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(The New York Times)   Today's Rocky and Bullwinkle headline: Age appropriate chores OR How to make your child a slave   (parenting.blogs.nytimes.com) divider line 82
    More: Interesting, Bullwinkle, Montessori school, home repairs  
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3772 clicks; posted to Main » on 28 Jan 2014 at 1:19 PM (33 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-01-28 01:20:55 PM
I thought that 50% of the benefit of having kids was indentured servitude.

What's the problem?
 
2014-01-28 01:21:27 PM
How is asking all family members to contribute to running the house slavery?
 
2014-01-28 01:21:27 PM
Is subby from the school of liberalism that teaches all work is bad or something? Chores are good for children.
 
2014-01-28 01:22:29 PM

MyRandomName: Is subby from the school of liberalism that teaches all work is bad or something? Chores are good for children.


Chores are good for kids. Not only do they contribute to the household as they are able, it teaches them how to be competent adults.

They are family members, not house guests.
 
2014-01-28 01:23:00 PM
This just in: Fully 3/4 of the people at my office have no idea who Rocky and Bullwinkle were.

I'm officially old.

Hold me.
 
2014-01-28 01:23:10 PM
How are kids supposed to grow up to feel entitled if they have to do things for themselves?
 
2014-01-28 01:23:42 PM

SordidEuphemism: This just in: Fully 3/4 of the people at my office have no idea who Rocky and Bullwinkle were.

I'm officially old.

Hold me.



Eww old person smell.
 
2014-01-28 01:24:01 PM
Frecking Fark...my wife actually has this on the Fridge.

/4 year old and 11 month old...GET A JERB!!!
 
2014-01-28 01:24:11 PM
Helping to take care of yourself isn't slavery. Demanding that someone else take care of you is.
 
2014-01-28 01:26:26 PM
I seem to be often subjected to, when at the grocery store, the slowest people in front of me in the aisle's as well as when waiting in line. It's when in the aisle's that I often seem to be behind older folks who use their grocery carts as walkers, arms folded and leaning across the hand-rest. And they are slow. Naturally, I know this helps support them (especially the older folks) but it is a nuisance just the same mainly because these people are painfully slow. Slow as sloths for the most part. Add to that the fact that they generally push their carts in the middle of the aisle---rather than at the right/left sides as traffic should dictate---these people are veritable roadblocks. And annoying. I do my best to skirt around them but it's not always easy to do. More often than not I find myself having to backtrack the aisle to get to the next aisle; this, of course, puts a damper on my own shopping experience which typically involves alternating aisle/travel-direction. This sort of inconvenience is intensified if I happen to be behind one of these "aisle blockers" at the checkout line. This sort of shopper will typically pay with cash and coinage (counting out each nickel verrrry slowly) or painstakingly write a check (making sure to make the exact entry in the checkbook right there rather than wait until they get home). Once this ritual is completed, it's generally followed by the woman---and it's invariably an old woman---organizing her suitcase-sized pocketbook, a task that can take seemingly several minutes. Grrrr....
 
2014-01-28 01:27:01 PM
Oops....
 
2014-01-28 01:27:32 PM

SordidEuphemism: This just in: Fully 3/4 of the people at my office have no idea who Rocky and Bullwinkle were.

I'm officially old.

Hold me.


Obviously, you need to take them for a ride in the Way-back Machine.

www.toonopedia.com
 
2014-01-28 01:27:38 PM

generallyso: SordidEuphemism: This just in: Fully 3/4 of the people at my office have no idea who Rocky and Bullwinkle were.

I'm officially old.

Hold me.


Eww old person smell.


 content.artofmanliness.com   www.southernsavers.com
 
2014-01-28 01:28:16 PM
A 3 year old can set the table?

No thanks, I don't want to drink out of a glass they slimed with their kiddie fluids.
 
2014-01-28 01:28:25 PM

debug: I thought that 50% of the benefit of having kids was indentured servitude.

What's the problem?


Growing up in my Dad's house it was.
 
2014-01-28 01:28:42 PM
I hate folks who make their kids retreive things for them regularly.

"Hey Lil Jimmie, go get that remote. Go get me something to drink. Go get my cell phone. Go get the chips out of the pantry and bring them to me. Go get me another piece of cake..."

