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(The Day)   "The Bank Street [Fire Department] headquarters did not meet fire safety codes, was not compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act and had no fire alarm, sprinkler or fire suppression systems"   (theday.com) divider line 54
    More: Ironic, Americans with Disabilities Act, fire suppression, irrigation sprinklers, New London, Americans, fire departments, safety codes, building codes  
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3071 clicks; posted to Main » on 26 Jan 2014 at 1:32 PM (43 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-01-26 01:33:55 PM  
static.squarespace.com
We'll take it
 
2014-01-26 01:36:58 PM  
Other than the big red truck parked inside it you mean?
 
2014-01-26 01:43:39 PM  
It would take zero seconds for the fire dept. to respond to that location, there's lots of firefighting equipment already on site, and the firefighters have to be in tip-top shape. (And not, say, in a wheelchair.)

So, where's the problem?
 
2014-01-26 01:50:58 PM  
Too much regulations....
 
2014-01-26 01:55:26 PM  
Firefighters in wheelchairs FTW!
 
2014-01-26 01:57:22 PM  
Make it into a Mine, and let MSHA do one inspection.  There will be no accepting "Well, we would like to fix it, but...".  You have twenty four hours to fix it, or MSHA will shut down the entire building, and send your workers home (with pay) until you do.

It burns me that the government can get away with non-compliance with their own rules and regulations because it's too hard or too expensive or they can't think of a plan.  If I have one fridge in a breakroom that the guys let get dirty, it's a $2300 citation.  Broken chair in the breakroom?  $420.
 
2014-01-26 01:57:48 PM  

gerbilpox: It would take zero seconds for the fire dept. to respond to that location, there's lots of firefighting equipment already on site, and the firefighters have to be in tip-top shape. (And not, say, in a wheelchair.)

So, where's the problem?


What if they're gone, huh? Who's gonna put the fire out then?
 
2014-01-26 01:58:33 PM  
My dad was a firefighter decades ago. The station wasn't much more than a garage with a small kitchen area and a bathroom. There was a smallish "lounging" area where they had a card table, a few chairs, and a couch. There was an old TV, too, but it was mostly used to watch sports or to occupy the kids when they were stuck hanging out there, waiting for their dads. The kitchen had a stack of locally-made sodas on pallets, and a supply of Clark bars, as well as basic food items.

There was no sprinkler system in place. There was a smoke alarm, of course, but it was in the kitchen area, on the ceiling (which was pretty high, IIRC). The "fire suppression system" was the damned truck, which was filled with large quantities of water and foam.

As for ADA compliance, well... There weren't a lot of crippled, wheelchair-bound firefighters back then. If that has changed, then more power to them, but there's no reason for anyone other than a firefighter (or his immediate family, on certain occasions) to visit a fire station. The permits and all that other junk are given out at the courthouse or other bureaucratic buildings. The fire station was where they stored the firefighting equipment and where the firefighters hung out and played cards while eating hot dogs and chili in-between fire calls.
 
2014-01-26 02:00:57 PM  

gerbilpox: It would take zero seconds for the fire dept. to respond to that location, there's lots of firefighting equipment already on site, and the firefighters have to be in tip-top shape. (And not, say, in a wheelchair.)

So, where's the problem?


Its not going to matter if all the equipment in the world is stationed there if its all out on calls. Fire alarms actually help by 1) warning the people inside the building that there is a fire, and 2) Sending a signal to local 911 services, or an alarm company that there is a fire.

The issue with ADA certification is that Fire stations are "safe places" that people can goto when they need protection from home like (Such as abuse, rape, ect.) If someone disabled cannot get into the safe place, they cannot be protected.
 
2014-01-26 02:08:46 PM  
The city had to spend all the money on those juicy firefighter pensions.
 
2014-01-26 02:09:23 PM  
I was under the impression that Connecticut ranked very high in the lists of criteria like wealth, quality of life, government services, etc.,
 
2014-01-26 02:20:00 PM  
Everything was fine with their system until the power grid was shut off by dickless.
 
2014-01-26 02:25:34 PM  

zamboni: Everything was fine with their system until the power grid was shut off by dickless.


