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(CNBC)   Does profanity belong in the modern workplace? F*ck yes   (cnbc.com ) divider line
    More: Obvious, c-words  
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4251 clicks; posted to Main » on 25 Jan 2014 at 9:54 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-01-25 07:41:59 PM  
images.sodahead.com

Here's your two orders of large fries, you fat fark.
 
2014-01-25 09:57:40 PM  
In machine shops especially.
 
2014-01-25 10:00:06 PM  
The more you overuse profanity the less power the words will have to offend.
 
2014-01-25 10:00:19 PM  
Time to watch West Wing again for the billionth time.
 
2014-01-25 10:00:22 PM  
In college I became an atheist, so all the damns fell out of my speech as I concluded there was none such.

In air traffic control I had two agencies able to fine me for saying fark, so I learned to bite my lip.

Now I don't speak much as a used book dealer.
 
2014-01-25 10:03:13 PM  
No, not at all.  Profanity is the weak-minded person's way of conveying emotion.  If you can't express anger, intensity or rage without resorting a string of profane words and terms, I feel sorry for your lack of a vocabulary.
 
2014-01-25 10:03:28 PM  
I encourage all of you in the law enforcement community to review this thought provoking link (NSFW) with your coworkers.
 
2014-01-25 10:05:05 PM  

Cytokine Storm: Time to watch West Wing again for the billionth time.


Time to double check which thread I'm posting in for the billionth time.
 
2014-01-25 10:06:55 PM  

wildcardjack: In college I became an atheist, so all the damns fell out of my speech as I concluded there was none such.

In air traffic control I had two agencies able to fine me for saying fark, so I learned to bite my lip.

Now I don't speak much as a used book dealer.


Oh, are you a used book dealer?  I hadn't heard.

/jk, seems like a neeto way to make money
 
2014-01-25 10:10:55 PM  
Yes, in some places. No, in others. For example, I called one of my students the dumbest f**king shiathead I had ever come across, and now I don't have a job.

Well, if I had actually said that, I wouldn't have a job.
 
2014-01-25 10:13:50 PM  

lewismarktwo: wildcardjack: In college I became an atheist, so all the damns fell out of my speech as I concluded there was none such.

In air traffic control I had two agencies able to fine me for saying fark, so I learned to bite my lip.

Now I don't speak much as a used book dealer.

Oh, are you a used book dealer?  I hadn't heard.

/jk, seems like a neeto way to make money


I don't talk about it much.
 
2014-01-25 10:14:07 PM  

Prey4reign: No, not at all.  Profanity is the weak-minded person's way of conveying emotion.  If you can't express anger, intensity or rage without resorting a string of profane words and terms, I feel sorry for your lack of a vocabulary.


Came here to say roughly this.

Profanity is a crutch. Build a vocabulary and express yourself.
Watched my manager drop a string of f-bombs at his bosses today, all in casual conversation. Nearly matched the Boondock Saints monologue from the hotel scene.
 
2014-01-25 10:14:52 PM  
If a person doesn't yell and swear at their computer when shiat goes wrong, they're not fit for the software industry.
 
2014-01-25 10:15:25 PM  

wildcardjack: In college I became an atheist, so all the damns fell out of my speech as I concluded there was none such.


What other colloquial phrases have you given up because they make little sense? Do people still get "fired" even though there is no fire involved? Can you still have an ace in the hole, or a trick up your sleeve? Do you still sometime beat around the bush?

/in short, you're a very silly man
 
2014-01-25 10:16:16 PM  
With customers / clients, no.
Otherwise, it's Tourettes on Parade. Shoveling snow, Tourettes on Ice.
 
2014-01-25 10:17:42 PM  
Still, probably best to hold off calling your boss "a stupid c*nt" .  For now, anyway.
 
2014-01-25 10:18:04 PM  
I work for three Aussies and a Limey. "coont" is a catch-all word for just about everything.
 
2014-01-25 10:20:23 PM  

Billy Liar: Still, probably best to hold off calling your boss "a stupid c*nt" .  For now, anyway.


Try working in the oil industry. Calling people stupud c*nts is pretty much mandatory.
 
2014-01-25 10:22:17 PM  

MrEricSir: If a person doesn't yell and swear at their computer when shiat goes wrong, they're not fit for the software industry.


Call the helpdesk and swear at them.
 
2014-01-25 10:24:54 PM  

wildcardjack: In college I became an atheist, so all the damns fell out of my speech as I concluded there was none such.

