him a scientist and a smart one at that.  However, he is an advocate of panspermia: the belief that life originated in outer space then it colonized planet Earth.

Smart people have believed in weird things before: Newton published more win in Alchemy and Astrology then his he did in Physics.

Yeah, but in Newton's time nobody knew any better.  Now we do, ironically thanks to him.



"Even fools can be right sometimes..."


I keed
 
2014-01-29 07:22:47 PM  

phimuskapsi: Mantour: Mantour: Richard C Stanford: Why did the article headline refer to this guy as a scientist? He's a "self-described astrobiologist", but is apparently a neurophysiologist, and thus, not qualified as a scientific source in an article about space.


His credentials from his webpage  http://brainmind.com:

Dr. Joseph obtained his Ph.D. from UHS/The Chicago Medical School, and completed his training and internship at the Yale University Medical School/VAMC, Department of Neurology, Stroke Unit and Neurosurgery Section.

That does make him a scientist and a smart one at that.  However, he is an advocate of panspermia: the belief that life originated in outer space then it colonized planet Earth.

Smart people have believed in weird things before: Newton published more win in Alchemy and Astrology then his he did in Physics.

Panspermia hasn't been really fully discredited yet, it's still a semi-valid (if not incredibly unlikely).


Last time one of my biology professors mentioned Panspermia, she mentioned to overwhelming dominance of Levo (L) configurations of Amino-acids of the Earth Biome vs the dominance of Recto (R)configuration of amino acids discovered in meteors from space as definite proof that life originated on our planet.  But that was in 2003.

Harbinger of the Doomed Rat: Mantour: Richard C Stanford: Why did the article headline refer to this guy as a scientist? He's a "self-described astrobiologist", but is apparently a neurophysiologist, and thus, not qualified as a scientific source in an article about space.


His credentials from his webpage  http://brainmind.com:

Dr. Joseph obtained his Ph.D. from UHS/The Chicago Medical School, and completed his training and internship at the Yale University Medical School/VAMC, Department of Neurology, Stroke Unit and Neurosurgery Section.

That does make him a scientist and an smart educated one at that.  However, he is an advocate of panspermia: the belief that life originated in outer space then it colonized planet Earth.

Smart people have believed in weird things before: Newton published more win Alchemy and Astrology then his did in Physics.

Advanced degrees ≠ smart
Smart ≠ equally capable in all fields
Dr. Joseph ≠ someone who should be arguing with NASA about space exploration


Indeed, educated, not smart is le mot juste.
 
2014-01-29 07:24:25 PM  

real_headhoncho: It's just a rock.


I still think they should consider the possibility that it's a chewed-up piece of the rover, a result (or cause?) of the mechanical failure that has stranded it in that location.
 
2014-01-29 07:28:03 PM  

way south: Mantour: Richard C Stanford: Why did the article headline refer to this guy as a scientist? He's a "self-described astrobiologist", but is apparently a neurophysiologist, and thus, not qualified as a scientific source in an article about space.


His credentials from his webpage  http://brainmind.com:

Dr. Joseph obtained his Ph.D. from UHS/The Chicago Medical School, and completed his training and internship at the Yale University Medical School/VAMC, Department of Neurology, Stroke Unit and Neurosurgery Section.

That does make him a scientist and a smart one at that.  However, he is an advocate of panspermia: the belief that life originated in outer space then it colonized planet Earth.

Smart people have believed in weird things before: Newton published more win Alchemy and Astrology then his did in Physics.

There's plenty of room for conspiracy theories.
To be fair, if life was discovered on mars it would put a halt to any current exploration program. Because we'd now be dealing with a biome and the risk of destroying it with every landing.

NASA might benefit in the long run, but the short term would be total shutdown of surface exploration programs until they've figured out how to proceed.
Crazy people with inconvenient theories are easy for them to ignore.


I doubt so.   One can only imagine the number of people asking for proofs that Man landed on the Moon.
 
2014-01-29 07:29:19 PM  
Wait'll he sees the photos of growing organisms sent by a probe from Uranus.
 
2014-01-29 07:33:27 PM  

phimuskapsi: Panspermia hasn't been really fully discredited yet, it's still a semi-valid (if not incredibly unlikely).


I don't have a problem with the idea of panspermia, but it doesn't really solve anything. It just changes the big question from "how did life begin on Earth" to "how did life begin in (other_place)".
 
2014-01-29 08:08:02 PM  

Mantour: f Recto (R)configuration of amino acids discovered


Should be Dextro (D), Not R.
 
2014-01-29 08:08:12 PM  
 
2014-01-29 08:09:45 PM  

Ivo Shandor: phimuskapsi: Panspermia hasn't been really fully discredited yet, it's still a semi-valid (if not incredibly unlikely).