Nothing wrong with getting the kids to assist you sometimes, but they're not dogs and they weren't born to serve you.


/Get off of your lazy ass
 
2014-01-28 01:29:04 PM

ChipNASA: generallyso: SordidEuphemism: This just in: Fully 3/4 of the people at my office have no idea who Rocky and Bullwinkle were.

I'm officially old.

Hold me.


Eww old person smell.

 [content.artofmanliness.com image 291x511]   [www.southernsavers.com image 590x443]


You forgot the urine and BO.
 
2014-01-28 01:29:32 PM
You'd be surprised how many people don't have their children do anything around the house. Kids and the disgusting animals people just HAVE to have in their house is keeping me in business, so please carry on.
 
d23 [TotalFark]
2014-01-28 01:30:10 PM
www.danielevanweiss.com
 
2014-01-28 01:30:48 PM
Kids should be given chores and they can earn an allowance. this teaches them the value of work and wages before they can even get a job. Which is important.
I always worked as a kid, and earned every penny of my allowance, which was pretty small, compared to the wealthy kids who just got handed money.
I learned how to pay my own way, pay my own bills, and always have a job.
Every single employer has told me they loved my work ethic.
 
2014-01-28 01:30:58 PM

Mell of a Hess: debug: I thought that 50% of the benefit of having kids was indentured servitude.

What's the problem?

Growing up in my Dad's house it was.


Uh oh. Unresolved issues bubbling to the surface. So, he was a real prick, huh?
 
2014-01-28 01:31:18 PM

Mell of a Hess: SordidEuphemism: This just in: Fully 3/4 of the people at my office have no idea who Rocky and Bullwinkle were.

I'm officially old.

Hold me.

Obviously, you need to take them for a ride in the Way-back Machine.

[www.toonopedia.com image 300x221]


I have simultaneous high hopes and deep dread for the upcoming movie.
 
2014-01-28 01:31:42 PM

DROxINxTHExWIND: I hate folks who make their kids retreive things for them regularly.

"Hey Lil Jimmie, go get that remote. Go get me something to drink. Go get my cell phone. Go get the chips out of the pantry and bring them to me. Go get me another piece of cake..."

Nothing wrong with getting the kids to assist you sometimes, but they're not dogs and they weren't born to serve you.


/Get off of your lazy ass


Yeah, Dad was a "Step-n-Fetch IT" kind of g ... Hey, sorry.
 
2014-01-28 01:31:47 PM
i512.photobucket.com
 
d23 [TotalFark]
2014-01-28 01:31:48 PM

vudukungfu: Kids should be given chores and they can earn an allowance. this teaches them the value of work and wages before they can even get a job. Which is important.


It's important in corporate-controlled world to learn how to do near-meaningless tasks for below minimum wage.
 
2014-01-28 01:32:02 PM

SordidEuphemism: This just in: Fully 3/4 of the people at my office have no idea who Rocky and Bullwinkle were.

I'm officially old.

Hold me.


Well, the movie was so bad it erased memories. It's not just your age.
 
2014-01-28 01:33:44 PM

MelGoesOnTour: I seem to be often subjected to, when at the grocery store, the slowest people in front of me in the aisle's as well as when waiting in line. It's when in the aisle's that I often seem to be behind older folks who use their grocery carts as walkers, arms folded and leaning across the hand-rest. And they are slow. Naturally, I know this helps support them (especially the older folks) but it is a nuisance just the same mainly because these people are painfully slow. Slow as sloths for the most part. Add to that the fact that they generally push their carts in the middle of the aisle---rather than at the right/left sides as traffic should dictate---these people are veritable roadblocks. And annoying. I do my best to skirt around them but it's not always easy to do. More often than not I find myself having to backtrack the aisle to get to the next aisle; this, of course, puts a damper on my own shopping experience which typically involves alternating aisle/travel-direction.


I usually just say "pardon me" and smile which works 100% of the time.

But you've clearly got a system, so good on you.
 
2014-01-28 01:34:17 PM

DROxINxTHExWIND: I hate folks who make their kids retreive things for them regularly.

"Hey Lil Jimmie, go get that remote. Go get me something to drink. Go get my cell phone. Go get the chips out of the pantry and bring them to me. Go get me another piece of cake..."