In air traffic control I had two agencies able to fine me for saying fark, so I learned to bite my lip.

Now I don't speak much as a used book dealer.


A lot of people are turned off from the word "used". You should call them "previously viewed writings".
 
2014-01-25 10:26:15 PM  
When your boss says "duhhh" then saying shiat is probably passable.
 
2014-01-25 10:26:36 PM  

Prey4reign: No, not at all.  Profanity is the weak-minded person's way of conveying emotion.  If you can't express anger, intensity or rage without resorting a string of profane words and terms, I feel sorry for your lack of a vocabulary.


Fark you
 
2014-01-25 10:28:16 PM  

Prey4reign: No, not at all.  Profanity is the weak-minded person's way of conveying emotion.  If you can't express anger, intensity or rage without resorting a string of profane words and terms, I feel sorry for your lack of a vocabularytime.


Sometimes saying "fark" is just faster than saying "Well that could have gone significantly better"
 
2014-01-25 10:29:49 PM  

wildcardjack: In college I became an atheist, so all the damns fell out of my speech as I concluded there was none such.

In air traffic control I had two agencies able to fine me for saying fark, so I learned to bite my lip.

Now I don't speak much as a used book dealer.


I'm an atheist too and I still say 'goddamn', 'goddamnit', 'my god', 'jesus christ', etc. all the time. They're tools of language, not a proclamation of belief.
 
2014-01-25 10:30:54 PM  
I work in a newsroom. Some of the things we encounter demand a "What the Fark?!?" every now and then.
 
2014-01-25 10:38:38 PM  

Prey4reign: No, not at all.  Profanity is the weak-minded person's way of conveying emotion.  If you can't express anger, intensity or rage without resorting a string of profane words and terms, I feel sorry for your lack of a vocabulary.


Nope.

Swear words have existed as long as language has existed precisely because they're an effective means of conveying specific emotion and tone. There are times when there is no effective substitute.

Studies have been conducted to measure the effect of using swear words versus 'substitute' swear words (exclaiming 'fudge!' instead of fark for example) under particular circumstances and it has been proven that the speaker does not receive the same benefit. One such study, for example, measured the perceived relief of sudden pain when a person exclaims a true swear word versus a substitute one and it was measured that a greater degree of pain relief was achieved by use of the genuine swear words.

The fact is that swear words are useful tools in our language toolkit, and that's never going to change no matter how much it might offend your delicate sensibilities.
 
2014-01-25 10:41:07 PM  

PolyHatSnake: Prey4reign: No, not at all.  Profanity is the weak-minded person's way of conveying emotion.  If you can't express anger, intensity or rage without resorting a string of profane words and terms, I feel sorry for your lack of a vocabulary.

Came here to say roughly this.

Profanity is a crutch. Build a vocabulary and express yourself.
Watched my manager drop a string of f-bombs at his bosses today, all in casual conversation. Nearly matched the Boondock Saints monologue from the hotel scene.


Profanity can be a crutch -- and for many people, that's pretty much all it is.

But, if you're a grown adult, you ought to know how to use profanity in a somewhat artful and socially appropriate way. Harboring language taboos isn't a sign of literacy or linguistic competence, either.
 
2014-01-25 10:42:44 PM  
In the Navv, swearing is pretty farking common. There's probably an expression out there for sailors and swearing but I can't think of it.
 
2014-01-25 10:47:27 PM  
And I'd like to add that if you're looking for a professional office environment free of swear words, don't go into the construction industry. I've been in structural engineering for 14 years and I can tell you that there's not an architect, engineer, salesperson, superintendent or foreman alive that doesn't swear as a matter of course.
 
2014-01-25 10:47:58 PM  
I work at a shipyard. The barges we build are composed primarily of ABS steel, ESAB 710X, and horrifying language. I think one of the reasons "cuss like a sailor" rings so true is that everything they sail on has a backbone of filthy vernacular.
 
gja
2014-01-25 10:48:55 PM  
theinspirationroom.com
Lady: "Poop"
Man: "Doesn't count"
Lady:"Shut the fark up"
 
2014-01-25 10:53:00 PM  

ChadM89: Prey4reign: No, not at all.  Profanity is the weak-minded person's way of conveying emotion.  If you can't express anger, intensity or rage without resorting a string of profane words and terms, I feel sorry for your lack of a vocabulary.

Nope.

