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(The Sports Bank.net)   NCAA responds to athletes unionizing; SPOILER ALERT: they're not too happy   (thesportsbank.net ) divider line
    More: Obvious, NCAA, college sports, NCAA responds, affiliated institution, National Labor Relations Act, Fulbright Scholar, Fair Labor Standards Act, Fox Sports Radio  
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1480 clicks; posted to Sports » on 28 Jan 2014 at 6:59 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-01-28 03:34:39 PM  
SPOILER ALERT: they're not too happy

Good.

 "Every time I call it a game, you call it a business. And every time I call it a business, you call it a game."
 
2014-01-28 03:37:19 PM  
Yeah of course they're not too happy; they're going to lose their free labor.
 
2014-01-28 03:43:28 PM  
"there is no right to organize student-athletes"


Where's the right to keep them from organizing?
 
2014-01-28 03:52:12 PM  

Blues_X: "there is no right to organize student-athletes"

Where's the right to keep them from organizing?


What do you think this is, a free country?  Guess again, pal.
 
2014-01-28 04:10:28 PM  
This union-backed attempt to turn student-athletes into employees undermines the purpose of college: an education.

Holy shiat - I can only imagine the difficulty the guy had keeping a straight face for that.
 
2014-01-28 05:52:03 PM  
This issue is going to go from interesting to annoying really quickly isnt it?
 
2014-01-28 05:54:34 PM  
Ah yes, the same lesson about unions is illustrated once again.

Exercising collective bargaining power is totally fine, until the wrong people want to do it for the wrong reasons. Then it's undemocratic, socialist and flat out wrong.
 
2014-01-28 05:55:28 PM  

Benevolent Misanthrope: This union-backed attempt to turn student-athletes into employees undermines the purpose of college: an education.

Holy shiat - I can only imagine the difficulty the guy had keeping a straight face for that.


In most cases it's also true. Even in Division 1 most athletes in most sports have no hope of going pro.

The situation ay Alabama isn't the same as it is at Tulane which isn't the same as it is at Colgate.

The NCAA exists to try to maintain an even playing field between schools, and to provide equal opportunity and equal protection to all student athletes.

If someone wants to get paid to play football they can try out for the CFL, AFL, and eventually the NFL when they qualify. That isn't the role of the school.
 
2014-01-28 06:31:40 PM  

Gunny Highway: This issue is going to go from interesting to annoying really quickly isnt it?

1.bp.blogspot.com

 
2014-01-28 06:38:35 PM  
I honestly think this whole problem could be solved by allowing athletes full control of their names and stuff.  Don't pay them but allow them to have endorsements and stuff.  Make a rule saying that players aren't allowed to sign contracts until at least 1 year of eligability is completed so that boosters can't try and recruit players.  Make the crap on the up and up.  This also allows other non popular players to hold normal jobs without the fear of "using their fame penalty" or whatever the NCAA calls it.
 
2014-01-28 07:06:06 PM  
Interesting thought: Go ahead and pay them. Include the cost of their "education", room, and board. Classify them as employees. Wait until these new employees see the corresponding tax bill
 
2014-01-28 07:06:20 PM  
anything that makes the NCAA look bad I'm all for.
 
2014-01-28 07:07:15 PM  

TuteTibiImperes: The NCAA exists to try to maintain an even playing field between schools, and to provide equal opportunity and equal protection to all student athletes.


hahahahahahaha

except for right here when they are saying "you want protection? go fark yourselves"
 
2014-01-28 07:13:51 PM  
I support the players in unionizing.
 
2014-01-28 07:13:58 PM  
Get ready for lazy athletes skipping practice, showing up Drunk to games, not doing hw, then Union reps stepping in so they cant get kicked off the team.
 
2014-01-28 07:14:30 PM  

TuteTibiImperes: Benevolent Misanthrope: This union-backed attempt to turn student-athletes into employees undermines the purpose of college: an education.

Holy shiat - I can only imagine the difficulty the guy had keeping a straight face for that.

In most cases it's also true. Even in Division 1 most athletes in most sports have no hope of going pro.

The situation ay Alabama isn't the same as it is at Tulane which isn't the same as it is at Colgate.

The NCAA exists to try to maintain an even playing field between schools, and to provide equal opportunity and equal protection to all student athletes.

If someone wants to get paid to play football they can try out for the CFL, AFL, and eventually the NFL when they qualify. That isn't the role of the school.


