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(The New York Times)   Today's Rocky and Bullwinkle headline: Age appropriate chores OR How to make your child a slave   (parenting.blogs.nytimes.com) divider line 82
    More: Interesting, Bullwinkle, Montessori school, home repairs  
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3776 clicks; posted to Main » on 28 Jan 2014 at 1:19 PM (38 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



82 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-01-28 01:20:55 PM  
I thought that 50% of the benefit of having kids was indentured servitude.

What's the problem?
 
2014-01-28 01:21:27 PM  
How is asking all family members to contribute to running the house slavery?
 
2014-01-28 01:21:27 PM  
Is subby from the school of liberalism that teaches all work is bad or something? Chores are good for children.
 
2014-01-28 01:22:29 PM  

MyRandomName: Is subby from the school of liberalism that teaches all work is bad or something? Chores are good for children.


Chores are good for kids. Not only do they contribute to the household as they are able, it teaches them how to be competent adults.

They are family members, not house guests.
 
2014-01-28 01:23:00 PM  
This just in: Fully 3/4 of the people at my office have no idea who Rocky and Bullwinkle were.

I'm officially old.

Hold me.
 
2014-01-28 01:23:10 PM  
How are kids supposed to grow up to feel entitled if they have to do things for themselves?
 
2014-01-28 01:23:42 PM  

SordidEuphemism: This just in: Fully 3/4 of the people at my office have no idea who Rocky and Bullwinkle were.

I'm officially old.

Hold me.



Eww old person smell.
 
2014-01-28 01:24:01 PM  
Frecking Fark...my wife actually has this on the Fridge.

/4 year old and 11 month old...GET A JERB!!!
 
2014-01-28 01:24:11 PM  
Helping to take care of yourself isn't slavery. Demanding that someone else take care of you is.
 
2014-01-28 01:26:26 PM  
I seem to be often subjected to, when at the grocery store, the slowest people in front of me in the aisle's as well as when waiting in line. It's when in the aisle's that I often seem to be behind older folks who use their grocery carts as walkers, arms folded and leaning across the hand-rest. And they are slow. Naturally, I know this helps support them (especially the older folks) but it is a nuisance just the same mainly because these people are painfully slow. Slow as sloths for the most part. Add to that the fact that they generally push their carts in the middle of the aisle---rather than at the right/left sides as traffic should dictate---these people are veritable roadblocks. And annoying. I do my best to skirt around them but it's not always easy to do. More often than not I find myself having to backtrack the aisle to get to the next aisle; this, of course, puts a damper on my own shopping experience which typically involves alternating aisle/travel-direction. This sort of inconvenience is intensified if I happen to be behind one of these "aisle blockers" at the checkout line. This sort of shopper will typically pay with cash and coinage (counting out each nickel verrrry slowly) or painstakingly write a check (making sure to make the exact entry in the checkbook right there rather than wait until they get home). Once this ritual is completed, it's generally followed by the woman---and it's invariably an old woman---organizing her suitcase-sized pocketbook, a task that can take seemingly several minutes. Grrrr....
 
2014-01-28 01:27:01 PM  
Oops....
 
2014-01-28 01:27:32 PM  

SordidEuphemism: This just in: Fully 3/4 of the people at my office have no idea who Rocky and Bullwinkle were.

I'm officially old.

Hold me.


Obviously, you need to take them for a ride in the Way-back Machine.

www.toonopedia.com
 
2014-01-28 01:27:38 PM  

generallyso: SordidEuphemism: This just in: Fully 3/4 of the people at my office have no idea who Rocky and Bullwinkle were.

I'm officially old.

Hold me.


Eww old person smell.


 content.artofmanliness.com   www.southernsavers.com
 
2014-01-28 01:28:16 PM  
A 3 year old can set the table?

No thanks, I don't want to drink out of a glass they slimed with their kiddie fluids.
 
2014-01-28 01:28:25 PM  

debug: I thought that 50% of the benefit of having kids was indentured servitude.

What's the problem?


Growing up in my Dad's house it was.
 
2014-01-28 01:28:42 PM  
I hate folks who make their kids retreive things for them regularly.

"Hey Lil Jimmie, go get that remote. Go get me something to drink. Go get my cell phone. Go get the chips out of the pantry and bring them to me. Go get me another piece of cake..."

Nothing wrong with getting the kids to assist you sometimes, but they're not dogs and they weren't born to serve you.


/Get off of your lazy ass
 
2014-01-28 01:29:04 PM  

ChipNASA: generallyso: SordidEuphemism: This just in: Fully 3/4 of the people at my office have no idea who Rocky and Bullwinkle were.

I'm officially old.

Hold me.


Eww old person smell.

 [content.artofmanliness.com image 291x511]   [www.southernsavers.com image 590x443]


You forgot the urine and BO.
 
