If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Gigwise)   Daft Punk fans demand the duo go on tour after their quite good performance at the Grammy Awards   (gigwise.com) divider line 159
    More: Unlikely, Daft Punk, Grammy  
•       •       •

1851 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 27 Jan 2014 at 3:21 PM (11 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



159 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | » | Last | Show all
 
2014-01-27 08:03:37 PM

Ishkur: As per my three rules:

1) Lord Discogs knows all. Except when I know more.


Anyone can claim they know more, you actually have to prove that.
 
2014-01-27 08:04:40 PM

Ishkur: such as?


Go buy "Freedom Rock" and turn it up, man!
 
2014-01-27 08:08:47 PM

Glitchwerks: Anyone can claim they know more, you actually have to prove that.


No, I'm conceding on this front. While Paperclip People - Throw is not technically French House, it is an excellent example of the filter technique from which Daft Punk would derive their sound in the first ep a year later. I am absorbing this knowledge as I type and inserting it into the new guide, bolstering its accuracy and authenticity. And I have you to thank for that.

I never claim to know everything. But I know a lot -- usually more than everyone else -- and I will side with reason and evidence every time, irrespective of the source. No egos here.

You just have to be on your toes when you sling your shiat. I may come off as arrogant, but usually it's just skeptical curiosity.
 
2014-01-27 08:13:58 PM

Glitchwerks: Go buy "Freedom Rock" and turn it up, man!


What, this?

I'm.... not sure you're understanding this properly.

/note: the new generation doesn't call it anthem anymore. Now it's Big Room. Most of them don't even know what that means and shove everything from moombah to trouse under the label.
 
2014-01-27 08:15:43 PM

LewDux: Mikey1969: LewDux: Mikey1969: That's why I stopped going to live performances then sound recording was invented

Confusing producers with the guy on the board at an arena isn't making you sound more sophisticated...

I don't attend live performances because they just play same songs they already recorded
/Plus

That's because they use house sound systems to actually produce the sound. The only hot amps are the ones that produce the final mix, it's why you see a microphone in front of the amp. Of course, one so knowledgeable as yourself about what constitutes performing vs. standing there listening to a recording you previously made would know that already, I'm sure...

As for "playing music they've already recorded", a live performance is just that-live. A "live" performance of people who don't play musical instruments, except for back in the studio, is nothing but playing a recording.

They still play old sequences of sounds, especially in Classical music with their completely over-rated conductors
/What if your understanding of producer music is as good as my understanding of real music? Nah..


So you're comparing a live Symphony to two dudes on a computer? OK, got it.
 
2014-01-27 08:19:18 PM

Ishkur: I never claim to know everything. But I know a lot -- usually more than everyone else -- and I will side with reason and evidence every time, irrespective of the source. No egos here.


No one can claim to know everything in this style of music.  There's simply too much and people tend to specialize.  

I will say that I keep up with a decent portion of it, but I also tend to specialize.
 
2014-01-27 08:22:15 PM

Ishkur: As an example: This guy recreated Smack My biatch Up in Ableton. Count how many samples were used and how they were textured. And the original was something Liam Howlett constructed with hardware back in 97.


That is farking crazy.  Dude must have had a lot of time on his hands
 
2014-01-27 08:23:17 PM

Ishkur: I'm.... not sure you're understanding this properly.

/note: the new generation doesn't call it anthem anymore. Now it's Big Room. Most of them don't even know what that means and shove everything from moombah to trouse under the label.


Let's just agree we have semantic differences with what "anthem" is and leave it at that.

And, yes, I know of Big Room.  Certainly enough to avoid it and head to where "Peak Hour" is the term used.
 
2014-01-27 08:41:10 PM

Glitchwerks: No one can claim to know everything in this style of music. There's simply too much and people tend to specialize.


Despite the fact that I've catalogued over 10,000 tracks in over 200 genres and 30 scenes, it still feels like I've barely covered one tenth of one percent of what's actually out there. And the only thing I could confidently call myself a specialist on is Italo Disco. That's why I've employed liaisons on specific scenes to help me out with some of the nitty gritties. I have a jungle specialist, a techno specialist, an industrial specialist, etc...