I have worked at several major football schools.  I can tell you from first-hand experience, the purpose of "student athletes" in the major sports programs (Division 1 football and basketball especially) is most certainly NOT to get an education.  They are employees of (more like "wholly owned by") the University Athletics Department, and in the majority of cases their classwork is quite obviously and openly secondary at best.  Tertiary, quite often.
 
2014-01-28 07:19:19 PM  

bangmaid: Get ready for lazy athletes skipping practice, showing up Drunk to games, not doing hw, then Union reps stepping in so they cant get kicked off the team.


lol.

You mean what already happens in classes at not all but many football schools?

But yeah.  Unions will ruin everything.  Sure.
 
2014-01-28 07:22:22 PM  
3.bp.blogspot.com

Put out the word: it'll be forty whips of the lash to any student ath-o-lete who joins this heah insurrection!
 
2014-01-28 07:22:36 PM  
Good.  Though I guess if the colleges have to pay their talent they'll have to start charging for admission, concessions, perhaps sell some logo-ed merch, maybe even see if there's interest in getting paid by networks in exchange for showing the games on TV.

Oh... they already generate revenue based on all that stuff?  Sounds like there's a whole class of people who've been farked all these years.
 
2014-01-28 07:26:37 PM  
"This union-backed attempt to turn student-athletes into employees undermines the purpose of college: an education,"

If that was the case, you'd probably care about graduation more of them and steering them away from worthless majors and easy classes.

I don't think anyone is really fooled by this except for the people that want to be.
 
2014-01-28 07:28:23 PM  
Yeah. Sure. Voluntary. Never mind the fast that half of some of those teams wouldn't even be able to afford to go to college at all if it weren't for football, and if they get booted off the team, they drop out of school basically immediately because they can no longer afford to attend without the scholarship.

Voluntary.
 
2014-01-28 07:30:49 PM  

TuteTibiImperes: The NCAA exists to try to maintain an even playing field between schools, and to provide equal opportunity and equal protection to all student athletes.


As someone who played an NCAA sport (of the non-revenue variety) I can tell that you have no idea what you're talking about.  The NCAA exists to make money for itself.  They're an incredibly top-heavy organization.  They rarely enforce rules or investigate, and on the rare occasion that they do investigate, they prefer to go after small schools and non-revenue sports, while ignoring the rampant cheating done (but not self-reported) by DIs, especially in revenue sports.

If the purpose of college is an education, and sports happens to support that for a particular athlete, that is purely because the individual college or university went the extra mile to help, and not at all the result of any action taken by the NCAA.
 
2014-01-28 07:32:19 PM  

Blues_X: Where's the right to keep them from organizing?


right? None.
But i'm sure a lot of students will receive friendly "reminders" that this sort of thing could get their scholarship revoked.
 
2014-01-28 07:34:12 PM  
"There is no employment relationship between the NCAA, its affiliated institutions or student-athletes."

Of course there is.  The term "student-athlete" was made up by NCAA executive director Walter Byers* and his buddies so that athletes would not be eligible for workers' compensation claims.

*according to Mr. Byers own autobiography, where he also calls the NCAA's attitude towards athletes "a plantation mentality"
 
2014-01-28 07:37:10 PM  
So it's the generic "Prey on the white trash fans' ignorance and hatred of unions" derp that's par for the course among the NFL, MLB, NBA, and every other sports league the NCAA claims to be different from.
 
2014-01-28 07:43:04 PM  

Mercutio74: Good.  Though I guess if the colleges have to pay their talent they'll have to start charging for admission, concessions, perhaps sell some logo-ed merch, maybe even see if there's interest in getting paid by networks in exchange for showing the games on TV.

Oh... they already generate revenue based on all that stuff?  Sounds like there's a whole class of people who've been farked all these years.


This is what's really irksome.  For the colleges that have profitable athletic programs (and most don't, but I'll cover that later), their profit margins are silly high.  They don't pay for most of their labor, but they still get great income.  Check out the budgets and profits of some major athletic departments (here's a link to a USA today article with a table at the bottom, feel free to google around more).  The really profitable schools make $20 million + in profits each year.  Even if they paid athletes well, they'd still be in the black.

Now, that said, the vast majority of NCAA member schools (most of DI and all of DII and DIII) lose money on sports.  I don't think it's necessarily fair to ask for athletic departments to pay athletes if the departments are already losing money (which would indicate that those athletes aren't generating revenue for the university).  But profitable athletic departments?  You know, those ones that put their athletes on national television, and sell apparel with the athlete's name on it?  Fark those guys, they can pay.
 