Swear words have existed as long as language has existed precisely because they're an effective means of conveying specific emotion and tone. There are times when there is no effective substitute.

Studies have been conducted to measure the effect of using swear words versus 'substitute' swear words (exclaiming 'fudge!' instead of fark for example) under particular circumstances and it has been proven that the speaker does not receive the same benefit. One such study, for example, measured the perceived relief of sudden pain when a person exclaims a true swear word versus a substitute one and it was measured that a greater degree of pain relief was achieved by use of the genuine swear words.

The fact is that swear words are useful tools in our language toolkit, and that's never going to change no matter how much it might offend your delicate sensibilities.


You could have saved a lot of time by just telling him to go fark himself.
 
2014-01-25 10:54:52 PM  
www.aviddesignblog.com
 
2014-01-25 10:56:54 PM  
31.media.tumblr.com

i.imgur.com

static.entertainmentwise.com

24.media.tumblr.com

31.media.tumblr.com
 
2014-01-25 10:59:22 PM  
I generally don't swear at work if for no other reason than I know my audience. I'm not above it - if I get worked up or something particularly onerous comes up I'll let a few go but not very often. Most people I work with are the same way.
 
2014-01-25 11:03:43 PM  

PolyHatSnake: Prey4reign: No, not at all.  Profanity is the weak-minded person's way of conveying emotion.  If you can't express anger, intensity or rage without resorting a string of profane words and terms, I feel sorry for your lack of a vocabulary.

Came here to say roughly this.

Profanity is a crutch. Build a vocabulary and express yourself.
Watched my manager drop a string of f-bombs at his bosses today, all in casual conversation. Nearly matched the Boondock Saints monologue from the hotel scene.


Nope. Lame argument that adults came up with to try to manipulate kids into not cussing. Bullshiat.
 
2014-01-25 11:04:44 PM  
There is a marked and markable difference between profanity and vulgarity.  Vulgarity I don't think belongs in the workplace, and I think, in general, neither does profanity.

When you're working out in the field and you need to drop an F-bomb, because shiat just went tits up, sure. But when it becomes a constant, every-third-word part of your own vernacular...no.

And there's a lot to be said for being 'professional' in the workplace. Attending with clean, fresh, clothes, and in general comporting yourself in a professional manner tends to give a much better first impression of your company than slamming up to a person in 3 day old clothes and a week of neckbeard, smelling like Bigfoot's lovesponge, and rambling off a half dozen swears as a good morning.

And I say this as the single least professional person in my office, who's guilty of many of these things, and probably uses enough foul and vulgar language to get fired.  Just because it's socially acceptable, or moreso than it used to be, doesn't mean it's really a good idea. Act however you want at home, but when at work, at like a professional who's being paid to do a job. Courteous, polite, helpful, etc.
 
2014-01-25 11:06:22 PM  

Suckmaster Burstingfoam: ChadM89: Prey4reign: No, not at all.  Profanity is the weak-minded person's way of conveying emotion.  If you can't express anger, intensity or rage without resorting a string of profane words and terms, I feel sorry for your lack of a vocabulary.

Nope.

Swear words have existed as long as language has existed precisely because they're an effective means of conveying specific emotion and tone. There are times when there is no effective substitute.

Studies have been conducted to measure the effect of using swear words versus 'substitute' swear words (exclaiming 'fudge!' instead of fark for example) under particular circumstances and it has been proven that the speaker does not receive the same benefit. One such study, for example, measured the perceived relief of sudden pain when a person exclaims a true swear word versus a substitute one and it was measured that a greater degree of pain relief was achieved by use of the genuine swear words.

The fact is that swear words are useful tools in our language toolkit, and that's never going to change no matter how much it might offend your delicate sensibilities.

You could have saved a lot of time by just telling him to go fark himself.


I thought I did?
 
2014-01-25 11:12:03 PM  
I've found a well timed "gosh farking darn it!" relieves the tension.

Filtered, but not otherwise altered.
 
2014-01-25 11:12:33 PM  
As a chef, can I just opine: yes. Yes, yes it does. It is emphasis, it is local color, it is expected, it is di rigor, it is essential to keep business flowing. With distributors, with purveyors, with employees, with customers. I could not do business if I was G-rated. Even PG-13.