But that's what makes it so fun! I love exploring. I love finding a new artist or label, and that leads to more labels and music, like opening a door in a maze and it leads to more doors, and they just keep expanding and fragmenting forever, and you never reach the end. No genre is ever fully complete. There is always more to learn.

I wouldn't do this if I didn't love it.
 
2014-01-27 08:41:38 PM
live concert?

So, what, they show up and press PLAY?

Awesome
 
2014-01-27 08:46:46 PM

Glitchwerks: Let's just agree we have semantic differences with what "anthem" is and leave it at that.


Just as long as you don't define it as something that gets popular (ie: hits). So every time you see a comp that says "Speed Garage Anthems Vol. 4"...... those aren't anthems, they're just hits. Even though it says anthem. Compilation makers are the dumbest shiats in the history of music and they're part of the problem that adds to the confusion.
 
2014-01-27 08:54:06 PM

Ishkur: Despite the fact that I've catalogued over 10,000 tracks in over 200 genres and 30 scenes, it still feels like I've barely covered one tenth of one percent of what's actually out there. And the only thing I could confidently call myself a specialist on is Italo Disco. That's why I've employed liaisons on specific scenes to help me out with some of the nitty gritties. I have a jungle specialist, a techno specialist, an industrial specialist, etc...


I'm well over 10,000 tracks.  :/

I'm just over 10,000 releases.

I specialize in dub techno, Detroit techno, industrial techno, atmospheric drum n bass, techstep, neurofunk, drone ambient, and such.

Ishkur: Just as long as you don't define it as something that gets popular (ie: hits).


I've been listening to breakbeat since "Radio Babylon" and "Charly"...I know what anthem means.  You may disagree with my definition, that's fine.  But when "Jaguar" plays, everybody knows what to do.
 
2014-01-27 09:13:53 PM

Glitchwerks: I'm well over 10,000 tracks


Indexed in a database by track, artist, year, genre, scene, and called via Python script into a visually appealing and custom coded map API?

Yeah, I probably have about 500 gigabytes worth of music in three separate hard drives. I'd love to put it all in the guide, and I will eventually, but let's just deal with, for now, the bare minimum required to establish the existence of a genre as defined by a group of similar-sounding songs.

Glitchwerks: I specialize in dub techno, Detroit techno, industrial techno, atmospheric drum n bass, techstep, neurofunk, drone ambient, and such.


If you're interested in helping out, by all means shoot me an email. I take in everything, shut out nothing, and everyone's input is encouraged. I am almost certain that you could probably come up with stuff that I haven't thought of, forcing me to correct my current path. But please don't wait til after the guide is launched to do that.

Glitchwerks: But when "Jaguar" plays, everybody knows what to do.


Right. And when it was released, this was the biggest anthem that year. You see the difference?

Unless you're up for creating a separate "anthem techno" category. But...... naaaaaah.
 
2014-01-27 09:18:46 PM
I rewatched Daft Punk's performance from last night. This might have been picked up already, but did anyone notice the robots dropped in samples from "Around the World" near the end, with about 20-30 seconds left to go? Farking brilliant.
 
2014-01-27 09:24:17 PM
Mikey1969: The only hot amps are the ones that produce the final mix, it's why you see a microphone in front of the amp.

What? I am confused, why would an amp be mic'd in an all-keyboard band? The only reason to ever mic an amp is to get the sound of the amp itself to contribute to the overall tone of a guitar or bass. Sound coloured by an amp is not something that a synth player ever wants, and the only time I have *ever* seen a synth amp mic'd was in a hole-in-the-wall bar without proper equipment to run a feed. Keyboard amps should be used as monitors for the performer, they're not to be heard by FOH.
 
2014-01-27 09:32:15 PM

Ishkur: Indexed in a database by track, artist, year, genre, scene, and called via Python script into a visually appealing and custom coded map API?