Is this true?

www.quickmeme.com
 
2014-01-26 02:26:26 PM  
This is just as terrible as a 911 operator having no ability to call 911, only the local police and fire departments.
 
2014-01-26 02:30:46 PM  

simrobert2001: gerbilpox: It would take zero seconds for the fire dept. to respond to that location, there's lots of firefighting equipment already on site, and the firefighters have to be in tip-top shape. (And not, say, in a wheelchair.)

So, where's the problem?

Its not going to matter if all the equipment in the world is stationed there if its all out on calls. Fire alarms actually help by 1) warning the people inside the building that there is a fire, and 2) Sending a signal to local 911 services, or an alarm company that there is a fire.

The issue with ADA certification is that Fire stations are "safe places" that people can goto when they need protection from home like (Such as abuse, rape, ect.) If someone disabled cannot get into the safe place, they cannot be protected.


When did that happen?

Honestly, I never saw that happen. The police station? Sure. But the fire station was literally just a garage where they stored the equipment and firefighters. There's usually nothing there in regards to guest accommodations or visitor areas. It's a garage. There are a couple big doors for trucks to go through, and there are a couple little doors that lead into the same open area where the trucks are, for the people to go through. There's a sewer drain on the floor because they wash the trucks inside the firestation.

Maybe some newer full-time stations are all fancy, but traditionally, nobody has gone to the fire station to find solace. It's just a place from which firefighters are dispatched. It's utilitarian and above-ground, and frequently unmanned in the case of volunteer fire departments. if you went there when you were in trouble, you'd have a good chance of knocking on the door of an empty garage.
 
2014-01-26 02:31:36 PM  

gerbilpox: It would take zero seconds for the fire dept. to respond to that location, there's lots of firefighting equipment already on site, and the firefighters have to be in tip-top shape. (And not, say, in a wheelchair.)

So, where's the problem?


Because they would never send the trucks, equipment and crews out, would they? Also, if the fire starts in the garage and people don't realize immediately?

As a professional fire department with 3 stations, there are likely some support staff that don't require the level of physical conditioning (and a good chance they are located at the "Headquarters").
 
2014-01-26 02:39:06 PM  

gerbilpox: It would take zero seconds for the fire dept. to respond to that location, there's lots of firefighting equipment already on site, and the firefighters have to be in tip-top shape. (And not, say, in a wheelchair.)

So, where's the problem?


And yet fire stations can and do burn down.  It's not even that uncommon.
 
2014-01-26 03:02:31 PM  

simrobert2001: gerbilpox: It would take zero seconds for the fire dept. to respond to that location, there's lots of firefighting equipment already on site, and the firefighters have to be in tip-top shape. (And not, say, in a wheelchair.)

So, where's the problem?

Its not going to matter if all the equipment in the world is stationed there if its all out on calls. Fire alarms actually help by 1) warning the people inside the building that there is a fire, and 2) Sending a signal to local 911 services, or an alarm company that there is a fire.

The issue with ADA certification is that Fire stations are "safe places" that people can goto when they need protection from home like (Such as abuse, rape, ect.) If someone disabled cannot get into the safe place, they cannot be protected.


What world do you live in? Smoke detectors don't work that way and why woud you go to a fie station instead of calling 911?
 
2014-01-26 03:03:57 PM  

ZeroCorpse: As for ADA compliance, well... There weren't a lot of crippled, wheelchair-bound firefighters back then.


I DNRTFA, but perhaps this issue was related to accessibility to members of the general public coming into the offices to arrange for inspections, seek information, take kids on tours...
 
2014-01-26 03:03:58 PM  

ZeroCorpse: As for ADA compliance, well... There weren't a lot of crippled, wheelchair-bound firefighters back then


We took tours of fire stations in elementary school. It would suck to be left behind because you're in a wheelchair.
 
2014-01-26 03:09:56 PM  
outpost81.com
 
2014-01-26 03:12:18 PM  
You mean to say that an old building in need of replacement isn't compliant with newer rules? Say it ain't so!

In all seriousness though, if the building is historic, it needs to be slapped onto the historic building register and pretty much abandoned, or at least refitted with sprinklers and used as archive storage or something, these guys need to have a decent building that can meet code just like any other office.
 
