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(Quartz)   Med school professor cuts out the middleman, has his students update Dr. Wikipedia   (qz.com) divider line 6
    More: Interesting, Dr. Wikipedia, Azzam, health information  
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4959 clicks; posted to Main » on 29 Jan 2014 at 10:42 AM (33 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-01-29 12:26:08 PM
2 votes:

MaritimeGirl: I wonder how much money the professor is getting paid to teach that course.


I did this with one class, and it was a biatch, way harder than term papers or exams.  I had to find a list of course topics that weren't covered (or poorly covered) on Wikipedia.  Then I had the (undergrad) students write a draft article that they submitted to me in print, and I marked and corrected that.  Then I had them implement it online and I marked that too.

It was fun to see Wikipedia improve in my subject area, and the students liked the feeling that they had 'contributed'.  But I won't be doing that again any time soon.
2014-01-29 11:10:20 AM
2 votes:
Don't worry folks. I have zero medical training but I'll make sure I revert ALL of their changes until they get pissed off and leave Wikipedia alone.
2014-01-29 11:32:46 AM
1 votes:

Blahdenoma: Why bother with Wikipedia when everything you could possibly want to know is already on Medscape, which is free, and professionally written and edited?

Editing Wikipedia is kind of a waste of time for MDs (unless you do it badly), because it takes quite a bit of effort to source everything so that it's complete and accurate.  By the time you're done with a good Wikipedia article, you're halfway to a publication-quality review article or book chapter that could be part of your CV.


They should bother because Wikipedia is a reflexive destination for anyone who has a question, and because Medscape is mostly unknown and unadvertised.  It doesn't help that it looks like any of the hundreds of bogus "medical advice" websites that are all over the Internet.  Unless Medscape receives a serious PR overhaul, spending any great amount of time contributing to it will amount to very little while the majority continue to visit Wikipedia for their answers.
2014-01-29 11:18:47 AM
1 votes:
Wiki is honestly not terrible for a quick reference to jog my memory, but it does have some errors. Granted, even industry standard sources have errors since it's so hard to keep up with the bleeding edge of medicine.
2014-01-29 11:18:29 AM
1 votes:
Why bother with Wikipedia when everything you could possibly want to know is already on Medscape, which is free, and professionally written and edited?

Editing Wikipedia is kind of a waste of time for MDs (unless you do it badly), because it takes quite a bit of effort to source everything so that it's complete and accurate.  By the time you're done with a good Wikipedia article, you're halfway to a publication-quality review article or book chapter that could be part of your CV.
2014-01-29 10:59:02 AM
1 votes:

beefoe: Quote from article: "but don't fret. More and more of that information will be coming straight from doctors. "

Translation: Finally, a very small portion of the medical information will come from actual MDs.



As if Marylanders know anything.
 
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