I use Foobar with a custom theme and have everything properly tagged with additional release information from Discogs including record label, catalog number, etc.  Autoplaylists set to collate record labels.

I think we differ on what we consider genres.  For example, I consider techno to be a style of the genre of electronic music.  I stick to sorting by record labels over genre and style though.

Ishkur: Yeah, I probably have about 500 gigabytes worth of music in three separate hard drives.


1.5 TB here.  There's more but it's not sorted and I find it hard to find the will to go through old stuff like Muslimgauze.

Ishkur: If you're interested in helping out, by all means shoot me an email.


I'll think about it.

Ishkur: Unless you're up for creating a separate "anthem techno" category. But...... naaaaaah.


Like I said, we'll agree to disagree!
 
2014-01-27 09:35:26 PM

Dragonflew: Mikey1969: The only hot amps are the ones that produce the final mix, it's why you see a microphone in front of the amp.

What? I am confused, why would an amp be mic'd in an all-keyboard band? The only reason to ever mic an amp is to get the sound of the amp itself to contribute to the overall tone of a guitar or bass. Sound coloured by an amp is not something that a synth player ever wants, and the only time I have *ever* seen a synth amp mic'd was in a hole-in-the-wall bar without proper equipment to run a feed. Keyboard amps should be used as monitors for the performer, they're not to be heard by FOH.


This is the picture in question. The OP was somehow saying something about this band having empty cabinets so Daft Punk are musical geniuses or something. I was explaining why a rock band doesn't actually use that wall of amps on stage, and that they are props.

http://metalinjection.s3.amazonaws.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/Bla c k-Veil-Brides-fake-cabs.jpg
 
2014-01-27 09:42:58 PM

InmanRoshi: Don't really care about the robot dudes, but I would love to see a Nathan East and Omar Hakim rhythm section go on tour.



I second that.
 
2014-01-27 09:50:48 PM

Glitchwerks: Autoplaylists set to collate record labels.


I don't see the point. Most labels that specialize are only a handful of artists anyway. And everything is getting blurry in the age of Beatport and Soundcloud. But whatever. I do that too.

Glitchwerks: For example, I consider techno to be a style of the genre of electronic music. I stick to sorting by record labels over genre and style though.


That's too messy. It's actually easier to not look at the music itself, but rather the people who listen to it. What kind of people -- like yourself -- are into Techno? It's more than just a genre, it is a culture. It has a shared history of values and experience, distinct fashion and dance, and even a language in some cases.

You see these little single-music cultures all over electronic music. Some of them overlap, but most do not. I have labeled these little cultures "scenes", and have categorized about 30 of them in all of electronic music. Within these scenes, there are an endless number of genres and semi-genre and faux-genres and fights and arguments over which goes where, but outside of them the demarcations are pretty clear and evident.

Everything after that is just cataloguing and sorting. When I can get around to it.
 
2014-01-27 09:58:44 PM

mrEdude: live concert?

So, what, they show up and press PLAY?

Awesome


You're right. Musicians, much less electronic musicians, would NEVER improvise at a live show! Performing is never fun or interesting!

Homework, is required on playlist!
 
2014-01-27 09:58:52 PM

Mikey1969: This is the picture in question. The OP was somehow saying something about this band having empty cabinets so Daft Punk are musical geniuses or something. I was explaining why a rock band doesn't actually use that wall of amps on stage, and that they are props.

http://metalinjection.s3.amazonaws.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/Bla c k-Veil-Brides-fake-cabs.jpg


Gotcha. Yeah, no one needs a wall of functioning amps on stage these days. The mains have plenty of power.

I like how Rush doesn't even try to fool people...

3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2014-01-27 10:11:11 PM

Ishkur: I don't see the point. Most labels that specialize are only a handful of artists anyway. And everything is getting blurry in the age of Beatport and Soundcloud. But whatever. I do that too.


It depends on the label.  Beatport is still very label oriented.  Did you mean Bandcamp?  That's certainly what has blurred things with all the self-released material.