2014-01-28 01:29:32 PM  
You'd be surprised how many people don't have their children do anything around the house. Kids and the disgusting animals people just HAVE to have in their house is keeping me in business, so please carry on.
 
d23 [TotalFark]
2014-01-28 01:30:10 PM  
www.danielevanweiss.com
 
2014-01-28 01:30:48 PM  
Kids should be given chores and they can earn an allowance. this teaches them the value of work and wages before they can even get a job. Which is important.
I always worked as a kid, and earned every penny of my allowance, which was pretty small, compared to the wealthy kids who just got handed money.
I learned how to pay my own way, pay my own bills, and always have a job.
Every single employer has told me they loved my work ethic.
 
2014-01-28 01:30:58 PM  

Mell of a Hess: debug: I thought that 50% of the benefit of having kids was indentured servitude.

What's the problem?

Growing up in my Dad's house it was.


Uh oh. Unresolved issues bubbling to the surface. So, he was a real prick, huh?
 
2014-01-28 01:31:18 PM  

Mell of a Hess: SordidEuphemism: This just in: Fully 3/4 of the people at my office have no idea who Rocky and Bullwinkle were.

I'm officially old.

Hold me.

Obviously, you need to take them for a ride in the Way-back Machine.

[www.toonopedia.com image 300x221]


I have simultaneous high hopes and deep dread for the upcoming movie.
 
2014-01-28 01:31:42 PM  

DROxINxTHExWIND: I hate folks who make their kids retreive things for them regularly.

"Hey Lil Jimmie, go get that remote. Go get me something to drink. Go get my cell phone. Go get the chips out of the pantry and bring them to me. Go get me another piece of cake..."

Nothing wrong with getting the kids to assist you sometimes, but they're not dogs and they weren't born to serve you.


/Get off of your lazy ass


Yeah, Dad was a "Step-n-Fetch IT" kind of g ... Hey, sorry.
 
2014-01-28 01:31:47 PM  
i512.photobucket.com
 
d23 [TotalFark]
2014-01-28 01:31:48 PM  

vudukungfu: Kids should be given chores and they can earn an allowance. this teaches them the value of work and wages before they can even get a job. Which is important.


It's important in corporate-controlled world to learn how to do near-meaningless tasks for below minimum wage.
 
2014-01-28 01:32:02 PM  

SordidEuphemism: This just in: Fully 3/4 of the people at my office have no idea who Rocky and Bullwinkle were.

I'm officially old.

Hold me.


Well, the movie was so bad it erased memories. It's not just your age.
 
2014-01-28 01:33:44 PM  

MelGoesOnTour: I seem to be often subjected to, when at the grocery store, the slowest people in front of me in the aisle's as well as when waiting in line. It's when in the aisle's that I often seem to be behind older folks who use their grocery carts as walkers, arms folded and leaning across the hand-rest. And they are slow. Naturally, I know this helps support them (especially the older folks) but it is a nuisance just the same mainly because these people are painfully slow. Slow as sloths for the most part. Add to that the fact that they generally push their carts in the middle of the aisle---rather than at the right/left sides as traffic should dictate---these people are veritable roadblocks. And annoying. I do my best to skirt around them but it's not always easy to do. More often than not I find myself having to backtrack the aisle to get to the next aisle; this, of course, puts a damper on my own shopping experience which typically involves alternating aisle/travel-direction.


I usually just say "pardon me" and smile which works 100% of the time.

But you've clearly got a system, so good on you.
 
2014-01-28 01:34:17 PM  

DROxINxTHExWIND: I hate folks who make their kids retreive things for them regularly.

"Hey Lil Jimmie, go get that remote. Go get me something to drink. Go get my cell phone. Go get the chips out of the pantry and bring them to me. Go get me another piece of cake..."

Nothing wrong with getting the kids to assist you sometimes, but they're not dogs and they weren't born to serve you.


/Get off of your lazy ass


So much this.

What they are teaching is "get someone else that you can order around on a whim", not "do the following things regularly in order to have a safe, healthy, and comfortable home"
 
2014-01-28 01:34:30 PM  

DROxINxTHExWIND: Mell of a Hess: debug: I thought that 50% of the benefit of having kids was indentured servitude.

What's the problem?

Growing up in my Dad's house it was.

Uh oh. Unresolved issues bubbling to the surface. So, he was a real prick, huh?


Still is.
 
2014-01-28 01:34:56 PM  

d23: vudukungfu: Kids should be given chores and they can earn an allowance. this teaches them the value of work and wages before they can even get a job. Which is important.

It's important in corporate-controlled world to learn how to do near-meaningless tasks for below minimum wage.


If the tasks are meaningless why would anyone want to pay much to have them done?
 
2014-01-28 01:35:36 PM  

ChipNASA: Frecking Fark...my wife actually has this on the Fridge.

/4 year old and 11 month old...GET A JERB!!!


So maybe you can verify, but it seems to me that the list is more along the lines of "here are things that kids should be capable of doing at these ages" rather than "here are the things your kids should be doing on a regular basis at these ages".