2014-01-28 07:43:57 PM  
SOLIDARITY NOW!
 
2014-01-28 07:50:35 PM  

RickyWilliams'sBong: So it's the generic "Prey on the white trash fans' ignorance and hatred of unions" derp that's par for the course among the NFL, MLB, NBA, and every other sports league the NCAA claims to be different from.


Well, it's not so much "ignorance" as "reality" in the south. People want to work here and many people from up north have moved here because they find that unions hault everything up north. My dad is actually a union leader in this area in the south, but my mother is the most anti-union person you can find.
 
2014-01-28 07:52:04 PM  

HMS_Blinkin: Now, that said, the vast majority of NCAA member schools (most of DI and all of DII and DIII) lose money on sports.


PS this is bullshiat too

http://regressing.deadspin.com/teams-in-the-orange-bowl-dont-make-an y- money-and-othe-1494130032


http://deadspin.com/why-the-arguments-against-ncaa-pay-for-play-suck -1 481854847
 
2014-01-28 07:55:01 PM  
I'm no fan of unions, but go go gadget student unions.  fark the NCAA!
 
2014-01-28 07:55:26 PM  

TuteTibiImperes: The NCAA exists to try to maintain an even playing field between schools, and to provide equal opportunity and equal protection to all student athletes.


If someone wants to get paid to play football they can try out for the CFL, AFL, and eventually the NFL when they qualify. That isn't the role of the school.

Weapons-grade stupid.
 
2014-01-28 07:55:56 PM  

HMS_Blinkin: TuteTibiImperes: The NCAA exists to try to maintain an even playing field between schools, and to provide equal opportunity and equal protection to all student athletes.

As someone who played an NCAA sport (of the non-revenue variety) I can tell that you have no idea what you're talking about.  The NCAA exists to make money for itself.  They're an incredibly top-heavy organization.  They rarely enforce rules or investigate, and on the rare occasion that they do investigate, they prefer to go after small schools and non-revenue sports, while ignoring the rampant cheating done (but not self-reported) by DIs, especially in revenue sports.

If the purpose of college is an education, and sports happens to support that for a particular athlete, that is purely because the individual college or university went the extra mile to help, and not at all the result of any action taken by the NCAA.


What we need is a level of football akin to hockey juniors (unpaid) or major juniors (paid), both 16-20 yrs old.

NCAA hockey players lose scholarships if they play for the major juniors, though most do play junior hockey. Players who have a shot at pro and aren't scholarly go major junior, and if Canadian, will get money towards college in Canada. Most (relative to football) guys who opt to play NCAA hockey actually want an education, or are goalies where they develop well in college hockey.

NCAA Div. I football really is semi-pro, it's the only real step between HS and NFL. We can't criticize players with skill who either no interest or ability for higher education. How many actually get drafted firect to NFL from HS?

They should at least get a portion of any revenue they help create.
 
2014-01-28 07:57:50 PM  
If you read the reasons behind why the students are trying to organize, it's actually not about getting paid as in salary: it's about being able to cover injuries which are sustained from playing football which may not materialize until after graduation, when they're no longer covered by the school's health plan (as well as a few other things, such as trying to even out the discrepancy where red-shirt freshmen get a 5th year of school paid for, while true freshmen have no such opportunity to get their first year of grad school paid for my scholarship).

Now, that being said, part of the reason the NCAA will fight this tooth and nail is because once it's established that there IS a union, things like getting pay will become more probable in the future. But that's not what this is about at all.

The most interesting thing out of this so far is that the NFLPA is supporting the students. If the NFLPA were willing to strike in solidarity, I wonder what would happen....
 
2014-01-28 07:59:30 PM  

ytterbium: How many actually get drafted firect to NFL from HS?


None. The NFL has a rule against it.
 
2014-01-28 08:00:09 PM  

Benevolent Misanthrope: TuteTibiImperes: Benevolent Misanthrope: This union-backed attempt to turn student-athletes into employees undermines the purpose of college: an education.

Holy shiat - I can only imagine the difficulty the guy had keeping a straight face for that.

In most cases it's also true. Even in Division 1 most athletes in most sports have no hope of going pro.

The situation ay Alabama isn't the same as it is at Tulane which isn't the same as it is at Colgate.

The NCAA exists to try to maintain an even playing field between schools, and to provide equal opportunity and equal protection to all student athletes.