Nothing wrong with getting the kids to assist you sometimes, but they're not dogs and they weren't born to serve you.


/Get off of your lazy ass


So much this.

What they are teaching is "get someone else that you can order around on a whim", not "do the following things regularly in order to have a safe, healthy, and comfortable home"
 
2014-01-28 01:34:30 PM

DROxINxTHExWIND: Mell of a Hess: debug: I thought that 50% of the benefit of having kids was indentured servitude.

What's the problem?

Growing up in my Dad's house it was.

Uh oh. Unresolved issues bubbling to the surface. So, he was a real prick, huh?


Still is.
 
2014-01-28 01:34:56 PM

d23: vudukungfu: Kids should be given chores and they can earn an allowance. this teaches them the value of work and wages before they can even get a job. Which is important.

It's important in corporate-controlled world to learn how to do near-meaningless tasks for below minimum wage.


If the tasks are meaningless why would anyone want to pay much to have them done?
 
2014-01-28 01:35:36 PM

ChipNASA: Frecking Fark...my wife actually has this on the Fridge.

/4 year old and 11 month old...GET A JERB!!!


So maybe you can verify, but it seems to me that the list is more along the lines of "here are things that kids should be capable of doing at these ages" rather than "here are the things your kids should be doing on a regular basis at these ages".

And I find it a bit weird that they rank matching clean socks as more complex than sorting flatware, using a vacuum cleaner or setting the table.
 
2014-01-28 01:36:07 PM

MelGoesOnTour: I seem to be often subjected to, when at the grocery store, the slowest people in front of me in the aisle's as well as when waiting in line. It's when in the aisle's that I often seem to be behind older folks who use their grocery carts as walkers, arms folded and leaning across the hand-rest. And they are slow. Naturally, I know this helps support them (especially the older folks) but it is a nuisance just the same mainly because these people are painfully slow. Slow as sloths for the most part. Add to that the fact that they generally push their carts in the middle of the aisle---rather than at the right/left sides as traffic should dictate---these people are veritable roadblocks. And annoying. I do my best to skirt around them but it's not always easy to do. More often than not I find myself having to backtrack the aisle to get to the next aisle; this, of course, puts a damper on my own shopping experience which typically involves alternating aisle/travel-direction. This sort of inconvenience is intensified if I happen to be behind one of these "aisle blockers" at the checkout line. This sort of shopper will typically pay with cash and coinage (counting out each nickel verrrry slowly) or painstakingly write a check (making sure to make the exact entry in the checkbook right there rather than wait until they get home). Once this ritual is completed, it's generally followed by the woman---and it's invariably an old woman---organizing her suitcase-sized pocketbook, a task that can take seemingly several minutes. Grrrr....


What you need to do is be in their way. Ignore them entirely until they touch or nudge you then turn around make hand gestures and sound out words.
 
2014-01-28 01:36:10 PM
I hate the term "chores" for routine housework. There are a few things I consider a "chore", such as cleaning the shower, but they are not chores per se but rather stuff that needs to be done. Washing clothes is dead simple and requires no real work now that washing machines exist. Cooking is (or should be) fun and rewarding. Washing dishes is what you do because you don't want filthy dishes and disgusting pests.

Thankfully, I live in an apartment and don't have yard work, but if I did have a yard it would be a garden because fark lawns.

Kids don't do them because they don't care about that stuff. I didn't care if the leaves were raked up or if the lawn was cut, or if my clothes were wrinkly. As an adult I fold even my gym clothes, mostly so they fit in the drawer but still.
 
2014-01-28 01:36:21 PM
How is a 12  year old going to shop for groceries, even with a list?
 
2014-01-28 01:37:07 PM

d23: vudukungfu: Kids should be given chores and they can earn an allowance. this teaches them the value of work and wages before they can even get a job. Which is important.

It's important in corporate-controlled world to learn how to do near-meaningless tasks for below minimum wage.


Occam'd, but I see your point. Hope you see mine. Whether the world is corporate controlled, or the wages are lower than they should be, chores are the first "jobs" we have. The conditioning needs to happen for future security.
 
2014-01-28 01:39:52 PM

d23: vudukungfu: Kids should be given chores and they can earn an allowance. this teaches them the value of work and wages before they can even get a job. Which is important.