2014-01-26 03:17:43 PM  

ZeroCorpse: Maybe some newer full-time stations are all fancy, but traditionally, nobody has gone to the fire station to find solace. It's just a place from which firefighters are dispatched. It's utilitarian and above-ground, and frequently unmanned in the case of volunteer fire departments. if you went there when you were in trouble, you'd have a good chance of knocking on the door of an empty garage.


Or you're likely to find a locked-up building that's full of sleeping firefighters. They're secured areas. If you need help, there's a phone or button outside. If someone in a wheelchair needs to get indoors, they can open the garage doors -- fire trucks don't like steps much either.
 
2014-01-26 03:18:59 PM  
I love it when I click a link to a local news article and can't find anywhere what state this city is in
 
2014-01-26 03:20:38 PM  

graeylin: Make it into a Mine, and let MSHA do one inspection.  There will be no accepting "Well, we would like to fix it, but...".  You have twenty four hours to fix it, or MSHA will shut down the entire building, and send your workers home (with pay) until you do.

It burns me that the government can get away with non-compliance with their own rules and regulations because it's too hard or too expensive or they can't think of a plan.  If I have one fridge in a breakroom that the guys let get dirty, it's a $2300 citation.  Broken chair in the breakroom?  $420.


Is there a rule that you have to give them a break room? Because I'd just get rid of that if I were you, it sounds like a money pit.
 
2014-01-26 03:30:09 PM  

AndreMA: ZeroCorpse: As for ADA compliance, well... There weren't a lot of crippled, wheelchair-bound firefighters back then.

I DNRTFA, but perhaps this issue was related to accessibility to members of the general public coming into the offices to arrange for inspections, seek information, take kids on tours...


As I said-- All that stuff is done at the courthouse, not in the fire station.
 
2014-01-26 03:34:58 PM  

ZeroCorpse: Honestly, I never saw that happen. The police station? Sure. But the fire station was literally just a garage where they stored the equipment and firefighters. There's usually nothing there in regards to guest accommodations or visitor areas. It's a garage. There are a couple big doors for trucks to go through, and there are a couple little doors that lead into the same open area where the trucks are, for the people to go through. There's a sewer drain on the floor because they wash the trucks inside the firestation.


All the fire stations around here have the "safe Place" Sign. I assumed it was all of them. Are you telling me that the ONLY fire stations here that would help someone who knocks on their door?

chitownmike: simrobert2001: gerbilpox: It would take zero seconds for the fire dept. to respond to that location, there's lots of firefighting equipment already on site, and the firefighters have to be in tip-top shape. (And not, say, in a wheelchair.)

So, where's the problem?

Its not going to matter if all the equipment in the world is stationed there if its all out on calls. Fire alarms actually help by 1) warning the people inside the building that there is a fire, and 2) Sending a signal to local 911 services, or an alarm company that there is a fire.

The issue with ADA certification is that Fire stations are "safe places" that people can goto when they need protection from home like (Such as abuse, rape, ect.) If someone disabled cannot get into the safe place, they cannot be protected.

What world do you live in? Smoke detectors don't work that way and why woud you go to a fie station instead of calling 911?


The fire station here is by a park, a busy road, several restaurants, an apartment complex, and a high school.  Its not out of the question for someone to not have a cellphone, and knock on the door saying "Hey, i need help/got into an accident/saw someone kidnapped/am in a disabled vehicle.' All of the other places can legally turn you away, but the Fire department won't.
 
2014-01-26 03:35:38 PM  

WelldeadLink: ZeroCorpse: Maybe some newer full-time stations are all fancy, but traditionally, nobody has gone to the fire station to find solace. It's just a place from which firefighters are dispatched. It's utilitarian and above-ground, and frequently unmanned in the case of volunteer fire departments. if you went there when you were in trouble, you'd have a good chance of knocking on the door of an empty garage.

Or you're likely to find a locked-up building that's full of sleeping firefighters. They're secured areas. If you need help, there's a phone or button outside. If someone in a wheelchair needs to get indoors, they can open the garage doors -- fire trucks don't like steps much either.