Ishkur: That's too messy. It's actually easier to not look at the music itself, but rather the people who listen to it. What kind of people -- like yourself -- are into Techno? It's more than just a genre, it is a culture. It has a shared history of values and experience, distinct fashion and dance, and even a language in some cases.

You see these little single-music cultures all over electronic music. Some of them overlap, but most do not. I have labeled these little cultures "scenes", and have categorized about 30 of them in all of electronic music. Within these scenes, there are an endless number of genres and semi-genre and faux-genres and fights and arguments over which goes where, but outside of them the demarcations are pretty clear and evident.


That sounds to me like a bit of "how are your albums organized? autobiographically" a la High Fidelity.

Which is probably why I stick with the record labels themselves.
 
2014-01-27 10:21:57 PM

Dragonflew: Mikey1969: This is the picture in question. The OP was somehow saying something about this band having empty cabinets so Daft Punk are musical geniuses or something. I was explaining why a rock band doesn't actually use that wall of amps on stage, and that they are props.

http://metalinjection.s3.amazonaws.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/Bla c k-Veil-Brides-fake-cabs.jpg

Gotcha. Yeah, no one needs a wall of functioning amps on stage these days. The mains have plenty of power.

I like how Rush doesn't even try to fool people...


I like when they had the rotisserie on stage with all of the chickens in it. I only saw some pics, but somebody who was at the show said a stagehand would come out and baste them every once in awhile...
 
2014-01-27 10:49:42 PM
I absolutely do not get it at all.
But I am happy that others can derive some entertainment pleasure from it.
 
2014-01-27 10:52:34 PM

Glitchwerks: It depends on the label. Beatport is still very label oriented. Did you mean Bandcamp? That's certainly what has blurred things with all the self-released material.


And Mixcloud. It's getting really unnerving finding a lot of music that is not attache to anything. Not even Discogs keeps up with it anymore. Hard to verify releases. Especially in Chiptune.

Glitchwerks: That sounds to me like a bit of "how are your albums organized? autobiographically" a la High Fidelity.
Which is probably why I stick with the record labels themselves.


And then you come across ZYX or Virgin which doesn't work at all.

Anyways, you have no cause to complain. And if you do, by all means make your own music guide and right my wrongs.
 
2014-01-27 10:59:49 PM

doctor wu: InmanRoshi: Don't really care about the robot dudes, but I would love to see a Nathan East and Omar Hakim rhythm section go on tour.


I second that.


Don't forget Paul Jackson, Jr.

These guys have been all over a ton of AC, smooth jazz, and pop tracks for the last 30 years.

Dire Straits
Phil Collins
Sting
Madonna
Clapton
Toto
Elton John
Etc.
 
2014-01-27 11:01:09 PM

Ishkur: And then you come across ZYX or Virgin which doesn't work at all.


Not much of a problem there since I don't do ZYX and Virgin is limited to the few things like the Chems, FSoL, Photek, etc.

The majority of my music comes from labels like echospace [detroit], Tresor, Modern Love, Fokuz, GLR, Delsin, Ninja Tune, Warp, etc. and it all sorts quite nicely for me.

The only pain in the arse really are "Unknown Artist" releases from Hard Wax.  Those really obscure things with no information at all on them, but sometimes are killer tools.
 
2014-01-27 11:14:08 PM

Glitchwerks: Not much of a problem there since I don't do ZYX and Virgin is limited to the few things like the Chems, FSoL, Photek, etc.


I don't have that option. I need to cover everything.

See, you may have 1.5 TB of techno, but I have 500 GB of EVERYTHING. You may have three times more music, but I easily have 50 times more artists and labels. And the addictive completist in me finds more every day.

Glitchwerks: The only pain in the arse really are "Unknown Artist" releases from Hard Wax


Or Spiral Tribe. Didn't name anything, just recorded and released. It's like the thrash of techno.
 
2014-01-27 11:33:31 PM

Ishkur: I don't have that option. I need to cover everything.