It's important in corporate-controlled world to learn how to do near-meaningless tasks for below minimum wage.


Sucks to not have any kind of useful skills.  Perhaps by doing chores kids will learn the value of not being useless, easily manipulated slaves
 
2014-01-28 01:39:54 PM
I didn't have many chores growing up and realize that it made me a less capable adult for a while until I learned to all the things that were done for me - laundry, cleaning the bathroom, vacuuming/mopping, cleaning the kitchen counters after cooking, etc.

I did do dishes enough that I had that down.

Chores aren't just division of labor (which is a legitimate concept, IMO), but is also an aspect of life skills training.  There are concepts like organization, basic reasoning, conservation, etc. that come from cleaning up after one's self and taking care of one's things.

If your teen has to do their own laundry or pay for their own dry cleaning, that might factor a little into their clothing choices.   They may also learn/reinforce basic organization - separating delicates, colors, etc.
If your kid has to clean their bathroom, they might be a little more tidy in their use of it (or less likely to trash it).  If they have to keep their (whole) room vacuumed, they may be less likely to leave stuff on the floor or be flippant about things like crumbs, scraps of paper or that random small debris that always litters my floors between vacuumings.

For fark's sake, get them cooking.  Every person by 11 or 12 year old should know how to follow a recipe for all the but the most complicated things.  You've succeeded if your kid can handle at least half of Thanksgiving dinner for a household.  Roasting a turkey, making stuffing, chopping vegetables, making pan gravy, etc are not difficult with a little planning.
 
2014-01-28 01:39:57 PM
But that trick never works!
 
2014-01-28 01:40:30 PM

robbiex0r: How is a 12  year old going to shop for groceries, even with a list?


Easy to do before urban sprawl made it impossible without driving.
 
2014-01-28 01:42:37 PM

robbiex0r: How is a 12  year old going to shop for groceries, even with a list?


give them cash or debit card and send them in.  It's DEAD simple.
 
2014-01-28 01:43:03 PM
"Meanwhile back at the ranch, Bullwinkle disguised as a door got his knob shot off!"
 
2014-01-28 01:45:40 PM
It's more of a chore to remind young kids (7 and under) to do their chores.  They (purposefully) never remember.   I have an 11 year old who earns money, or doesn't, by the jobs she has - putting away dishwasher dishes, doing her own laundry, clearing the dinner table, one or two others.   I have a 5 year old who I tried to teach to make his bed, and the results were such that I just did it myself every day anyway.  So he just has to keep his own toys and room clean.   This ain't no country club - you wanna eat and have clothes and toys and get driven to various birthday parties etc?  You gotta work.
 
2014-01-28 01:49:08 PM

wildcardjack: SordidEuphemism: This just in: Fully 3/4 of the people at my office have no idea who Rocky and Bullwinkle were.

I'm officially old.

Hold me.

Well, the movie was so bad it erased memories. It's not just your age.


True dat. Although you can buy each season separately or all five seasons in a boxed set for a very reasonable price and enjoy some of the finest comic timing, sly satire, and camp humour ever.

Maybe the people in your office are just really, really stupid people. What's wrong with kids nowadays if they don't love Rocky & Bullwinkle? George of the Jungle? Super-Chicken?

It's practically an IQ test, like giving a cashier twelve cans of soda arranged in a rectangle and seeing how long it takes her to count them.

Low IQ: counts one by one
Medium IQ: counts by threes or fours
Higher IQ: Multiplies 3 x 4 and gets 12.
Highest IQ: looks at rectangle and thinks "a dozen cans".

That's my IQ Test for Cashiers.

Maybe you should start wearing a Rocky & Bullwinkle sweat shirt on casual Fridays, if they allow t-shirts. Rocky & Bullwinkle is one of the few classic cartoons that wasn't ruined by going from theatric release to crappy television versions. As MAD magazine might put it, it started out as crappy television--with wit and humour and clever jibes at media, politics and popular culture.
 
2014-01-28 01:50:40 PM

robbiex0r: How is a 12  year old going to shop for groceries, even with a list?