And I find it a bit weird that they rank matching clean socks as more complex than sorting flatware, using a vacuum cleaner or setting the table.
 
2014-01-28 01:36:07 PM  

MelGoesOnTour: I seem to be often subjected to, when at the grocery store, the slowest people in front of me in the aisle's as well as when waiting in line. It's when in the aisle's that I often seem to be behind older folks who use their grocery carts as walkers, arms folded and leaning across the hand-rest. And they are slow. Naturally, I know this helps support them (especially the older folks) but it is a nuisance just the same mainly because these people are painfully slow. Slow as sloths for the most part. Add to that the fact that they generally push their carts in the middle of the aisle---rather than at the right/left sides as traffic should dictate---these people are veritable roadblocks. And annoying. I do my best to skirt around them but it's not always easy to do. More often than not I find myself having to backtrack the aisle to get to the next aisle; this, of course, puts a damper on my own shopping experience which typically involves alternating aisle/travel-direction. This sort of inconvenience is intensified if I happen to be behind one of these "aisle blockers" at the checkout line. This sort of shopper will typically pay with cash and coinage (counting out each nickel verrrry slowly) or painstakingly write a check (making sure to make the exact entry in the checkbook right there rather than wait until they get home). Once this ritual is completed, it's generally followed by the woman---and it's invariably an old woman---organizing her suitcase-sized pocketbook, a task that can take seemingly several minutes. Grrrr....


What you need to do is be in their way. Ignore them entirely until they touch or nudge you then turn around make hand gestures and sound out words.
 
2014-01-28 01:36:10 PM  
I hate the term "chores" for routine housework. There are a few things I consider a "chore", such as cleaning the shower, but they are not chores per se but rather stuff that needs to be done. Washing clothes is dead simple and requires no real work now that washing machines exist. Cooking is (or should be) fun and rewarding. Washing dishes is what you do because you don't want filthy dishes and disgusting pests.

Thankfully, I live in an apartment and don't have yard work, but if I did have a yard it would be a garden because fark lawns.

Kids don't do them because they don't care about that stuff. I didn't care if the leaves were raked up or if the lawn was cut, or if my clothes were wrinkly. As an adult I fold even my gym clothes, mostly so they fit in the drawer but still.
 
2014-01-28 01:36:21 PM  
How is a 12  year old going to shop for groceries, even with a list?
 
2014-01-28 01:37:07 PM  

d23: vudukungfu: Kids should be given chores and they can earn an allowance. this teaches them the value of work and wages before they can even get a job. Which is important.

It's important in corporate-controlled world to learn how to do near-meaningless tasks for below minimum wage.


Occam'd, but I see your point. Hope you see mine. Whether the world is corporate controlled, or the wages are lower than they should be, chores are the first "jobs" we have. The conditioning needs to happen for future security.
 
2014-01-28 01:39:52 PM  

d23: vudukungfu: Kids should be given chores and they can earn an allowance. this teaches them the value of work and wages before they can even get a job. Which is important.

It's important in corporate-controlled world to learn how to do near-meaningless tasks for below minimum wage.


Sucks to not have any kind of useful skills.  Perhaps by doing chores kids will learn the value of not being useless, easily manipulated slaves
 
2014-01-28 01:39:54 PM  
I didn't have many chores growing up and realize that it made me a less capable adult for a while until I learned to all the things that were done for me - laundry, cleaning the bathroom, vacuuming/mopping, cleaning the kitchen counters after cooking, etc.

I did do dishes enough that I had that down.

Chores aren't just division of labor (which is a legitimate concept, IMO), but is also an aspect of life skills training.  There are concepts like organization, basic reasoning, conservation, etc. that come from cleaning up after one's self and taking care of one's things.

If your teen has to do their own laundry or pay for their own dry cleaning, that might factor a little into their clothing choices.   They may also learn/reinforce basic organization - separating delicates, colors, etc.
If your kid has to clean their bathroom, they might be a little more tidy in their use of it (or less likely to trash it).  If they have to keep their (whole) room vacuumed, they may be less likely to leave stuff on the floor or be flippant about things like crumbs, scraps of paper or that random small debris that always litters my floors between vacuumings.

For fark's sake, get them cooking.  Every person by 11 or 12 year old should know how to follow a recipe for all the but the most complicated things.  You've succeeded if your kid can handle at least half of Thanksgiving dinner for a household.  Roasting a turkey, making stuffing, chopping vegetables, making pan gravy, etc are not difficult with a little planning.
 
2014-01-28 01:39:57 PM  
But that trick never works!
 
2014-01-28 01:40:30 PM  

robbiex0r: How is a 12  year old going to shop for groceries, even with a list?


Easy to do before urban sprawl made it impossible without driving.
 
2014-01-28 01:42:37 PM  

robbiex0r: How is a 12  year old going to shop for groceries, even with a list?


give them cash or debit card and send them in.  It's DEAD simple.
 