I don't have a problem with the idea of panspermia, but it doesn't really solve anything. It just changes the big question from "how did life begin on Earth" to "how did life begin in (other_place)".


And how did it travel all that way in just 6 days. You know, 6,000 years ago.
 
2014-01-29 08:17:29 PM  

Mantour: Mantour: Richard C Stanford: Why did the article headline refer to this guy as a scientist? He's a "self-described astrobiologist", but is apparently a neurophysiologist, and thus, not qualified as a scientific source in an article about space.


His credentials from his webpage  http://brainmind.com:

Dr. Joseph obtained his Ph.D. from UHS/The Chicago Medical School, and completed his training and internship at the Yale University Medical School/VAMC, Department of Neurology, Stroke Unit and Neurosurgery Section.

That does make him a scientist and a smart one at that.  However, he is an advocate of panspermia: the belief that life originated in outer space then it colonized planet Earth.

Smart people have believed in weird things before: Newton published more win in Alchemy and Astrology then his he did in Physics.


I'm guessing it has something to do with government implanted microchips. As for Newton's interest in Alchemy, check out Quicksilver (and the rest of the Baroque Cycle) by Neal Stephenson. Wonderful reminder of how ignorant smart people can be when viewed by history. Makes you wonder about what we are completely missing in the "modern" age.
 
2014-01-29 08:23:51 PM  

Mantour: Mantour: Richard C Stanford: Why did the article headline refer to this guy as a scientist? He's a "self-described astrobiologist", but is apparently a neurophysiologist, and thus, not qualified as a scientific source in an article about space.


His credentials from his webpage  http://brainmind.com:

Dr. Joseph obtained his Ph.D. from UHS/The Chicago Medical School, and completed his training and internship at the Yale University Medical School/VAMC, Department of Neurology, Stroke Unit and Neurosurgery Section.

That does make him a scientist and a smart one at that.  However, he is an advocate of panspermia: the belief that life originated in outer space then it colonized planet Earth.

Smart people have believed in weird things before: Newton published more win in Alchemy and Astrology then his he did in Physics.


Panspermia is more that life moves around from planet to planet due to meteor and asteroid impacts. An impactor will kick up rocks that get sent into space, which eventually impact another planet. Said rocks could be carrying life from the original planet.

Panspermia isn't a terrible idea, and theoretically very possible. We've found rocks, that originated on Mars, on Earth.
 
2014-01-29 08:26:53 PM  

efgeise: Mantour: Mantour: Richard C Stanford: Why did the article headline refer to this guy as a scientist? He's a "self-described astrobiologist", but is apparently a neurophysiologist, and thus, not qualified as a scientific source in an article about space.


His credentials from his webpage  http://brainmind.com:

Dr. Joseph obtained his Ph.D. from UHS/The Chicago Medical School, and completed his training and internship at the Yale University Medical School/VAMC, Department of Neurology, Stroke Unit and Neurosurgery Section.

That does make him a scientist and a smart one at that.  However, he is an advocate of panspermia: the belief that life originated in outer space then it colonized planet Earth.

Smart people have believed in weird things before: Newton published more win in Alchemy and Astrology then his he did in Physics.

Panspermia is more that life moves around from planet to planet due to meteor and asteroid impacts. An impactor will kick up rocks that get sent into space, which eventually impact another planet. Said rocks could be carrying life from the original planet.

Panspermia isn't a terrible idea, and theoretically very possible. We've found rocks, that originated on Mars, on Earth.


Any further reading? Specifically, how do we know they originated on Mars?
 
2014-01-29 08:35:40 PM  

Kome: Fubini: Is he going to *write* those articles or do the analysis? Because, you know, that's typically who authorship is reserved for.

You'd be surprised. Authorship can be granted to anyone who has contributed substantively to a given research project, and in many labs that I'm familiar with, primary authorship goes to whomever had the original idea, regardless of how much or how little work he or she subsequently contributed to data analysis or write-up Though, in my experience, the people who have the ideas are often heavily involved in analysis. Writing things up is for grad students, with the PI mostly doing edits and revisions. Of course, there are no real hard-and-fast rules for authorship, and I know of some labs where even if you were only peripherally involved in data collection you were put in as a co-author... at least for conference proceedings and posters (okay, that's a bit of an exaggeration, but still).

It's an odd request, sure, but mostly from a legal perspective and not necessarily a professional scientific one. At least, based on my observations and experiences in the labs I've been involved with. Your mileage may vary.