If someone wants to get paid to play football they can try out for the CFL, AFL, and eventually the NFL when they qualify. That isn't the role of the school.

I have worked at several major football schools.  I can tell you from first-hand experience, the purpose of "student athletes" in the major sports programs (Division 1 football and basketball especially) is most certainly NOT to get an education.  They are employees of (more like "wholly owned by") the University Athletics Department, and in the majority of cases their classwork is quite obviously and openly secondary at best.  Tertiary, quite often.


I'm not saying that there aren't schools where that is the case, but they aren't the majority.  There are roughly 1,100 schools who are part of the NCAA across all three divisions.  There are 66 or so 'big time' football schools in the major BCS conferences.  There are a few more that have big time basketball that don't have big time football, and vice versa, but many of the big football schools are also big basketball schools.

While it's true that there are probably some non-AQ FBS teams that also play it fast and loose with academics, some of the big name schools do take it seriously.  In any event the revenue athletes in the major conferences only make up a small portion of the total number of NCAA student athletes.

Here's the big problem with paying players - some of the big schools like Alabama, Michigan, Texas, etc, can easily afford it.  A lot of the smaller schools whose attendance is closer to 20K per game than 80K, and who don't have big television contracts, can't.  Football doesn't make money for all of the teams even at the FBS level, and allowing payers to be paid would give some schools and unfair advantage.  You'd either see the gulf between the top programs and everyone else widen even more, or you'd see a lot of schools start to drop their programs if they couldn't continue on without paying.

HMS_Blinkin: TuteTibiImperes: The NCAA exists to try to maintain an even playing field between schools, and to provide equal opportunity and equal protection to all student athletes.

As someone who played an NCAA sport (of the non-revenue variety) I can tell that you have no idea what you're talking about.  The NCAA exists to make money for itself.  They're an incredibly top-heavy organization.  They rarely enforce rules or investigate, and on the rare occasion that they do investigate, they prefer to go after small schools and non-revenue sports, while ignoring the rampant cheating done (but not self-reported) by DIs, especially in revenue sports.

If the purpose of college is an education, and sports happens to support that for a particular athlete, that is purely because the individual college or university went the extra mile to help, and not at all the result of any action taken by the NCAA.


The NCAA itself is a non-profit, just like the NFL.  Certain member institutions make a huge amount of money, and yes, the head office NCAA employees earn a good living at the top end as well, but most of the money stays with the schools.  Outside of the NCAA Basketball tournament the NCAA loses money on a lot of the things they do, for example every year in the FCS Football playoffs, even though they receive part of the gate from every game (the schools usually lose money on the playoffs as well).

The application of the rules isn't always as even handed as it could be, and there are certainly some 'WTF' results from investigations, but they do more good than harm.
 
2014-01-28 08:00:23 PM  

Jragghen: If you read the reasons behind why the students are trying to organize, it's actually not about getting paid as in salary: it's about being able to cover injuries which are sustained from playing football which may not materialize until after graduation, when they're no longer covered by the school's health plan (as well as a few other things, such as trying to even out the discrepancy where red-shirt freshmen get a 5th year of school paid for, while true freshmen have no such opportunity to get their first year of grad school paid for my scholarship).

Now, that being said, part of the reason the NCAA will fight this tooth and nail is because once it's established that there IS a union, things like getting pay will become more probable in the future. But that's not what this is about at all.

The most interesting thing out of this so far is that the NFLPA is supporting the students. If the NFLPA were willing to strike in solidarity, I wonder what would happen....


So it's about CTE and other brain injuries then?
 
2014-01-28 08:00:41 PM  

cookiefleck: Well, it's not so much "ignorance" as "reality" in the south. People want to work here and many people from up north have moved here because they find that unions hault everything up north. My dad is actually a union leader in this area in the south, but my mother is the most anti-union person you can find.


Oh, bullshiat.  Middle-aged and old people move here because the weather's nicer and their savings goes farther.

And Texas is not part of the South.
 
2014-01-28 08:02:22 PM  

Tunk87: Interesting thought: Go ahead and pay them. Include the cost of their "education", room, and board. Classify them as employees. Wait until these new employees see the corresponding tax bill


I think this is something a lot of people in here are ignoring and that some of these players may want to think about. I am all for organized labor but it should probably be pointed out that there are actually many benefits to being a "student-athlete" that may trump any that might come from being a unionized employee.