2014-01-28 01:43:03 PM  
"Meanwhile back at the ranch, Bullwinkle disguised as a door got his knob shot off!"
 
2014-01-28 01:45:40 PM  
It's more of a chore to remind young kids (7 and under) to do their chores.  They (purposefully) never remember.   I have an 11 year old who earns money, or doesn't, by the jobs she has - putting away dishwasher dishes, doing her own laundry, clearing the dinner table, one or two others.   I have a 5 year old who I tried to teach to make his bed, and the results were such that I just did it myself every day anyway.  So he just has to keep his own toys and room clean.   This ain't no country club - you wanna eat and have clothes and toys and get driven to various birthday parties etc?  You gotta work.
 
2014-01-28 01:49:08 PM  

wildcardjack: SordidEuphemism: This just in: Fully 3/4 of the people at my office have no idea who Rocky and Bullwinkle were.

I'm officially old.

Hold me.

Well, the movie was so bad it erased memories. It's not just your age.


True dat. Although you can buy each season separately or all five seasons in a boxed set for a very reasonable price and enjoy some of the finest comic timing, sly satire, and camp humour ever.

Maybe the people in your office are just really, really stupid people. What's wrong with kids nowadays if they don't love Rocky & Bullwinkle? George of the Jungle? Super-Chicken?

It's practically an IQ test, like giving a cashier twelve cans of soda arranged in a rectangle and seeing how long it takes her to count them.

Low IQ: counts one by one
Medium IQ: counts by threes or fours
Higher IQ: Multiplies 3 x 4 and gets 12.
Highest IQ: looks at rectangle and thinks "a dozen cans".

That's my IQ Test for Cashiers.

Maybe you should start wearing a Rocky & Bullwinkle sweat shirt on casual Fridays, if they allow t-shirts. Rocky & Bullwinkle is one of the few classic cartoons that wasn't ruined by going from theatric release to crappy television versions. As MAD magazine might put it, it started out as crappy television--with wit and humour and clever jibes at media, politics and popular culture.
 
2014-01-28 01:50:40 PM  

robbiex0r: How is a 12  year old going to shop for groceries, even with a list?


My son will be 11 next month. He can read. He can add and subtract. He has a basic understanding of units of measure. And he knows about how much the things we regularly buy should cost. I don't know why a 12 year old would have difficulty with those things. Hell, my son came running up to the cart last week with two extra bags of goldfish (they're like crack to him) because they were on sale.
 
2014-01-28 01:52:49 PM  

robbiex0r: How is a 12  year old going to shop for groceries, even with a list?


??
Walk or bike to store.
Put items in basket.
Pay cash for items.
Walk or bike home.
 
2014-01-28 01:53:32 PM  

MyRandomName: Is subby from the school of liberalism that teaches all work is bad or something? Chores are good for children.


I was going to say this. Chores teach important life lessons such as distrusting the Man, incredulity when people tell you something is good for you or unpleasant but necessary, and sub-delegating stupid busy work and crap jobs to younger or weaker people.

If you don't have to do chores as a child, you may grow up a socialist minion. With choress, you may grow up to be a Commissar or even the next Stalin.

Thanks to having to work as a child, I strenuously avoid all but the most necessary house work even unto this day. And I am a genius at finding ways to make work easier or altogether redundant. I've worked my way out of hundreds of jobs in record time.
 
2014-01-28 01:54:18 PM  

MelGoesOnTour: I seem to be often subjected to, when at the grocery store, the slowest people in front of me in the aisle's as well as when waiting in line. It's when in the aisle's that I often seem to be behind older folks who use their grocery carts as walkers, arms folded and leaning across the hand-rest. And they are slow. Naturally, I know this helps support them (especially the older folks) but it is a nuisance just the same mainly because these people are painfully slow. Slow as sloths for the most part. Add to that the fact that they generally push their carts in the middle of the aisle---rather than at the right/left sides as traffic should dictate---these people are veritable roadblocks. And annoying. I do my best to skirt around them but it's not always easy to do. More often than not I find myself having to backtrack the aisle to get to the next aisle; this, of course, puts a damper on my own shopping experience which typically involves alternating aisle/travel-direction. This sort of inconvenience is intensified if I happen to be behind one of these "aisle blockers" at the checkout line. This sort of shopper will typically pay with cash and coinage (counting out each nickel verrrry slowly) or painstakingly write a check (making sure to make the exact entry in the checkbook right there rather than wait until they get home). Once this ritual is completed, it's generally followed by the woman---and it's invariably an old woman---organizing her suitcase-sized pocketbook, a task that can take seemingly several minutes. Grrrr....


CSB, but what does it have to do with  the linked article of making children do chores?
 
2014-01-28 01:55:53 PM  
I keep telling the wife we need to have a kid so we have less stuff to do around the house.
 