Right. In a full-time station, they usually have living quarters upstairs. This consists of a series of cots/beds, a row of lockers, a couple small bathrooms (if they're lucky), and a kitchenette. It does not need to be handicap-accessible because the handicapped have no business in the firefighter living quarters. It's designed so the firefighters can sleep, use the restroom, wash, dress, and get to the trucks quickly.

But not all stations are full-time. There's usually one or those in an large town, and then several small part-time "volunteer" stations to make up the rest of the force (BTW, volunteer firefighters aren't really "volunteers" in the true sense; They get paid. They're just part-timers.) Small towns often do not have the full-time station, and just have a couple volunteer stations, if that.

And yes, if you need to get a wheelchair into a station for some reason, you can always go though the huge doors for trucks. No ramp needed.
 
2014-01-26 03:36:48 PM  

ransack.: I love it when I click a link to a local news article and can't find anywhere what state this city is in


I think that a lot of places don't realize that them thar interwebs goes to the whole world.

(This one says Connecticut in the logo, and New London in the title, however)

But yeah... sometimes if I look at the weather page I can get some clues.
 
2014-01-26 03:37:10 PM  

ransack.: I love it when I click a link to a local news article and can't find anywhere what state this city is in


You mean as part of the logo?  The Day Connecticut is right at the top left of the screen.
 
2014-01-26 03:38:44 PM  

simrobert2001: All the fire stations around here have the "safe Place" Sign. I assumed it was all of them. Are you telling me that the ONLY fire stations here that would help someone who knocks on their door?


I have never seen a sign like that in Michigan.

As I said, if you go to most stations in most towns, you run a good chance of being met with silence when you knock on the door because there's nobody there, or because (if it's a full-time station) the firefighters are asleep and the place is locked up and secure.

If you need help, you ask to use someone's phone and dial 911, and then they send the appropriate responders. Firefighters aren't cops. If you're being raped, they can't help you any more than any other civilian can.
 
2014-01-26 03:39:51 PM  

ransack.: I love it when I click a link to a local news article and can't find anywhere what state this city is in


Agreed. You'd think they'd be proud of it and post the city/state at the top of their page.
 
2014-01-26 03:44:45 PM  

FrancoFile: ransack.: I love it when I click a link to a local news article and can't find anywhere what state this city is in

You mean as part of the logo?  The Day Connecticut is right at the top left of the screen.


I didn't have images turned on. And what if maybe I'm blind and I'm using speech synthesizer software? I just ctrl+F'd and there's no hits for "Conn", so it doesn't say Connecticut anywhere and there's no way I could know.

So this website isn't ADA friendly, and they're calling out a building for not being ADA compliant.
 
2014-01-26 03:46:08 PM  
Not everyone has broadband and/or functional eyeballs, you know. To some people the internet is only text.
 
2014-01-26 04:25:06 PM  
Ah... hometown news. Always fun.
 
2014-01-26 04:26:59 PM  

ransack.: FrancoFile: ransack.: I love it when I click a link to a local news article and can't find anywhere what state this city is in

You mean as part of the logo?  The Day Connecticut is right at the top left of the screen.

I didn't have images turned on. And what if maybe I'm blind and I'm using speech synthesizer software? I just ctrl+F'd and there's no hits for "Conn", so it doesn't say Connecticut anywhere and there's no way I could know.

So this website isn't ADA friendly, and they're calling out a building for not being ADA compliant.


Anyone from CT would recognize the city names instantly. I'm not sure there's an ADA requirement for news papers to print the name of the state on each page.
 
2014-01-26 04:46:40 PM  

DarkSoulNoHope: zamboni: Everything was fine with their system until the power grid was shut off by dickless.

Is this true?


I'm glad to see the Ghostbusters theme continued from OP
 
2014-01-26 04:59:54 PM  
As old as that fire department headquarters is, it's probably prohibitively expensive to make it ADA compliant.  It's probably the same for just about all of the buildings they talk about.  Considering the deficiencies they talk about in the article, it may easily be cheaper to tear it down and just build new if you have to have an ADA compliant building.  If the structures are historic and there is a desire to preserve them, then you just have to go out and find the funding to do that if preservation is what you want.   