I'm not sure what the tax implications would be from this and weather or not tuition could be taxable if it is considered to be part of a player's income for his play. If it is these guys may be asking for something that would hurt more people than it helps. Sure the stars could earn money from endorsements and fame but the other 70 or so guys on the team who are just freshmen or backups may get shafted.

Hopefully someone here with more knowledge on taxes and tuition could explain this better to me?
 
2014-01-28 08:06:57 PM  

Gosling: Yeah. Sure. Voluntary. Never mind the fast that half of some of those teams wouldn't even be able to afford to go to college at all if it weren't for football, and if they get booted off the team, they drop out of school basically immediately because they can no longer afford to attend without the scholarship.

Voluntary.


Dexter Manly.
 
2014-01-28 08:06:58 PM  

RickyWilliams'sBong: cookiefleck: Well, it's not so much "ignorance" as "reality" in the south. People want to work here and many people from up north have moved here because they find that unions hault everything up north. My dad is actually a union leader in this area in the south, but my mother is the most anti-union person you can find.

Oh, bullshiat.  Middle-aged and old people move here because the weather's nicer and their savings goes farther.

And Texas is not part of the South.


Well, if you talk to anyone from Michigan or New York, they consider it the south. And I'm not talking about people in that retiring age, I'm talking about the people that are still considered viable work force. Other people like to move here because of property value and generally high school ratings.
 
2014-01-28 08:07:09 PM  

Troy McClure: I'm no fan of unions, but go go gadget student unions.  fark the NCAA!


I'm a big fan of unions, but this isn't an instance where one should exist.  The students aren't employees.  They already receive compensation in the form of their scholarship, and no one is forcing them to accept the deal if they don't want it.

I wouldn't have a problem with an actual minor-league football system akin to minor league baseball or the NBA's D-league, and in that case the players would be professional instead of amateurs and I'd have no issue with unionization.
 
2014-01-28 08:07:39 PM  

Dafatone: You mean what already happens in classes at not all but many football schools?


No need to qualify that with "football".

/people show up drunk or skip class all the time and it's more often than not not the athletes
//then again, I have you farkied as a Cornellian so there's a bit less of it there.
 
2014-01-28 08:10:08 PM  

iamdonovan: ytterbium: How many actually get drafted firect to NFL from HS?

None. The NFL has a rule against it.


I know they can't be drafted until they've been out of high school for three years. Can they still skip the draft and sign with a team?
 
2014-01-28 08:10:30 PM  

iamdonovan: ytterbium: How many actually get drafted firect to NFL from HS?

None. The NFL has a rule against it.


I did not know that.

Spin all of the big Div. I teams into independent for-pay teams and have college club teams for players who also want an education.

I grew up in a big Div. 1 college town and of course the football players aren't expected to be scholars. They're treated like celebs, and it's obvious they have money coming from somewhere. Your average poli-sci major doesn't drive a brand-new convertible Caddy.
 
2014-01-28 08:18:16 PM  

TuteTibiImperes: Troy McClure: I'm no fan of unions, but go go gadget student unions.  fark the NCAA!

I'm a big fan of unions, but this isn't an instance where one should exist.  The students aren't employees.  They already receive compensation in the form of their scholarship, and no one is forcing them to accept the deal if they don't want it.

I wouldn't have a problem with an actual minor-league football system akin to minor league baseball or the NBA's D-league, and in that case the players would be professional instead of amateurs and I'd have no issue with unionization.


I see it this way;  would the school have nearly as much money coming in if the students that are spectacular athletes ceased to exist? Without them, who would care about Auburn? Who would care about Oregon? NCAA is a pimp and the athletes are the whores getting banged hard.
 
2014-01-28 08:20:43 PM  

cookiefleck: RickyWilliams'sBong: cookiefleck: Well, it's not so much "ignorance" as "reality" in the south. People want to work here and many people from up north have moved here because they find that unions hault everything up north. My dad is actually a union leader in this area in the south, but my mother is the most anti-union person you can find.

Oh, bullshiat.   Middle-aged and old people move here because the weather's nicer and their savings goes farther.

And Texas is not part of the South.

Well, if you talk to anyone from Michigan or New York, they consider it the south. And I'm not talking about people in that retiring age, I'm talking about the people that are still considered viable work force. Other people like to move here because of property value and generally high school ratings.


Yay, reading.

That's not my experience with Michiganders and New Yorkers, but that seems irrelevant to me.  The South hates Texas almost as much as the North.

Also, on the school ratings -- lulz.
 