2014-01-28 01:56:11 PM  
I like how some of the comments on the Facebook picture are "But cooking is dangerous for a 10 year old!" Really? By 10 I was making roasts and soups unsupervised (yes I know, easy meals, but still legitimate cooking). I never cut myself with a knife or burned myself until I became a boozy adult. 10 year olds aren't incompetent. Quit coddling your kids.
 
2014-01-28 01:56:37 PM  

MelGoesOnTour: I seem to be often subjected to, when at the grocery store, the slowest people in front of me in the aisle's as well as when waiting in line. It's when in the aisle's that I often seem to be behind older folks who use their grocery carts as walkers, arms folded and leaning across the hand-rest. And they are slow. Naturally, I know this helps support them (especially the older folks) but it is a nuisance just the same mainly because these people are painfully slow. Slow as sloths for the most part. Add to that the fact that they generally push their carts in the middle of the aisle---rather than at the right/left sides as traffic should dictate---these people are veritable roadblocks. And annoying. I do my best to skirt around them but it's not always easy to do. More often than not I find myself having to backtrack the aisle to get to the next aisle; this, of course, puts a damper on my own shopping experience which typically involves alternating aisle/travel-direction. This sort of inconvenience is intensified if I happen to be behind one of these "aisle blockers" at the checkout line. This sort of shopper will typically pay with cash and coinage (counting out each nickel verrrry slowly) or painstakingly write a check (making sure to make the exact entry in the checkbook right there rather than wait until they get home). Once this ritual is completed, it's generally followed by the woman---and it's invariably an old woman---organizing her suitcase-sized pocketbook, a task that can take seemingly several minutes. Grrrr....


That's called life, my man.
 
2014-01-28 02:01:47 PM  
My father started me on the lawnmower when I was tall enough to see over the handle (around 7 or 8 I think). I mowed a big front yard and a freaking football field in the back, by hand, until I was 12. That is when dad got a riding lawnmower. Suddenly, he did not need my help. He would sit there with a Jim and Mello Yello in his hand and ride around the yard for hours (usually because he did not want to be bothered with anything else like raising kids, helping his wife with all the rest of the chores, making sure she felt loved and cared for, you know little things like that). In fact, I was told I could NOT use the riding mower for anything! (still had to use the pushmower for the trim and edges of course). I was not too upset about this, because it was not long after this that he found a Honda XR-50 for myself and my 9 yo brother to ride around on.

/of course, the worst accident ever on that bike was... dad... who ran into a 'horse' wire over the main entrance to the farm... after he had pushed it up and ridden under it to get out into the pastures. I laughed for many a night after that little scene. Never where he could hear me of course.
 
2014-01-28 02:03:07 PM  

FrancoFile: DROxINxTHExWIND: I hate folks who make their kids retreive things for them regularly.

"Hey Lil Jimmie, go get that remote. Go get me something to drink. Go get my cell phone. Go get the chips out of the pantry and bring them to me. Go get me another piece of cake..."

Nothing wrong with getting the kids to assist you sometimes, but they're not dogs and they weren't born to serve you.


/Get off of your lazy ass

So much this.

What they are teaching is "get someone else that you can order around on a whim", not "do the following things regularly in order to have a safe, healthy, and comfortable home"


Or they learn to be doormats. Not good either way.
 
2014-01-28 02:05:15 PM  
Every Farker/Farkette who doesn't have kids. GTFO!
 
2014-01-28 02:13:23 PM  

nunyadang: MelGoesOnTour: I seem to be often subjected to, when at the grocery store, the slowest people in front of me in the aisle's as well as when waiting in line. It's when in the aisle's that I often seem to be behind older folks who use their grocery carts as walkers, arms folded and leaning across the hand-rest. And they are slow. Naturally, I know this helps support them (especially the older folks) but it is a nuisance just the same mainly because these people are painfully slow. Slow as sloths for the most part. Add to that the fact that they generally push their carts in the middle of the aisle---rather than at the right/left sides as traffic should dictate---these people are veritable roadblocks. And annoying. I do my best to skirt around them but it's not always easy to do. More often than not I find myself having to backtrack the aisle to get to the next aisle; this, of course, puts a damper on my own shopping experience which typically involves alternating aisle/travel-direction. This sort of inconvenience is intensified if I happen to be behind one of these "aisle blockers" at the checkout line. This sort of shopper will typically pay with cash and coinage (counting out each nickel verrrry slowly) or painstakingly write a check (making sure to make the exact entry in the checkbook right there rather than wait until they get home). Once this ritual is completed, it's generally followed by the woman---and it's invariably an old woman---organizing her suitcase-sized pocketbook, a task that can take seemingly several minutes. Grrrr....

CSB, but what does it have to do with  the linked article of making children do chores?


Well, it's kind of pasting what you forgot you copied....*cough*
 
2014-01-28 02:14:05 PM  

jiggitysmith: I keep telling the wife we need to have a kid so we have less stuff to do around the house.