It seems like the deficiencies aren't the problem but are a symptom of a city with a tax base that has shrunken to a size where the only way it can maintain city services is by robbing the building maintenance budget to fund services.  That only works for so long if the tax base doesn't come back, and it seems they've just about come to the end of that rope.
 
2014-01-26 05:03:31 PM  
i.imgur.com
i.imgur.com
 
2014-01-26 05:26:14 PM  

andyofne: ransack.: FrancoFile: ransack.: I love it when I click a link to a local news article and can't find anywhere what state this city is in

You mean as part of the logo?  The Day Connecticut is right at the top left of the screen.

I didn't have images turned on. And what if maybe I'm blind and I'm using speech synthesizer software? I just ctrl+F'd and there's no hits for "Conn", so it doesn't say Connecticut anywhere and there's no way I could know.

So this website isn't ADA friendly, and they're calling out a building for not being ADA compliant.

Anyone from CT would recognize the city names instantly. I'm not sure there's an ADA requirement for news papers to print the name of the state on each page.


It's not, but there are guidelines for making web pages friendly to text-to-speech synthesizers and browsers for blind users, and one of those guidelines is to include vital information as actual text and not just represented with an image, so that a user with only access to text (be it from blindness or maybe you use African dial-up or very expensive satellite internet) is not left wondering where in the hell New London might be.
 
2014-01-26 05:49:50 PM  

ransack.: andyofne: ransack.: FrancoFile: ransack.: I love it when I click a link to a local news article and can't find anywhere what state this city is in

You mean as part of the logo?  The Day Connecticut is right at the top left of the screen.

I didn't have images turned on. And what if maybe I'm blind and I'm using speech synthesizer software? I just ctrl+F'd and there's no hits for "Conn", so it doesn't say Connecticut anywhere and there's no way I could know.

So this website isn't ADA friendly, and they're calling out a building for not being ADA compliant.

Anyone from CT would recognize the city names instantly. I'm not sure there's an ADA requirement for news papers to print the name of the state on each page.

It's not, but there are guidelines for making web pages friendly to text-to-speech synthesizers and browsers for blind users, and one of those guidelines is to include vital information as actual text and not just represented with an image, so that a user with only access to text (be it from blindness or maybe you use African dial-up or very expensive satellite internet) is not left wondering where in the hell New London might be.


Point taken.  The logo should have an alt tag that's more useful than "url_logo"

However, compared to most local news sites, this one at least made an effort.
 
2014-01-26 06:06:56 PM  

ransack.: graeylin: Make it into a Mine, and let MSHA do one inspection.  There will be no accepting "Well, we would like to fix it, but...".  You have twenty four hours to fix it, or MSHA will shut down the entire building, and send your workers home (with pay) until you do.

It burns me that the government can get away with non-compliance with their own rules and regulations because it's too hard or too expensive or they can't think of a plan.  If I have one fridge in a breakroom that the guys let get dirty, it's a $2300 citation.  Broken chair in the breakroom?  $420.

Is there a rule that you have to give them a break room? Because I'd just get rid of that if I were you, it sounds like a money pit.


Yup.  Required to have a place of shade/cool, water, a shower and restroom, table, benches/chairs in a clean area, away from hazardous chemicals, with potable water and locations to store food containers, clothing, etc..  I could technically remove the fridge, and trust me, I thought about it.

Even better?  They can deliberately trash the area, then call MSHA, file a complaint, and an inspector will be there the next day, ready to cite the company.
 
2014-01-26 06:24:44 PM  
images.generation-msx.nl
i have absolutely nothing of value to contribute to this thread. why am i here?
 
2014-01-26 06:28:32 PM  

ZeroCorpse: My dad was a firefighter decades ago. The station wasn't much more than a garage with a small kitchen area and a bathroom. There was a smallish "lounging" area where they had a card table, a few chairs, and a couch. There was an old TV, too, but it was mostly used to watch sports or to occupy the kids when they were stuck hanging out there, waiting for their dads. The kitchen had a stack of locally-made sodas on pallets, and a supply of Clark bars, as well as basic food items.

