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(The Day)   "The Bank Street [Fire Department] headquarters did not meet fire safety codes, was not compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act and had no fire alarm, sprinkler or fire suppression systems"   (theday.com) divider line 9
    More: Ironic, Americans with Disabilities Act, fire suppression, irrigation sprinklers, New London, Americans, fire departments, safety codes, building codes  
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3072 clicks; posted to Main » on 26 Jan 2014 at 1:32 PM (47 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
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2014-01-26 02:26:26 PM  
2 votes:
This is just as terrible as a 911 operator having no ability to call 911, only the local police and fire departments.
2014-01-26 01:58:33 PM  
2 votes:
My dad was a firefighter decades ago. The station wasn't much more than a garage with a small kitchen area and a bathroom. There was a smallish "lounging" area where they had a card table, a few chairs, and a couch. There was an old TV, too, but it was mostly used to watch sports or to occupy the kids when they were stuck hanging out there, waiting for their dads. The kitchen had a stack of locally-made sodas on pallets, and a supply of Clark bars, as well as basic food items.

There was no sprinkler system in place. There was a smoke alarm, of course, but it was in the kitchen area, on the ceiling (which was pretty high, IIRC). The "fire suppression system" was the damned truck, which was filled with large quantities of water and foam.

As for ADA compliance, well... There weren't a lot of crippled, wheelchair-bound firefighters back then. If that has changed, then more power to them, but there's no reason for anyone other than a firefighter (or his immediate family, on certain occasions) to visit a fire station. The permits and all that other junk are given out at the courthouse or other bureaucratic buildings. The fire station was where they stored the firefighting equipment and where the firefighters hung out and played cards while eating hot dogs and chili in-between fire calls.
2014-01-26 01:43:39 PM  
2 votes:
It would take zero seconds for the fire dept. to respond to that location, there's lots of firefighting equipment already on site, and the firefighters have to be in tip-top shape. (And not, say, in a wheelchair.)

So, where's the problem?
2014-01-26 03:35:38 PM  
1 votes:

WelldeadLink: ZeroCorpse: Maybe some newer full-time stations are all fancy, but traditionally, nobody has gone to the fire station to find solace. It's just a place from which firefighters are dispatched. It's utilitarian and above-ground, and frequently unmanned in the case of volunteer fire departments. if you went there when you were in trouble, you'd have a good chance of knocking on the door of an empty garage.

Or you're likely to find a locked-up building that's full of sleeping firefighters. They're secured areas. If you need help, there's a phone or button outside. If someone in a wheelchair needs to get indoors, they can open the garage doors -- fire trucks don't like steps much either.


Right. In a full-time station, they usually have living quarters upstairs. This consists of a series of cots/beds, a row of lockers, a couple small bathrooms (if they're lucky), and a kitchenette. It does not need to be handicap-accessible because the handicapped have no business in the firefighter living quarters. It's designed so the firefighters can sleep, use the restroom, wash, dress, and get to the trucks quickly.

But not all stations are full-time. There's usually one or those in an large town, and then several small part-time "volunteer" stations to make up the rest of the force (BTW, volunteer firefighters aren't really "volunteers" in the true sense; They get paid. They're just part-timers.) Small towns often do not have the full-time station, and just have a couple volunteer stations, if that.

And yes, if you need to get a wheelchair into a station for some reason, you can always go though the huge doors for trucks. No ramp needed.
2014-01-26 03:03:58 PM  
1 votes:

ZeroCorpse: As for ADA compliance, well... There weren't a lot of crippled, wheelchair-bound firefighters back then


We took tours of fire stations in elementary school. It would suck to be left behind because you're in a wheelchair.
2014-01-26 02:30:46 PM  
1 votes:

simrobert2001: gerbilpox: It would take zero seconds for the fire dept. to respond to that location, there's lots of firefighting equipment already on site, and the firefighters have to be in tip-top shape. (And not, say, in a wheelchair.)

So, where's the problem?

Its not going to matter if all the equipment in the world is stationed there if its all out on calls. Fire alarms actually help by 1) warning the people inside the building that there is a fire, and 2) Sending a signal to local 911 services, or an alarm company that there is a fire.

The issue with ADA certification is that Fire stations are "safe places" that people can goto when they need protection from home like (Such as abuse, rape, ect.) If someone disabled cannot get into the safe place, they cannot be protected.


When did that happen?

Honestly, I never saw that happen. The police station? Sure. But the fire station was literally just a garage where they stored the equipment and firefighters. There's usually nothing there in regards to guest accommodations or visitor areas. It's a garage. There are a couple big doors for trucks to go through, and there are a couple little doors that lead into the same open area where the trucks are, for the people to go through. There's a sewer drain on the floor because they wash the trucks inside the firestation.

Maybe some newer full-time stations are all fancy, but traditionally, nobody has gone to the fire station to find solace. It's just a place from which firefighters are dispatched. It's utilitarian and above-ground, and frequently unmanned in the case of volunteer fire departments. if you went there when you were in trouble, you'd have a good chance of knocking on the door of an empty garage.
2014-01-26 02:00:57 PM  
1 votes:

gerbilpox: It would take zero seconds for the fire dept. to respond to that location, there's lots of firefighting equipment already on site, and the firefighters have to be in tip-top shape. (And not, say, in a wheelchair.)

So, where's the problem?


Its not going to matter if all the equipment in the world is stationed there if its all out on calls. Fire alarms actually help by 1) warning the people inside the building that there is a fire, and 2) Sending a signal to local 911 services, or an alarm company that there is a fire.

The issue with ADA certification is that Fire stations are "safe places" that people can goto when they need protection from home like (Such as abuse, rape, ect.) If someone disabled cannot get into the safe place, they cannot be protected.
2014-01-26 01:36:58 PM  
1 votes:
Other than the big red truck parked inside it you mean?
2014-01-26 01:33:55 PM  
1 votes:
static.squarespace.com
We'll take it
 
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