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(AutoBlog)   Good news: Volvo isn't going the way of Saab. Bad news: Volvos will now be made in China   (autoblog.com) divider line 33
    More: Sad, Volvo, Automotive News, Honda Fit, subcompact, Ford Fiesta, Mikael Samuelsson  
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912 clicks; posted to Business » on 28 Jan 2014 at 9:13 PM (46 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



33 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-01-28 08:08:02 PM  
They're boxy, but they're good.
 
2014-01-28 09:22:16 PM  
Very Odd Looking Vehicular Object
 
2014-01-28 09:25:06 PM  
Yeah... I like the car but could I get the mud flaps instead of the floor mats?

No substitution!!!
 
2014-01-28 09:46:56 PM  
So less Saab and more Panasonic
 
2014-01-28 09:48:38 PM  
So the new slogan will be "Volvo, they're boxy, but they're made of parts that will poison you on contact."
 
2014-01-28 09:52:27 PM  
Well, at least the company name isn't one that the Chinese will have trouble pronouncing.
 
2014-01-28 09:56:42 PM  

Dr Jack Badofsky: Well, at least the company name isn't one that the Chinese will have trouble pronouncing.




You must be tinking of the Japanese.
 
2014-01-28 10:13:33 PM  

Pocket Ninja: They're boxy, but they're good.


You're thinking of Mulvos.
 
2014-01-28 10:20:13 PM  
They're going to start making things in China now?
 
2014-01-28 10:20:39 PM  
So they'll be sideways now?
 
2014-01-28 10:21:50 PM  

Eddie Adams from Torrance: Pocket Ninja: They're boxy, but they're good.

You're thinking of Mulvos.


You's Trollin!
 
2014-01-28 10:30:49 PM  
Actually, Saab 9-3s are being built in China now, too. Google it.
 
2014-01-28 10:32:53 PM  
It'll be easy to tell if it's a "real" Volvo. Check the crash test results.

/Mercedes are made in America and Hungary so why not Volvo made in China?
//Remember Japanese cars were jokes when they first appeared on US roads, and look how they've improved.
 
2014-01-28 10:39:12 PM  

Flint Ironstag: //Remember Japanese cars were jokes when they first appeared on US roads, and look how they've improved.


I thought they were jokes because everybody mocked their small size -- this was before the oil crisis.
 
2014-01-28 10:55:16 PM  

thornhill: Flint Ironstag: //Remember Japanese cars were jokes when they first appeared on US roads, and look how they've improved.

I thought they were jokes because everybody mocked their small size -- this was before the oil crisis.


They were poorly built, unreliable and crumpled like cardboard boxes in a crash. But they got better.
 
2014-01-28 11:09:20 PM  

Flint Ironstag: It'll be easy to tell if it's a "real" Volvo. Check the crash test results.

/Mercedes are made in America and Hungary so why not Volvo made in China?
//Remember Japanese cars were jokes when they first appeared on US roads, and look how they've improved.


BMW's are made in the US as well.  In fact, at least one of the models is ONLY produced in the US.  Korean cars are doing pretty well here lately too.
 
2014-01-28 11:54:05 PM  
Still miss my Vo wagon.  Transported two canoes, enough camping equipment for a week + away from people and looked like crap.  Put 120k miles on it and still sold it for $700.
 
2014-01-29 12:23:44 AM  
I love my Volvo s60. It's comfortable and as someone who drives 1000 miles a month or more for work that is very important.
 
2014-01-29 12:35:57 AM  

Flint Ironstag: It'll be easy to tell if it's a "real" Volvo. Check the crash test results.

/Mercedes are made in America and Hungary so why not Volvo made in China?
//Remember Japanese cars were jokes when they first appeared on US roads, and look how they've improved.


Audis and the porsche Cayenne are built in Slovakia

And some BMWs are built in South Africa, for export to the US and Europe
 
2014-01-29 02:26:50 AM  
Did they also get the semi-tractor division? China has a million crappy semis they would love to replace with the Volvo designs.
 
2014-01-29 04:59:56 AM  

wildcardjack: Did they also get the semi-tractor division? China has a million crappy semis they would love to replace with the Volvo designs.


No they split Volvo trucks off from the auto division. I believe the trucks are still made in Sweden.
 