There was no sprinkler system in place. There was a smoke alarm, of course, but it was in the kitchen area, on the ceiling (which was pretty high, IIRC). The "fire suppression system" was the damned truck, which was filled with large quantities of water and foam.

As for ADA compliance, well... There weren't a lot of crippled, wheelchair-bound firefighters back then. If that has changed, then more power to them, but there's no reason for anyone other than a firefighter (or his immediate family, on certain occasions) to visit a fire station. The permits and all that other junk are given out at the courthouse or other bureaucratic buildings. The fire station was where they stored the firefighting equipment and where the firefighters hung out and played cards while eating hot dogs and chili in-between fire calls.


Concerning ADA: this building, which I know fairly well, is headquarters. It houses the shift commander, fire marshal's office and the chief's office. Public access to those offices is necessary for any number of reasons. These offices are on the second floor, with no option to put them downstairs.

The lack of sprinklers isn't a big deal. What is a big deal is that the building is falling apart, and maintainance has been neglected for decades. The floor is sinking, noticeable because steam radiators are being supported by their pipes with their feet about an inch off the floor. There is mold throughout, not just around the showers. When it rains hard, the floor drains flow backward into the apparatus bay and kitchen. There's vermin. During a severe storm, a window sash fell in, injuring the police chief. New London has ignored preventative maintainance on its public buildings for decades, not just fire headquarters, city hall or the senior center.
 
2014-01-26 06:36:18 PM  

lizyrd: ZeroCorpse: My dad was a firefighter decades ago. The station wasn't much more than a garage with a small kitchen area and a bathroom. There was a smallish "lounging" area where they had a card table, a few chairs, and a couch. There was an old TV, too, but it was mostly used to watch sports or to occupy the kids when they were stuck hanging out there, waiting for their dads. The kitchen had a stack of locally-made sodas on pallets, and a supply of Clark bars, as well as basic food items.

There was no sprinkler system in place. There was a smoke alarm, of course, but it was in the kitchen area, on the ceiling (which was pretty high, IIRC). The "fire suppression system" was the damned truck, which was filled with large quantities of water and foam.

As for ADA compliance, well... There weren't a lot of crippled, wheelchair-bound firefighters back then. If that has changed, then more power to them, but there's no reason for anyone other than a firefighter (or his immediate family, on certain occasions) to visit a fire station. The permits and all that other junk are given out at the courthouse or other bureaucratic buildings. The fire station was where they stored the firefighting equipment and where the firefighters hung out and played cards while eating hot dogs and chili in-between fire calls.

Concerning ADA: this building, which I know fairly well, is headquarters. It houses the shift commander, fire marshal's office and the chief's office. Public access to those offices is necessary for any number of reasons. These offices are on the second floor, with no option to put them downstairs.

The lack of sprinklers isn't a big deal. What is a big deal is that the building is falling apart, and maintainance has been neglected for decades. The floor is sinking, noticeable because steam radiators are being supported by their pipes with their feet about an inch off the floor. There is mold throughout, not just around the showers. When it rains hard, the floor drains flow backward into the apparatus bay and kitchen. There's vermin. During a severe storm, a window sash fell in, injuring the police chief. New London has ignored preventative maintainance on its public buildings for decades, not just fire headquarters, city hall or the senior center.


They are probably just skimping on maintenance to save up and build you a brand new fire station like ours
www.cityofperu.org
 
2014-01-26 06:54:45 PM  

Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: ZeroCorpse: As for ADA compliance, well... There weren't a lot of crippled, wheelchair-bound firefighters back then

We took tours of fire stations in elementary school. It would suck to be left behind because you're in a wheelchair.


It would also suck to have some firefighter die because the department had to blow its budget on a wheelchair ramp rather than new equipment.
 
2014-01-26 06:55:00 PM  

ZeroCorpse: AndreMA: ZeroCorpse: As for ADA compliance, well... There weren't a lot of crippled, wheelchair-bound firefighters back then.

I DNRTFA, but perhaps this issue was related to accessibility to members of the general public coming into the offices to arrange for inspections, seek information, take kids on tours...

As I said-- All that stuff is done at the courthouse, not in the fire station.