I don't get it.  I thought everyone's kids were born 4 months after the wedding.
 
2014-01-28 02:16:55 PM  
I did all of those things by the time I was 12, except for the weird ones (disinfect doorknobs? WTF?). I also milked a cow, fed chickens and gathered their eggs, fed hogs, hoed corn, hauled hay, etc. I went to 4-H camp and learned that most of the other boys in the small-engine repair class mowed the lawn at home (my dad handled that when I was 10, but within three years I was running the riding mower). I didn't get an allowance after age 12 (it had been a pittance, like 50 cents a week), but I got paid $3 an hour to do extra work beyond my normal chores, like tilling the garden or building fences.

I'm not sure how useful chores are to "building character," but it is enjoyable to be able to do pretty much anything with your hands that you need to. Cleaning is for the birds, though; I hated it when I was a kid, and I avoid it whenever possible now. If I had the money, I'd hire people to do all of it.
 
2014-01-28 02:17:00 PM  

vudukungfu: Kids should be given chores and they can earn an allowance. this teaches them the value of work and wages before they can even get a job. Which is important.
I always worked as a kid, and earned every penny of my allowance, which was pretty small, compared to the wealthy kids who just got handed money.
I learned how to pay my own way, pay my own bills, and always have a job.
Every single employer has told me they loved my work ethic.


I always thought Miss Manners' take on this was interesting.  She believed that (a) kids should receive an allowance commensurate with age, (b) kids should do household work commensurate with age, but (c) the two should NOT be linked, to specifically avoid the idea that one does the basic chores only to get money. If children want to increase their allowance, they can learn to argue for it or offer up more work for the extra money, but the basics should be done regardless of whether the child is getting paid.

In other words, you do chores not to learn a work ethic, but to learn manners and consideration and how to be part of a well-functioning household.  I'm not sure most children would grasp this distinction or if it really is that important, but certainly, people need to learn that, as an adult, you need to know how to keep a house without being paid to do so and possibly to meet someone else's standards.
 
2014-01-28 02:22:28 PM  

payattention: He would sit there with a Jim and Mello Yello in his hand


Jesus, did he have some kind of condition concerning his tastebuds? That's the worst cocktail I've ever heard of in my life.
 
2014-01-28 02:22:53 PM  

hailin: I like how some of the comments on the Facebook picture are "But cooking is dangerous for a 10 year old!" Really? By 10 I was making roasts and soups unsupervised (yes I know, easy meals, but still legitimate cooking). I never cut myself with a knife or burned myself until I became a boozy adult. 10 year olds aren't incompetent. Quit coddling your kids.


This.

I know someone who is 21 and still regularly cuts herself while cutting vegetables. She hasn't died or horribly maimed herself yet so I don't see why a 12 year old would face more danger than that. Just teach the child in a supervised environment and be at hand while (s)he cooks (that is to say: be able to get there within a reasonable time if you hear a scream). The only reason cooking could be dangerous, barring genuine accidents, is because of a lack of experience.

/Touching a hot stove isn't an accident
//Neither is getting cut when running with a knife in hand
 
2014-01-28 02:23:26 PM  

MyRandomName: Is subby from the school of liberalism that teaches all work is bad or something? Chores are good for children.


RTFA
 
2014-01-28 02:25:27 PM  
-or-

How to convince the kid that college is better than dying early on a farm.
 
2014-01-28 02:25:47 PM  

brantgoose: It's practically an IQ test, like giving a cashier twelve cans of soda arranged in a rectangle and seeing how long it takes her to count them.

Low IQ: counts one by one
Medium IQ: counts by threes or fours
Higher IQ: Multiplies 3 x 4 and gets 12.
Highest IQ: looks at rectangle and thinks "a dozen cans".

That's my IQ Test for Cashiers.


Highester IQ: Rings in each can individually making sure to violently jostle each one as they scan it so the asshole who buys a dozen uncased cans of soda just to be a prick gets flat soda.

Really all you need to do is put all your cold/frozen items on the belt first, hand over your reusable bags and see if they manage to get the cold/frozen items into the insulated one.  Most times they don't. Even though the insulated one is the one that doesn't fold up so it's impossible to miss the fact that one of the bags is in fact insulated.
 
2014-01-28 02:28:53 PM  

Anayalator: MyRandomName: Is subby from the school of liberalism that teaches all work is bad or something? Chores are good for children.

RTFA


I did. Your point?
 
2014-01-28 02:30:21 PM  
So I RTFA. This lady needs to relax. So your kids don't do their chores unless they're nagged. That's because cleaning and other drudgery is unimportant. Don't sweat it. The kind of people who have spotless houses at all times (and don't hire people to do it) are usually very, very boring and frequently unpleasant to be around.
 
2014-01-28 02:32:54 PM  

DROxINxTHExWIND: robbiex0r: How is a 12  year old going to shop for groceries, even with a list?