Were I teaching, that might be somewhat different, but I work in an industry where it is not just accepted, it is expected. When I worked for the NHL, it was likewise, expected. Yes, with clients. It is emphasis, it is color, it is simply a fact of kitchens: we swear and often when one language will not do, we borrow others. Yes, that includes with customers. We live in weird sub-culture, that is artist/craftsman/blue collar and thus, we are expected fully to interact with folks with a lot more blue tinged language than most. Burn yourself with a hot pan, and say, "Fudge!" and folks are going to ask if you just burned a pan of fudge, as opposed to injuring yourself.

I have open license to swear, and to the point, where invective of that sort, when expected otherwise in society, I can tear up and down like no tomorrow, and peel paint. It is as things should be.
 
2014-01-25 11:14:34 PM  

llort dam eht: I generally don't swear at work if for no other reason than I know my audience. I'm not above it - if I get worked up or something particularly onerous comes up I'll let a few go but not very often. Most people I work with are the same way.


I've been working for over 20 years, and I don't think I've sworn in the office in over a decade.  But last week we were sitting in a meeting and a coworker came up with such a profoundly stupid idea I just blurted out "Oh no, fark THAT."  I immediately regretted it, but after a beat the whole room broke into laughter, including the guy who came up with the idiotic idea.

It could have ended a lot worse, which is why I usually avoid cursing in the office.
 
2014-01-25 11:24:41 PM  

Lsherm: llort dam eht: I generally don't swear at work if for no other reason than I know my audience. I'm not above it - if I get worked up or something particularly onerous comes up I'll let a few go but not very often. Most people I work with are the same way.

I've been working for over 20 years, and I don't think I've sworn in the office in over a decade.  But last week we were sitting in a meeting and a coworker came up with such a profoundly stupid idea I just blurted out "Oh no, fark THAT."  I immediately regretted it, but after a beat the whole room broke into laughter, including the guy who came up with the idiotic idea.

It could have ended a lot worse, which is why I usually avoid cursing in the office.


Please don't take offense, I'm simply struggling to wrap my mind around this. When you say 'it could have ended a lot worse', I can't help but immediately think, 'how farking replaceable are you that losing your job over dropping an f-bomb is even within the realm of possibility?'
 
2014-01-25 11:27:33 PM  

ChadM89: Prey4reign: No, not at all.  Profanity is the weak-minded person's way of conveying emotion.  If you can't express anger, intensity or rage without resorting a string of profane words and terms, I feel sorry for your lack of a vocabulary.

Nope.

Swear words have existed as long as language has existed precisely because they're an effective means of conveying specific emotion and tone. There are times when there is no effective substitute.

Studies have been conducted to measure the effect of using swear words versus 'substitute' swear words (exclaiming 'fudge!' instead of fark for example) under particular circumstances and it has been proven that the speaker does not receive the same benefit. One such study, for example, measured the perceived relief of sudden pain when a person exclaims a true swear word versus a substitute one and it was measured that a greater degree of pain relief was achieved by use of the genuine swear words.

The fact is that swear words are useful tools in our language toolkit, and that's never going to change no matter how much it might offend your delicate sensibilities.


Yeah, I saw that episode of Mythbusters too.

Also the one where they swore at plants.
 
2014-01-25 11:27:37 PM  
If we didnt swear we would never communicate at all
 
2014-01-25 11:37:04 PM  

Prey4reign: No, not at all.  Profanity is the weak-minded person's way of conveying emotion.  If you can't express anger, intensity or rage without resorting a string of profane words and terms, I feel sorry for your lack of a vocabulary.


GFY
 
2014-01-25 11:45:24 PM  
My family bought a bar when I was 3.  I worked there from 19 to 26, and have been cooking since then.

I swear a little bit.
 
2014-01-25 11:48:41 PM  

ChadM89: Please don't take offense, I'm simply struggling to wrap my mind around this. When you say 'it could have ended a lot worse', I can't help but immediately think, 'how farking replaceable are you that losing your job over dropping an f-bomb is even within the realm of possibility?'


I didn't mean I'd get fired, I meant that the coworker could have taken real offense, or someone in HR would have given me a sternly worded letter.
 
2014-01-25 11:53:15 PM  

TheWriteGirl: My family bought a bar when I was 3.  I worked there from 19 to 26, and have been cooking since then.

I swear a little bit.


I swear a lot. Just not at work.
 
2014-01-25 11:56:45 PM  
Without profanity, how will we know when fat, ineffectual, mediocre "feminists" are outraged?
 
2014-01-25 11:59:57 PM  
mimg.ugo.com
 
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