See, you may have 1.5 TB of techno, but I have 500 GB of EVERYTHING. You may have three times more music, but I easily have 50 times more artists and labels. And the addictive completist in me finds more every day.


Don't get me wrong, it's not entirely techno, although that certainly is a significant portion of it.  I have music from more than a few styles but you are right that I don't have everything.  Of course, I don't want everything!  There are more than a few things I want nothing to do with.  I can't get into a discussion over who has more labels and artists, I simply don't know what you have.  This isn't anywhere near complete yet but:

http://www.last.fm/user/Glitchwerks

Honestly, I wouldn't enjoy listening to everything under the sun either.  Trance labels tend to shove 20+ new releases out the door everyday and I can't be bothered.
 
2014-01-27 11:48:07 PM

Glitchwerks: Honestly, I wouldn't enjoy listening to everything under the sun either. Trance labels tend to shove 20+ new releases out the door everyday and I can't be bothered.


I once spent a whole day going through about 1200 McProg/TwinkleProg tracks made between 2004 and 2010.

I kept 25 of them.

Also spent half a day consuming this. 8 hours and 100+ tracks of banal electro made in 2012. I think I kept one track.

There is a lot of shiat out there. But you have to slog through the shiat to find the gems. And that's what makes it all worthwhile.
 
2014-01-27 11:52:57 PM

Ishkur: I once spent a whole day going through about 1200 McProg/TwinkleProg tracks made between 2004 and 2010.

I kept 25 of them.

Also spent half a day consuming this. 8 hours and 100+ tracks of banal electro made in 2012. I think I kept one track.

There is a lot of shiat out there. But you have to slog through the shiat to find the gems. And that's what makes it all worthwhile.


Too much slogging with that.  I listen to new music every day too, but keeping the focus down means I generally have a much higher signal to noise ratio than 100+ tracks to only find 1 is a keeper.
 
2014-01-28 12:02:00 AM

Glitchwerks: Too much slogging with that.


Has to be done. My cross to bear.

Glitchwerks: I listen to new music every day too, but keeping the focus down means I generally have a much higher signal to noise ratio than 100+ tracks to only find 1 is a keeper.


Yeah, but your music is redundant. You're collecting more gems of the same stuff from the same people. I probably have more diversity than you just in Italo alone.
 
2014-01-28 12:22:59 AM

Ishkur: Yeah, but your music is redundant. You're collecting more gems of the same stuff from the same people. I probably have more diversity than you just in Italo alone.


Those are just basically assumptions on your part.  You have to actually show your collection to validate any sort of statements like those.  I think they are incorrect assumptions, but, well, you can view my Last.FM profile and decide for yourself.

That's it for me for tonight though.
 
2014-01-28 12:38:44 AM

Glitchwerks: Those are just basically assumptions on your part.


No, its hyperbole dude. Sheesh, get the stick out of your bum. I've been farking with you this whole time.
 
2014-01-28 12:45:51 AM
I have loved Daft Punk for years. However I would probably not go see them live. EDM live is just not my thing.

Saw The KLF" supposedly live in 1992 in Dallas. The KLF guys were not even there.  They just had some people lip synching to a tape.  Not cool.  Not cool at all.
 
2014-01-28 12:59:29 AM

paulleah: Saw The KLF" supposedly live in 1992 in Dallas. The KLF guys were not even there. They just had some people lip synching to a tape. Not cool. Not cool at all.


That would be Wanda Dee and the "KLF Experience". She was a one-time vocalist guest-starring as one of the many, many, MANY samples that Bill and Jimmy used (the "I wanna see you sweat" diva). What she was doing was illegal. You got ripped off.

The KLF never performed stateside to my knowledge.
 
2014-01-28 01:19:32 AM

Ishkur: Glitchwerks: Honestly, I wouldn't enjoy listening to everything under the sun either. Trance labels tend to shove 20+ new releases out the door everyday and I can't be bothered.