2014-01-28 08:21:35 PM  

rugman11: Jragghen: If you read the reasons behind why the students are trying to organize, it's actually not about getting paid as in salary: it's about being able to cover injuries which are sustained from playing football which may not materialize until after graduation, when they're no longer covered by the school's health plan (as well as a few other things, such as trying to even out the discrepancy where red-shirt freshmen get a 5th year of school paid for, while true freshmen have no such opportunity to get their first year of grad school paid for my scholarship).

Now, that being said, part of the reason the NCAA will fight this tooth and nail is because once it's established that there IS a union, things like getting pay will become more probable in the future. But that's not what this is about at all.

The most interesting thing out of this so far is that the NFLPA is supporting the students. If the NFLPA were willing to strike in solidarity, I wonder what would happen....

So it's about CTE and other brain injuries then?


That's what it appears to be, yeah. You can see a post from one of the Northwestern players (in a throwaway, supposedly) over on reddit:

http://www.reddit.com/r/CFB/comments/1wdhsg/northwestern_wildcats_fo ot ball_players_trying_to/cf0z0de

Fark doesn't appear to have had a thread about the players' claims, the link we've got here is straight to the rebuttal. Here's the pertinent information from the original article:

"Huma said the goals of CAPA is the same as the NCPA. The group has pressed for better concussion and other medical protections, and for scholarships to cover the full cost of attendance.
Having already successfully advocated for the creation of multiyear scholarships, it now would like those scholarships to be guaranteed even if a player is no longer able to continue for injury or medical reasons.
"It's become clear that relying on NCAA policymakers won't work, that they are never going to protect college athletes, and you can see that with their actions over the past decade," Huma said. "Look at their position on concussions. They say they have no legal obligation to protect players."
CAPA's initial goals do not include a call for schools to pay salaries."
 
2014-01-28 08:27:56 PM  

RickyWilliams'sBong: cookiefleck: RickyWilliams'sBong: cookiefleck: Well, it's not so much "ignorance" as "reality" in the south. People want to work here and many people from up north have moved here because they find that unions hault everything up north. My dad is actually a union leader in this area in the south, but my mother is the most anti-union person you can find.

Oh, bullshiat.   Middle-aged and old people move here because the weather's nicer and their savings goes farther.

And Texas is not part of the South.

Well, if you talk to anyone from Michigan or New York, they consider it the south. And I'm not talking about people in that retiring age, I'm talking about the people that are still considered viable work force. Other people like to move here because of property value and generally high school ratings.

Yay, reading.

That's not my experience with Michiganders and New Yorkers, but that seems irrelevant to me.  The South hates Texas almost as much as the North.

Also, on the school ratings -- lulz.


Really? Um okay. And in regards to school ratings, the suburbs around here have amazing teachers hired from ivy league schools teaching. My English teacher in my little Podunk town graduated from Harvard and my health teacher was a Berkeley graduate.
 
2014-01-28 08:28:15 PM  
Side note: scholarship athletes are already paid, and I'm not taking about their scholarships. They get a check (well, direct deposit) from the school on a regular basis that they can spend on whatever they want. They've been doing this pretty much forever. They call it a "housing allotment" but it's cash they can spend on whatever they want.
 
2014-01-28 08:28:16 PM  

cookiefleck: TuteTibiImperes: Troy McClure: I'm no fan of unions, but go go gadget student unions.  fark the NCAA!

I'm a big fan of unions, but this isn't an instance where one should exist.  The students aren't employees.  They already receive compensation in the form of their scholarship, and no one is forcing them to accept the deal if they don't want it.

I wouldn't have a problem with an actual minor-league football system akin to minor league baseball or the NBA's D-league, and in that case the players would be professional instead of amateurs and I'd have no issue with unionization.

I see it this way;  would the school have nearly as much money coming in if the students that are spectacular athletes ceased to exist? Without them, who would care about Auburn? Who would care about Oregon? NCAA is a pimp and the athletes are the whores getting banged hard.


The student athletes get tuition, room and board payed for, coaching and development to improve their skill, and exposure on the national stage.  Plus, for the majority, they get a chance to play a game they enjoy.

Most won't make it to the pros, and most know that.  For the majority of them getting a free education for playing a game is a hell of a deal.

In academic fields PhD track students do a lot of the research grunt work that leads to big papers and discoveries that bring renown to the school, and they aren't getting paid either.

It's less of an issue for sports other than football because there is no minor league associated with the NFL, however there's no waiting period requirement for the arena league, and I don't believe there is one for the CFL either, so there are some options.
 
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