You need to understand Connecticut. There is no county government, no local courts or courthouses. New London is home to a state superior court, but most towns do not have a courthouse. If you own a multi-family or commercial property and need to do business with the fire marshal's staff, you go to his office. Which is up 25 steps at fire headquarters. If you want to make a complaint about fire department operations, biatch about an ambulance bill or whatever, you go to the chief's office...up 25 steps. These are areas that the public has a right to access but that are inaccessable to people with mobility problems.
 
2014-01-26 07:21:22 PM  

lizyrd: ZeroCorpse: AndreMA: ZeroCorpse: As for ADA compliance, well... There weren't a lot of crippled, wheelchair-bound firefighters back then.

I DNRTFA, but perhaps this issue was related to accessibility to members of the general public coming into the offices to arrange for inspections, seek information, take kids on tours...

As I said-- All that stuff is done at the courthouse, not in the fire station.

You need to understand Connecticut. There is no county government, no local courts or courthouses. New London is home to a state superior court, but most towns do not have a courthouse. If you own a multi-family or commercial property and need to do business with the fire marshal's staff, you go to his office. Which is up 25 steps at fire headquarters. If you want to make a complaint about fire department operations, biatch about an ambulance bill or whatever, you go to the chief's office...up 25 steps. These are areas that the public has a right to access but that are inaccessable to people with mobility problems.


Yes but the trip back downstairs is much easier

www.texaninsurance.com
 
2014-01-26 07:32:10 PM  

ransack.: lizyrd: ZeroCorpse: AndreMA: ZeroCorpse: As for ADA compliance, well... There weren't a lot of crippled, wheelchair-bound firefighters back then.

I DNRTFA, but perhaps this issue was related to accessibility to members of the general public coming into the offices to arrange for inspections, seek information, take kids on tours...

As I said-- All that stuff is done at the courthouse, not in the fire station.

You need to understand Connecticut. There is no county government, no local courts or courthouses. New London is home to a state superior court, but most towns do not have a courthouse. If you own a multi-family or commercial property and need to do business with the fire marshal's staff, you go to his office. Which is up 25 steps at fire headquarters. If you want to make a complaint about fire department operations, biatch about an ambulance bill or whatever, you go to the chief's office...up 25 steps. These are areas that the public has a right to access but that are inaccessable to people with mobility problems.

Yes but the trip back downstairs is much easier


Sadly, there is no pole at NLFD headquarters. There used to be, but they ripped it out years ago because of OSHA rules concerning enclosing it on the top to keep people from falling down the hole, and sealing it on the bottom to keep diesel smoke from getting into the living quarters. It was cheaper to comply by ripping it out and flooring over the hole. They probably made a few bucks scrapping the brass, too.
 
2014-01-26 07:41:54 PM  

lizyrd: ransack.: lizyrd: ZeroCorpse: AndreMA: ZeroCorpse: As for ADA compliance, well... There weren't a lot of crippled, wheelchair-bound firefighters back then.

I DNRTFA, but perhaps this issue was related to accessibility to members of the general public coming into the offices to arrange for inspections, seek information, take kids on tours...

As I said-- All that stuff is done at the courthouse, not in the fire station.

You need to understand Connecticut. There is no county government, no local courts or courthouses. New London is home to a state superior court, but most towns do not have a courthouse. If you own a multi-family or commercial property and need to do business with the fire marshal's staff, you go to his office. Which is up 25 steps at fire headquarters. If you want to make a complaint about fire department operations, biatch about an ambulance bill or whatever, you go to the chief's office...up 25 steps. These are areas that the public has a right to access but that are inaccessable to people with mobility problems.

Yes but the trip back downstairs is much easier

Sadly, there is no pole at NLFD headquarters. There used to be, but they ripped it out years ago because of OSHA rules concerning enclosing it on the top to keep people from falling down the hole, and sealing it on the bottom to keep diesel smoke from getting into the living quarters. It was cheaper to comply by ripping it out and flooring over the hole. They probably made a few bucks scrapping the brass, too.


That place sounds like the worst fire station I ever heard of. I hope the actual firefighting apparatuses are in the typical mint condition, at least.
 
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