2014-01-29 07:00:30 AM  
http://www.us-japandialogueonpows.org/VaterCongressionalTestimony.htm. Buy American
 
2014-01-29 07:50:54 AM  
Funny, I find Chinese parts in most cars now a days anyway. Just look at the electronics my man....
 
2014-01-29 07:57:28 AM  

violentsalvation: Actually, Saab 9-3s are being built in China now, too. Google it.


No, they are being made in Sweden FOR China. although I am sure that once they get the kinks worked out of the retooled line it will be moved to China.
 
2014-01-29 08:04:43 AM  

Dwight_Yeast: wildcardjack: Did they also get the semi-tractor division? China has a million crappy semis they would love to replace with the Volvo designs.

No they split Volvo trucks off from the auto division. I believe the trucks are still made in Virginia.


/ftfy
 
2014-01-29 08:09:00 AM  

Flint Ironstag: It'll be easy to tell if it's a "real" Volvo. Check the crash test results.

/Mercedes are made in America and Hungary so why not Volvo made in China?
//Remember Japanese cars were jokes when they first appeared on US roads, and look how they've improved.


No.

What has improved is the intelligent perception of these cars. The first Datsun pickups to be seen, around 1970, were called "shiat-boxes" by Detroit aficionados. 150000 trouble-free miles later and Farmer Brown is dumb-struck by what he's bought.

Not to mention the slap-dash-assembled thirsty sad pig of a 1970s Detroit moving "appliance" (no, believe me, that's what they referred to them in the industry itself).

Interesting to note that Toyota / Toyoda was a textile machine manufacturer. That sort of equipment gets very hard use and little maintenance; from the outset they aimed for reliability and economy. They may have been tiny, ugly as sin and underpowered but they sure were reliable.

When I hung out with the engineers at Kawasaki in Akashi, and related to them how UAW workers would routinely sabotage a car they were building, I got expressions of incomprehension, disbelief.

It was the poor dealers who bore the brunt of the customer's rage, and they were often the ones who had to complete the assembly of a passenger car sent from the factory with a fark you attitude. No wonder the Japanese marques found such ready acceptance among American dealers.
 
2014-01-29 09:07:35 AM  

SpeedyBB: Flint Ironstag: It'll be easy to tell if it's a "real" Volvo. Check the crash test results.

/Mercedes are made in America and Hungary so why not Volvo made in China?
//Remember Japanese cars were jokes when they first appeared on US roads, and look how they've improved.

No.

What has improved is the intelligent perception of these cars. The first Datsun pickups to be seen, around 1970, were called "shiat-boxes" by Detroit aficionados. 150000 trouble-free miles later and Farmer Brown is dumb-struck by what he's bought.

Not to mention the slap-dash-assembled thirsty sad pig of a 1970s Detroit moving "appliance" (no, believe me, that's what they referred to them in the industry itself).

Interesting to note that Toyota / Toyoda was a textile machine manufacturer. That sort of equipment gets very hard use and little maintenance; from the outset they aimed for reliability and economy. They may have been tiny, ugly as sin and underpowered but they sure were reliable.

When I hung out with the engineers at Kawasaki in Akashi, and related to them how UAW workers would routinely sabotage a car they were building, I got expressions of incomprehension, disbelief.

It was the poor dealers who bore the brunt of the customer's rage, and they were often the ones who had to complete the assembly of a passenger car sent from the factory with a fark you attitude. No wonder the Japanese marques found such ready acceptance among American dealers.


Valid points. This is no longer the 70's though, and lessons have been hard learned by American manufacturers, and especially their employees, regarding quality and efficiency. I am not even going to deny that many of those Japenese companies that totured, and enslaved American prisoners during the war, are now providing excellent jobs for Americans on our soil. I'm just saying I will never own one because of that history.
 
2014-01-29 09:10:45 AM  
Tortured, that is.
 
2014-01-29 11:36:38 AM  

Ooba Tooba: SpeedyBB: Flint Ironstag: It'll be easy to tell if it's a "real" Volvo. Check the crash test results.

/Mercedes are made in America and Hungary so why not Volvo made in China?
//Remember Japanese cars were jokes when they first appeared on US roads, and look how they've improved.