My son will be 11 next month. He can read. He can add and subtract. He has a basic understanding of units of measure. And he knows about how much the things we regularly buy should cost. I don't know why a 12 year old would have difficulty with those things. Hell, my son came running up to the cart last week with two extra bags of goldfish (they're like crack to him) because they were on sale.
 
2014-01-28 01:52:49 PM

robbiex0r: How is a 12  year old going to shop for groceries, even with a list?


??
Walk or bike to store.
Put items in basket.
Pay cash for items.
Walk or bike home.
 
2014-01-28 01:53:32 PM

MyRandomName: Is subby from the school of liberalism that teaches all work is bad or something? Chores are good for children.


I was going to say this. Chores teach important life lessons such as distrusting the Man, incredulity when people tell you something is good for you or unpleasant but necessary, and sub-delegating stupid busy work and crap jobs to younger or weaker people.

If you don't have to do chores as a child, you may grow up a socialist minion. With choress, you may grow up to be a Commissar or even the next Stalin.

Thanks to having to work as a child, I strenuously avoid all but the most necessary house work even unto this day. And I am a genius at finding ways to make work easier or altogether redundant. I've worked my way out of hundreds of jobs in record time.
 
2014-01-28 01:54:18 PM

MelGoesOnTour: I seem to be often subjected to, when at the grocery store, the slowest people in front of me in the aisle's as well as when waiting in line. It's when in the aisle's that I often seem to be behind older folks who use their grocery carts as walkers, arms folded and leaning across the hand-rest. And they are slow. Naturally, I know this helps support them (especially the older folks) but it is a nuisance just the same mainly because these people are painfully slow. Slow as sloths for the most part. Add to that the fact that they generally push their carts in the middle of the aisle---rather than at the right/left sides as traffic should dictate---these people are veritable roadblocks. And annoying. I do my best to skirt around them but it's not always easy to do. More often than not I find myself having to backtrack the aisle to get to the next aisle; this, of course, puts a damper on my own shopping experience which typically involves alternating aisle/travel-direction. This sort of inconvenience is intensified if I happen to be behind one of these "aisle blockers" at the checkout line. This sort of shopper will typically pay with cash and coinage (counting out each nickel verrrry slowly) or painstakingly write a check (making sure to make the exact entry in the checkbook right there rather than wait until they get home). Once this ritual is completed, it's generally followed by the woman---and it's invariably an old woman---organizing her suitcase-sized pocketbook, a task that can take seemingly several minutes. Grrrr....


CSB, but what does it have to do with  the linked article of making children do chores?
 
2014-01-28 01:55:53 PM
I keep telling the wife we need to have a kid so we have less stuff to do around the house.
 
2014-01-28 01:56:11 PM
I like how some of the comments on the Facebook picture are "But cooking is dangerous for a 10 year old!" Really? By 10 I was making roasts and soups unsupervised (yes I know, easy meals, but still legitimate cooking). I never cut myself with a knife or burned myself until I became a boozy adult. 10 year olds aren't incompetent. Quit coddling your kids.
 
2014-01-28 01:56:37 PM

MelGoesOnTour: I seem to be often subjected to, when at the grocery store, the slowest people in front of me in the aisle's as well as when waiting in line. It's when in the aisle's that I often seem to be behind older folks who use their grocery carts as walkers, arms folded and leaning across the hand-rest. And they are slow. Naturally, I know this helps support them (especially the older folks) but it is a nuisance just the same mainly because these people are painfully slow. Slow as sloths for the most part. Add to that the fact that they generally push their carts in the middle of the aisle---rather than at the right/left sides as traffic should dictate---these people are veritable roadblocks. And annoying. I do my best to skirt around them but it's not always easy to do. More often than not I find myself having to backtrack the aisle to get to the next aisle; this, of course, puts a damper on my own shopping experience which typically involves alternating aisle/travel-direction. This sort of inconvenience is intensified if I happen to be behind one of these "aisle blockers" at the checkout line. This sort of shopper will typically pay with cash and coinage (counting out each nickel verrrry slowly) or painstakingly write a check (making sure to make the exact entry in the checkbook right there rather than wait until they get home). Once this ritual is completed, it's generally followed by the woman---and it's invariably an old woman---organizing her suitcase-sized pocketbook, a task that can take seemingly several minutes. Grrrr....


That's called life, my man.
 
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