In my experience (and it varies widely from lab to lab, even in my small department), the PI, grad students, and collaborators come up with ideas together, or a grad student proposes one to the PI (and, often, vice versa). Whatever grad student is interested in it will take the responsibility of the study - managing the lab, getting and training volunteers, writing any necessary code, setting up any hardware, getting volunteers, etc. - and he or she will coordinate the grunt work, like running subjects (done by undergrad volunteers and the grad student(s)). Usually the grad student will do the bulk of the data analysis, and get help from the PI or collaborators (one of our lab's longtime collaborators just happens to be a brilliant experimental statistician, along with his actual field, and helps us a <i>lot</i> with our analyses) when needed. The writeup is a big collaborative effort, we need git for academia. But typically the student does the basic paper, and the PI and other faculty make revisions and suggestions...then the grad student gets first authorship, last author is usually reserved for the PI.
 
2014-01-29 08:40:48 PM  

qorkfiend: efgeise: Mantour: Mantour: Richard C Stanford: Why did the article headline refer to this guy as a scientist? He's a "self-described astrobiologist", but is apparently a neurophysiologist, and thus, not qualified as a scientific source in an article about space.


His credentials from his webpage  http://brainmind.com:

Dr. Joseph obtained his Ph.D. from UHS/The Chicago Medical School, and completed his training and internship at the Yale University Medical School/VAMC, Department of Neurology, Stroke Unit and Neurosurgery Section.

That does make him a scientist and a smart one at that.  However, he is an advocate of panspermia: the belief that life originated in outer space then it colonized planet Earth.

Smart people have believed in weird things before: Newton published more win in Alchemy and Astrology then his he did in Physics.

Panspermia is more that life moves around from planet to planet due to meteor and asteroid impacts. An impactor will kick up rocks that get sent into space, which eventually impact another planet. Said rocks could be carrying life from the original planet.

Panspermia isn't a terrible idea, and theoretically very possible. We've found rocks, that originated on Mars, on Earth.

Any further reading? Specifically, how do we know they originated on Mars?


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martian_meteorite
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/news/whatsnew/index.cfm?FuseAction=Show Ne ws&NewsID=1525

For the ones in the news article, scientists found that the meteorites in question had an argon36 to argon38 ratio more in line with Mars than other places in the solar system. Mars has a significantly different argon36 to argon38 ratio than the rest of the solar system, due to its craptastic atmosphere.
 
2014-01-29 08:44:17 PM  

efgeise: qorkfiend: efgeise: Mantour: Mantour: Richard C Stanford: Why did the article headline refer to this guy as a scientist? He's a "self-described astrobiologist", but is apparently a neurophysiologist, and thus, not qualified as a scientific source in an article about space.


His credentials from his webpage  http://brainmind.com:

Dr. Joseph obtained his Ph.D. from UHS/The Chicago Medical School, and completed his training and internship at the Yale University Medical School/VAMC, Department of Neurology, Stroke Unit and Neurosurgery Section.

That does make him a scientist and a smart one at that.  However, he is an advocate of panspermia: the belief that life originated in outer space then it colonized planet Earth.

Smart people have believed in weird things before: Newton published more win in Alchemy and Astrology then his he did in Physics.

Panspermia is more that life moves around from planet to planet due to meteor and asteroid impacts. An impactor will kick up rocks that get sent into space, which eventually impact another planet. Said rocks could be carrying life from the original planet.

Panspermia isn't a terrible idea, and theoretically very possible. We've found rocks, that originated on Mars, on Earth.

Any further reading? Specifically, how do we know they originated on Mars?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martian_meteorite
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/news/whatsnew/index.cfm?FuseAction=Show Ne ws&NewsID=1525

For the ones in the news article, scientists found that the meteorites in question had an argon36 to argon38 ratio more in line with Mars than other places in the solar system. Mars has a significantly different argon36 to argon38 ratio than the rest of the solar system, due to its craptastic atmosphere.


Awesome. Thanks!
 
2014-01-29 08:57:59 PM  

flondrix: real_headhoncho: It's just a rock.

I still think they should consider the possibility that it's a chewed-up piece of the rover, a result (or cause?) of the mechanical failure that has stranded it in that location.


Opportunity is not stranded.


Opportunity Update Archive
 
2014-01-29 09:15:25 PM  

Scrotastic Method: This is the guy. He claims to be an astrobiologist and a neuropsychologist. I doubt both of those things.


My understanding is that the guy used to be a legit neuroscientist back in the day who did real research in that field.  The advanced degrees in neuroscience are real.  Then he disappeared for a bit and came back writing bat-shiat crazy stuff like this.

My read of the situation is that he is a legitimately smart guy who is also completely insane.  It happens quite a bit.
 
2014-01-29 10:31:39 PM  
Among the six points Joseph included in his proposed court order, he stated that if the organism is biological, NASA must publicly acknowledge that Joseph made the discovery and must ensure that his name appears as the first author on the first six scientific articles submitted for publication about the discovery.

Fark you dude.  You no can haz credit for discovering life outside of Earth by sueing NASA.
 
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