No.

What has improved is the intelligent perception of these cars. The first Datsun pickups to be seen, around 1970, were called "shiat-boxes" by Detroit aficionados. 150000 trouble-free miles later and Farmer Brown is dumb-struck by what he's bought.

Not to mention the slap-dash-assembled thirsty sad pig of a 1970s Detroit moving "appliance" (no, believe me, that's what they referred to them in the industry itself).

Interesting to note that Toyota / Toyoda was a textile machine manufacturer. That sort of equipment gets very hard use and little maintenance; from the outset they aimed for reliability and economy. They may have been tiny, ugly as sin and underpowered but they sure were reliable.

When I hung out with the engineers at Kawasaki in Akashi, and related to them how UAW workers would routinely sabotage a car they were building, I got expressions of incomprehension, disbelief.

It was the poor dealers who bore the brunt of the customer's rage, and they were often the ones who had to complete the assembly of a passenger car sent from the factory with a fark you attitude. No wonder the Japanese marques found such ready acceptance among American dealers.

Valid points. This is no longer the 70's though, and lessons have been hard learned by American manufacturers, and especially their employees, regarding quality and efficiency. I am not even going to deny that many of those Japenese companies that totured, and enslaved American prisoners during the war, are now providing excellent jobs for Americans on our soil. I'm just saying I will never own one because of that history.


Yes, don't buy a car because of what some other people did 75yrs ago. Makes perfect sense.
 
2014-01-29 12:17:44 PM  

jaybeezey: Ooba Tooba: SpeedyBB: Flint Ironstag: It'll be easy to tell if it's a "real" Volvo. Check the crash test results.

/Mercedes are made in America and Hungary so why not Volvo made in China?
//Remember Japanese cars were jokes when they first appeared on US roads, and look how they've improved.

No.

What has improved is the intelligent perception of these cars. The first Datsun pickups to be seen, around 1970, were called "shiat-boxes" by Detroit aficionados. 150000 trouble-free miles later and Farmer Brown is dumb-struck by what he's bought.

Not to mention the slap-dash-assembled thirsty sad pig of a 1970s Detroit moving "appliance" (no, believe me, that's what they referred to them in the industry itself).

Interesting to note that Toyota / Toyoda was a textile machine manufacturer. That sort of equipment gets very hard use and little maintenance; from the outset they aimed for reliability and economy. They may have been tiny, ugly as sin and underpowered but they sure were reliable.

When I hung out with the engineers at Kawasaki in Akashi, and related to them how UAW workers would routinely sabotage a car they were building, I got expressions of incomprehension, disbelief.

It was the poor dealers who bore the brunt of the customer's rage, and they were often the ones who had to complete the assembly of a passenger car sent from the factory with a fark you attitude. No wonder the Japanese marques found such ready acceptance among American dealers.

Valid points. This is no longer the 70's though, and lessons have been hard learned by American manufacturers, and especially their employees, regarding quality and efficiency. I am not even going to deny that many of those Japenese companies that totured, and enslaved American prisoners during the war, are now providing excellent jobs for Americans on our soil. I'm just saying I will never own one because of that history.

Yes, don't buy a car because of what some other people did 75yrs ago. Makes perfect sense.


That's why Jews don't drive Mercedes-Benz and BMW automobiles.
 
2014-01-29 12:37:36 PM  
つ ◕_◕ ༽つ  Give DIRETIDE༼ つ ◕_◕ ༽つ
 
2014-01-29 02:32:38 PM  
Panaphonic, Magnetbox, and Sorny. Some fine old brands!
 
2014-01-29 02:50:15 PM  
What's going to be really fun is when China starts mass production of their mid-size passenger jet. You can do 'quality fade' with sports shoes or electric fans but when your aircraft start to fall apart in flight (or simply fall from the sky inexplicably) your customers will not be amused.

Here in Indonesia some penny-wise-pound-foolish industrialists have been buying medium-size (50kw) Chinese gensets. Badly undercutting the Yanmar and other Japanese brands on price, and reasonably effective when brand-new.

Six months down th road something seizes up. The owner, whose widget factory is now without electrical power, phones the seller and moans.

The standard response? "You bought it. It's your problem."
 
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