Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Japan Today)   In fantastic breakthrough, researchers have succeeded in using cosmic rays to see nuclear fuel inside a reactor   (japantoday.com ) divider line
    More: Cool, cosmic rays, Muons, nuclear fuels, high density, spent fuel pool, Fukushima Daiichi, Tokyo Electric Power Co., nuclear reactors  
•       •       •

2884 clicks; posted to Geek » on 26 Jan 2014 at 10:16 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



13 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-01-26 10:58:09 AM  
Marvelous thing and certainly better than a torch for seeing invisible particles.
 
2014-01-26 11:16:02 AM  
Chief scientists Reed Richards assured the public that the shielding is adequate and absolutely nothing could possibly go wrong when he and three colleagues will do a close inspection of the live device tomorrow.
 
2014-01-26 11:51:53 AM  
Pics?
 
2014-01-26 12:10:17 PM  
www.madcats.co.uk

Source of cosmic rays
 
2014-01-26 12:43:26 PM  
The thing is, I think that they are stretching this hot topic to the point of transparency.
 
2014-01-26 12:50:44 PM  
I saw something about a density detector using cosmic rays a few months ago. The idea is that a ray can be detected transiting through the top of the detector, gets deflected by matter, the denser the more deflected, and gets detected moving through the other side. It's proposed as a nuclear bomb detector at ports, able to sense a lump of uranium shielded by lead.

The trick is making the system fit around a building.
 
2014-01-26 01:05:16 PM  
An article proclaiming images of the inside of a nuclear reactor using cosmic rays and they show this instead:

www.japantoday.com

That's some fine reporting there, Lu.

//hot, like the inside of the nuclear reactor, if you were able to see it.
 
2014-01-26 01:37:31 PM  
wac.450f.edgecastcdn.net
 
2014-01-26 02:00:14 PM  
img.fark.net

Leave it to Japan to build the first nuclear accident theme park.

Ride the TSUNAMI!
 
2014-01-26 03:14:00 PM  

studebaker hoch: Leave it to Japan to build the first nuclear accident theme park.

Ride the TSUNAMI!


You sir, and you madam.

Step right up!
 
2014-01-26 03:52:32 PM  

Nina_Hartley's_Ass: Marvelous thing and certainly better than a torch for seeing invisible particles.


I see what you did there.

static.comicvine.com
 
2014-01-26 04:36:21 PM  

GilRuiz1: Pics?


That.

TAIUWOP
 
2014-01-26 08:40:02 PM  

wildcardjack: The trick is making the system fit around a building.


Frankly that part isn't that hard these days - large area detectors like GEMS and MRPCs are relatively cheap these days. The problem is that the method relies on there being a single high-Z (Z=charge) object (e.g. nuclear fuel) inside an otherwise low-Z environment. In this case, one can measure  the cosmic muon entrance and exit vectors, and some fraction of thesethese will very nicely extrapolate vectorially to thehigh-Z scattering center. Easy-peasy.
If the high-Z material of interest is inside an environment of almost-high-Z, multiple scattering occurs with regularity, and once cannot as efficiently vector to a point inside the volume anymore...
In the case of TFA, they know the environment, and it works out.

But in the case where this idea was proposed to non-invasively search for contraband in shipping containers or whatever, all the bad guys would have to do is place the high-Z contraband inside something  similarly high-Z, like engine blocks. In that case, the method still works, but you have to run the experiment for weeks in order to see the signal (single vectorable scatters) over the background (multiple scatters).

FWIW - Luis Alvarez used this idea (LGT PDF) to search for hidden chambers inside ancient pyramids in the 1960's. I have the actual paper but this link was the easiest to find. It's a neat idea, but it works only in special cases... cheers
 
Displayed 13 of 13 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter






In Other Media
  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report