My son will be 11 next month. He can read. He can add and subtract. He has a basic understanding of units of measure. And he knows about how much the things we regularly buy should cost. I don't know why a 12 year old would have difficulty with those things. Hell, my son came running up to the cart last week with two extra bags of goldfish (they're like crack to him) because they were on sale.


www.goldfish-as-pets.com

Your kid has a strange appetite. Does he chew, or swallow them whole?
 
2014-01-28 02:37:08 PM  

Mell of a Hess: SordidEuphemism: This just in: Fully 3/4 of the people at my office have no idea who Rocky and Bullwinkle were.

I'm officially old.

Hold me.

Obviously, you need to take them for a ride in the Way-back Machine.

[www.toonopedia.com image 300x221]


Saw a commercial for the movie they're making of these two. Looks like crap, and the original cartoon was SO off-the-wall great.

/Old.
 
2014-01-28 02:38:27 PM  

DROxINxTHExWIND: I hate folks who make their kids retreive things for them regularly.

"Hey Lil Jimmie, go get that remote. Go get me something to drink. Go get my cell phone. Go get the chips out of the pantry and bring them to me. Go get me another piece of cake..."

Nothing wrong with getting the kids to assist you sometimes, but they're not dogs and they weren't born to serve you.


/Get off of your lazy ass


My monsters are so hyper I'm constantly trying to think of "odd jobs" and whatnot they could do to keep them out of trouble/unhurt for just two frickin' minutes....
 
2014-01-28 02:42:01 PM  
mbillips - Jesus, did he have some kind of condition concerning his tastebuds? That's the worst cocktail I've ever heard of in my life.

Tell me about it! However, it was his drink of choice until he 'quit drinking'.

/which meant he switched to beer all the time, instead of hard liquor...
//my bro tells me he is back on the hard stuff now. Of course, he is 71 now and feels he can do whatever he wants.
///we don't give him long to be honest
 
2014-01-28 02:55:34 PM  
"SordidEuphemism
This just in: Fully 3/4 of the people at my office have no idea who Rocky and Bullwinkle were."

Obama & Biden, only who is which????? Just kidding, don't want to insult Rocky & Bullwinkle that way.
 
2014-01-28 02:56:10 PM  
I was recently visiting my parents and siblings, and they kept taking the serrated butter knives away from my two year old. We've been teaching her how to use knives, so I kept telling them to give the knives back. It's not like she can cut off a finger with those things.

She's also been emptying the dishwasher since 15 months old (she puts dishes that go in an upper cabinet on the counter below the correct cabinet), she feeds the cats, throws out trash, fetches diapers/wipes/baby stuff for her little brother, sets the table, puts dirty clothes in hamper, clears the table. She loves to do all these things but for the life of me I can't figure out how to get her to pick up her toys and clean up the playroom or her bedroom. I don't get it. Anyone have tips? She is at the age that she loves to help, but just not with cleaning up her play area.

I can't wait to teach her how to sweep, mop, and vacuum effectively. Right now she just pushes the dirt around with the broom and the vacuum is too big for her.
 
2014-01-28 03:09:45 PM  
No objection to kids doing chores, but 2-3 seems a little young for hauling firewood.  I was five or six when I started, but was probably not much use at it for another couple years.

Got VERY good at laying fires in the fireplace though.
 
2014-01-28 03:11:21 PM  

Ashlea: She loves to do all these things but for the life of me I can't figure out how to get her to pick up her toys and clean up the playroom or her bedroom. I don't get it. Anyone have tips? She is at the age that she loves to help, but just not with cleaning up her play area.


I was going to just link to the song, but a video of a kid actually doing what I'm talking about is so much better. There was another song that my kids learned from preschool which they used to sing to themselves while cleaning up, then Daniel Tiger's little ditty took over and they sing that one now. It makes sense why it works, sailors knew this too.
 
2014-01-28 03:12:59 PM  

SordidEuphemism: This just in: Fully 3/4 of the people at my office have no idea who Rocky and Bullwinkle were.
I'm officially old.


No. You are not old, your office is just lame. I hate the lazy excuse "oh, well that was before my time so I don't what that is." Groucho Marx was before my time but I know who he is. Just like I know what a steam locomotive is.

I truly believe most people who say "I don't know what such-and-such is" are just d-bags who are trying to look cool.

/tell them i said so
 
2014-01-28 03:21:22 PM  

MyRandomName: Anayalator: MyRandomName: Is subby from the school of liberalism that teaches all work is bad or something? Chores are good for children.

RTFA

I did. Your point?


Neither the headline nor the article align with your misguided assumption. In fact, the headline is an either/or statement.

I think the point is pretty clear. My suggestion that you read the article was, admittedly, also a misguided assumption. I figured that, if the headline did not offer sufficient explanation, you could not have possibly read the article and still misunderstood. My mistake.