I once spent a whole day going through about 1200 McProg/TwinkleProg tracks made between 2004 and 2010.

I kept 25 of them.

Also spent half a day consuming this. 8 hours and 100+ tracks of banal electro made in 2012. I think I kept one track.

There is a lot of shiat out there. But you have to slog through the shiat to find the gems. And that's what makes it all worthwhile.


Amateur question here.  If you're slogging through 100+ tracks in a single session can you give songs in the last hour, the same listen honest appraisal that you give songs in the first hour?

It would seem to me that to take a term from cooking you would need to cleanse  your palate.  Otherwise tracks from the same or similar artists can all begin to run together.  At which point everything sounds good, or everything sounds like crap.
 
2014-01-28 01:48:23 AM

BizarreMan: Amateur question here. If you're slogging through 100+ tracks in a single session can you give songs in the last hour, the same listen honest appraisal that you give songs in the first hour?
It would seem to me that to take a term from cooking you would need to cleanse your palate. Otherwise tracks from the same or similar artists can all begin to run together. At which point everything sounds good, or everything sounds like crap.


That happens all the time. Most recently it happened with Oldskool Rave Hardcore. I had about 500 tracks from 93/94 and decided to listen to them in alphabetical order. By the time I got to the Cs, I was thoroughly tired of the stuff. It's like eating really rich chocolate or watching a Curb Your Enthusiasm marathon -- best appreciated in small doses. Prolonged exposure really grates on you.

When that happens, I simply stop listening to it and move on to something else. A lot of music you really have to be in the right mood to get into. If I'm not feeling funky, I won't listen to funk. If I feel down, I'm not listening to upbeat. If I feel amped, I'm not listening to downtempo. And so on... state of mind really does discern musical appreciation a lot of the time. So it helps to switch things up constantly. I always have the right music to reflect whatever I'm feeling on any given day.

I have a reputation for being a bitter and jaded asshole to all electronic music, but truth be known there are only a handful of genres I don't actively listen to. I accept and enjoy over 90% of it. But the ones I don't like, I REALLY despise.
 
2014-01-28 02:30:15 AM
...for later
 
2014-01-28 04:56:48 AM
holy crap, they were able to get an auditorium packed with music legends and heavy weights to all stand up and dance for their entire 6+ minute performance. how many performaners could pull that off these days?
 
2014-01-28 11:19:28 AM

downstairs: I've heard this more than once, that Bono totally fakes playing guitar during "One" live. Which is kinda weird- he's not the guitarist, the song stands on its own, no need to fake it.

Not sure if this is true- you apparently have visual confirmation. I like U2 and love that song. But still- kinda weird.


yeah, it is just weird.  why bother having your guitar tech string it up and tune it, all for a 3:45 minute song that doesn't need your guitar anyways.  what are we doing here, bono?  you aren't playing.why must you pantomime for people?
 
2014-01-28 02:00:49 PM

Glitchwerks: Ishkur: These guys -- Guy-Manuel de Homem-Christo and Thomas Bangalter -- are the producers who made the music.

Which basically involves sampling someone else's music, looping it, and filtering it.  Or in the case of "RAM," hiring other musicians to play for them.

I get that people like Daft Punk, but they are so amazingly overrated it's just stupid.


No, you're the stupid one for insisting that an artist's creative value is only to the degree they can play a traditional instrument.  With computers, the only limit to a person's creativity is their own creativity, not some dumb rubric of physically manipulating some antiquated object that can only make a limited set of sounds.  Electronic artists make *exactly* the music they have in their heads, traditional artists make the music their antiquated instruments allow them to make.
 
2014-01-28 03:46:33 PM

Mikey1969: LewDux: Mikey1969: LewDux: Mikey1969: That's why I stopped going to live performances then sound recording was invented

Confusing producers with the guy on the board at an arena isn't making you sound more sophisticated...