I am curious, though...what, from either the article or the headline, led you to assume anything about the submitter?
 
2014-01-28 03:26:58 PM  

2wolves: -or-

How to convince the kid that college is better than dying early on a farm.



Truth. I worked the sand valve while my Dad sandblasted every summer. It was hot, dirty, and sometimes difficult.

"This is why you need to go to college, Boy! So you don't have to do this for the rest of your life."

I'm not complaining at all. I'm grateful for the lesson.
 
2014-01-28 03:38:16 PM  

brantgoose: wildcardjack: SordidEuphemism: This just in: Fully 3/4 of the people at my office have no idea who Rocky and Bullwinkle were.

I'm officially old.

Hold me.

Well, the movie was so bad it erased memories. It's not just your age.

True dat. Although you can buy each season separately or all five seasons in a boxed set for a very reasonable price and enjoy some of the finest comic timing, sly satire, and camp humour ever.

Maybe the people in your office are just really, really stupid people. What's wrong with kids nowadays if they don't love Rocky & Bullwinkle? George of the Jungle? Super-Chicken?

It's practically an IQ test, like giving a cashier twelve cans of soda arranged in a rectangle and seeing how long it takes her to count them.

Low IQ: counts one by one
Medium IQ: counts by threes or fours
Higher IQ: Multiplies 3 x 4 and gets 12.
Highest IQ: looks at rectangle and thinks "a dozen cans".

That's my IQ Test for Cashiers.

Maybe you should start wearing a Rocky & Bullwinkle sweat shirt on casual Fridays, if they allow t-shirts. Rocky & Bullwinkle is one of the few classic cartoons that wasn't ruined by going from theatric release to crappy television versions. As MAD magazine might put it, it started out as crappy television--with wit and humour and clever jibes at media, politics and popular culture.


Are you recruiting for some kind of cashier based think tank, or are you just a dick?
 
2014-01-28 04:00:36 PM  

Snakeophelia: I always thought Miss Manners' take on this was interesting


Well, my dad grew up under a single mother and with a brother who had polio in the depression so he didn't read a lot of Miss Manners.
 
2014-01-28 04:35:06 PM  

Ashlea: I was recently visiting my parents and siblings, and they kept taking the serrated butter knives away from my two year old. We've been teaching her how to use knives, so I kept telling them to give the knives back. It's not like she can cut off a finger with those things.

She's also been emptying the dishwasher since 15 months old (she puts dishes that go in an upper cabinet on the counter below the correct cabinet), she feeds the cats, throws out trash, fetches diapers/wipes/baby stuff for her little brother, sets the table, puts dirty clothes in hamper, clears the table. She loves to do all these things but for the life of me I can't figure out how to get her to pick up her toys and clean up the playroom or her bedroom. I don't get it. Anyone have tips? She is at the age that she loves to help, but just not with cleaning up her play area.

I can't wait to teach her how to sweep, mop, and vacuum effectively. Right now she just pushes the dirt around with the broom and the vacuum is too big for her.


I'd guess there's an internal reward for her for doing 'grown up jobs'.  How/where she got that idea I dunno. Maybe you implied she was doing a grown-up's task? Or maybe just observation. Or maybe she feels better helping you, whereas picking up her toys is her responsibility. Kind of like doing the dishes at a host's house is no big deal, but doing your own is a miserable chore.

Somehow show her the value in a neat and tidy workspace?
 
2014-01-28 06:00:17 PM  
http://youtu.be/Jz6yYQaAeGU

Yes, I read that headline with William Conrad's voice.
 
2014-01-28 06:18:16 PM  

Anayalator: MyRandomName: Is subby from the school of liberalism that teaches all work is bad or something? Chores are good for children.

RTFA


He's from the school of conservatism that teaches reading is bad or something...
 
2014-01-28 08:18:56 PM  
My kids have chores.  The 8 year old is to unload the dishwasher before bed, the 5 year old handles putting away the silverware.  And the 8 year old cleans the cat box every third day, taking turns with Daddy and I.  They also have to take care of their own crap, like clearing their plates after dinner and putting their clothes away after they are washed (I fold the 5 year old's and he just puts them in the drawer).  It's good for the kids to have a thing or two to do.  The list isn't recommending they do EVERYTHING there, just that those are things you could choose from.  

Also on board with hating parents that make their kids fetch everything.  I may ask my kid to grab me something from somewhere if he's already on the way there for something else, but my dad used to do that shiat where he would scream for me as though I were in trouble.  I'd run across the house (better yell "I'm coming" if you don't want smacked across the face) only to have him ask me to hand him his shoes that were literally 10 feet away because he didn't want to get off the couch.  Enjoy your diabeetus, you lazy, evil fark.
 
2014-01-30 01:51:59 AM  
OR 'How to teach your children to be competent teenagers and adults"
Subtitle: The easy to follow guide to ensure your children don't end up as Fark headlines.
 
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