I don't attend live performances because they just play same songs they already recorded
/Plus

That's because they use house sound systems to actually produce the sound. The only hot amps are the ones that produce the final mix, it's why you see a microphone in front of the amp. Of course, one so knowledgeable as yourself about what constitutes performing vs. standing there listening to a recording you previously made would know that already, I'm sure...

As for "playing music they've already recorded", a live performance is just that-live. A "live" performance of people who don't play musical instruments, except for back in the studio, is nothing but playing a recording.

They still play old sequences of sounds, especially in Classical music with their completely over-rated conductors
/What if your understanding of producer music is as good as my understanding of real music? Nah..

So you're comparing a live Symphony to two dudes on a computer? OK, got it.


Both orchestra and "computer" are tools. Nothing more
/You process fetishing rockist, you
 
2014-01-28 03:52:51 PM
The biggest argument that needs to become defunct is that they are "simply clicking buttons and sliding faders" and whatnot. They still have to write (and have received full credit) for writing this music. They still have to play this music; regardless of the artists they have enlisted to perform on the album, they are excellent musicians.

Furthermore, if you can get Paul McCartney dancing around like he's going to shard himself, I don't care what anybody else is saying, you're doing something right.
 
2014-01-28 03:59:20 PM

mjjt: [i39.tinypic.com image 500x441]


so... they are halo fans?
 
2014-01-28 04:00:34 PM

AdrienVeidt: No, you're the stupid one for insisting that an artist's creative value is only to the degree they can play a traditional instrument.  With computers, the only limit to a person's creativity is their own creativity, not some dumb rubric of physically manipulating some antiquated object that can only make a limited set of sounds.  Electronic artists make *exactly* the music they have in their heads, traditional artists make the music their antiquated instruments allow them to make.


Actually I'm afraid you're the one who's stupid here because you completely misunderstood the point.

Or you're trolling, either way, amazing derpy post on your part.
 
2014-01-28 04:48:06 PM

vevolis: The biggest argument that needs to become defunct is that they are "simply clicking buttons and sliding faders" and whatnot. They still have to write (and have received full credit) for writing this music. They still have to play this music; regardless of the artists they have enlisted to perform on the album, they are excellent musicians.

Furthermore, if you can get Paul McCartney dancing around like he's going to shard himself, I don't care what anybody else is saying, you're doing something right.


You're darn tootin. And I'm the first one to post that "Superstar DJ - Stop Pretending You're Making That Music All By Yourself" photo. But what Daft Punk have succeeded at is far more difficult than simply "DJing" and puts them in a more rarefied class of performers. They're essentially making the computers, and the recording studio, musical instruments all on their own. And they're very good at it.
 
2014-01-28 05:00:33 PM

AdrienVeidt: Electronic artists make *exactly* the music they have in their heads


Well, not really. Some of them just fiddle with envelopes and filters until they stumble upon something that sounds cool (apparently this is how Air made Sexy Boy). A great deal of experimentation and trial-and-error goes into producing music. Not all of it is preplanned, and quite often most of it is made by accident -- as a result of "what does this button/knob/slider do" curiosity. Hell, that's how acid was made. The TB-303 is a bassline synth, and it actually does makes decent basslines if you follow the instruction manual. You were supposed to set it and forget it. Then one day someone said "what if I twist these knobs while it's playing?" and music history was made.

Most bedroom producers don't make the music *exactly* the way they have it in their heads, they make the music *exactly* the way they heard it at last night's club or as per youtube tutorials.

But that's okay. All music has its own cheats and shortcuts.

d25dde89tzdfps.cloudfront.net
 
2014-01-28 05:02:14 PM

Pontious Pilates: They're essentially making the computers, and the recording studio, musical instruments all on their own.


No, they aren't.  There are artists who do their own software design, build their own instruments, do all of their own sound design, handle all their production and mastering.

Daft Punk do absolutely none of what you claim.
 
2014-01-28 05:04:35 PM

Pontious Pilates: And I'm the first one to post that "Superstar DJ - Stop Pretending You're Making That Music All By Yourself" photo.


I'm the first one who made it.
 
Displayed 50 of 159 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report